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            [post_content] => California State University, Stanislaus’ Associated Students Inc. (ASI) Board of Directors came to a decision on whether or not student athletes receive early registration. The meeting was held on Feb. 17  in the Events Center and was filled with student athletes, whose main concern is not getting the classes they need.

The ASI Board of Directors voted in favor of athletes receiving early registration, with a tally of 13-1-0. Student athletes make up less than 3% of the CSU Stanislaus’ population.

CSU Stanislaus is the only campus in the California Collegiate Athletic Association that does not give their athletes priority registration. Both the athletes and the opposing students had strong opinions during the open discussion, creating a atmosphere with increasing tension.

"The Resolution in Support of Early Registration for Student Athletes" states that “student athletes who do not obtain the classes required to progress towards their degree, may be ineligible to compete, as well as potentially lose their athletic scholarship […].”

While it is important that student athletes meet the requirements to compete, other students voiced concern about meeting requirements for financial aid, graduation, etc.

“I strongly feel the vote misrepresented the opinions of the school as a whole,” Kelly Cearley (junior, Liberal Studies) said. “It sends a message that athletes are basically the most important thing.”

Cearley was also concerned about the representative number of students in favor of athletes having priority registration at the forum versus the number of representatives against the change.

"The people who were appointed are supposed to represent the students," Cearley said. "Therefore having seventy-plus student athletes versus about 4 anti-athlete priority registration students gave a skewed view of what reality was.”

Juan Villapudua, ASI Director of the College of Science, had the only opposing vote at the meeting on Tuesday. He was confronted by the students who were on his side, voicing their opinions to him.

“After the resolution was passed, a flood of students approached me infuriated with the outcome of our decision,” Villapudua said. “They feel that if we provide the privilege to student athletes their contributions to the campus community would be disregarded.”

Villapudua’s "Dissention to the Resolution" provided further insight on his dissenting opinion. It states that “by passing athlete priority registration, we would not only be upholding the values to distribute equal access for students as a university aims to service traditionally disadvantaged students.”

“I believe it is the easier route,” Villapudua said. “But the easiest route is not always the right route.”
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            [post_content] => Associated Students Inc. (ASI) will host an open forum on Feb. 24 allowing students to voice their concerns, listen to various issues and raise awareness about the changes that are being made on campus.

ASI Vice President Marvin Hooker and ASI Student Government Coordinator are arranging the event.

“We have invited a lot of programs that promote student success to come to the event and get the information,” Hooker said. “Students have a bunch of issues that we do not always know about and that is one thing we really want to focus on. We are going to talk about parking and how we are trying to find out what success means to students but the third component is what do we need to know or how can we better help or serve you.”

The Open Student Forum will take place in the Event Center from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 24. ASI Student Government encourages all students to come out to the forum.
            [post_title] => ASI Student Government invites students to open forum
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            [post_content] => California State University, Stanislaus Athletics recently released a video showcasing student athletes pledging to take a stand against sexual violence on campus.

The Stop Abuse Campaign has collaborated with other departments at CSU Stanislaus to provide a broad range of involvement and education efforts. It is also sponsored by the Title IX Coordinator, Dennis Shimek to help prevent crimes, such as sexual and relationship violence and stalking, from happening on campus.

Amanda Rosas, Assistant Marketing and Sponsorship, and Kim Duyst, Associate Athletic Director, were behind in bringing the Stop Abuse Campaign to Warrior Athletes to not only raise awareness within their athletes but to bring awareness to the campus community.

"It is important that athletics is involved because our student-athletes are very visible on campus and we want them to be on the forefront of this campaign," Duyst said.

To prevent such actions from occurring there have been numerous Title IX workshops to educate students on the importance of victim support, violence prevention and campus safety. This educational outreach program allows students and faculty to be aware of signs pointing to sexual violence.

Through the campaign, CSU Stanislaus Athletes are raising awareness and showing that they are committed to following the goals and principles of the Stop Abuse Campaign.

Warrior athletes pledged "to not bring aggression off the playing field, to hurdle over the social norms and sprint towards a new positive direction involving violence, to not sit on the bench when sexual assault is in play, to not strike out when informing others, to live up to par when making a difference, and to bump up the issues, set up a strategy, and spike out domestic violence."

CSU Stansialaus' Stop Abuse Campaign is committed to the following goals and principles:
  1.     Educating the campus community about sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking and related issues to raise awareness and promote a non-violent campus community.
  2.     Collaborating with campus and community organizations to develop, communicate, and implement strategies for prevention education and eliminating fear and oppression.
  3.     Supporting the rights of survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, and stalking through advocacy and coordination with campus, local and national resources.
  4.     Ensuring the inclusion of a wide diversity of people as staff, volunteers, peer educators, and constituents, and be culturally accessible to all groups in our work.
  5.     Promoting data collection and research efforts to better educational and service initiatives, and actively participate in the broader academic venue.”
  [post_title] => CSU Stanislaus student athletes take a stand [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => csu-stanislaus-student-athletes-take-stand [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-02-20 12:48:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-02-20 19:48:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3275 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3348 [post_author] => 82 [post_date] => 2015-02-20 12:50:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-02-20 19:50:36 [post_content] => A free panel discussion titled "Ending the Culture of Violence in Schools and College Campuses" will be held on March 19 from 7-9 p.m. at Martin G. Peterson Education Center in Modesto. The panel will include Stanislaus County Sheriff, Adam Christianson, Office of Eduction Superintendent, Tom Changnon, University of Pacific Vice President for Student Life, Patrick Day, Oakland Police Chief, Lester Jenkins, Family Justice Center Executive Director, Tom Ciccarelli and Behavioral Health and Recovery Services Director, Dr. Madelyn Schlaepfer. A committee of members from the Association of American University Women (AAUW) and members of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International, Modesto chapters are organizing the event. The panel discussion is sponsored by both of these group as well as the League of Women Voters and the Stanislaus County of Education. Topics to be discussed are: crime, sexual assault, substance abuse, breakdown of the family unit and mental health. Representatives from community agencies will provide information about resources available to the public. Members of the audience will be given a chance to participate. Kathleen Hailey, the committee member handling publicity for "Ending the Culture of Violence," discussed why the event was organized. "Arlene Jones, a member of AAUW, was motivated by the departure of her granddaughter from college and the recent killing on the campus of University of California, Santa Barbra," Hailey said."The event was born of her concern and conviction that we can make a change." Hailey hopes the fight will not stop at the event. "The event is designed to generate ways to to move our ideas beyond accepting violence as a norm, we do not want to discuss the problem, rather we will determine what steps need to be taken to begin the change in the way our society views these horrific acts of terror toward our children," Hailey said. "It will take many more meetings and gathering of people with the same conviction that change can happen, but the longest journey begins with the first step and we see this event as the first step." She also encourages everyone to attend and add their voice in order to make a difference. "I am sure we all feel that truly "enough is enough," but rather than wringing our hands and saying, 'oh dear, oh my, what shouldn't we do,' come to this beginning event and add your voice or ideas to the mix of many others and make a difference," Hailey said. "The greatest movements started with a small group of individuals. Be the one who makes a difference."   Correction: A Previous version of this article identified the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International incorrectly. It has been corrected here.  [post_title] => Community members Look to end campus violence [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => community-members-look-end-campus-violence [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-02-25 14:54:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-02-25 21:54:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3348 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )
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            [post_date] => 2015-02-25 15:50:44
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            [post_content] => Join David Gardner on Thursday, Feb. 26 for a free informative and entertaining session on money management tips and financial decisions. Gardner will be speaking from 6:30-8 p.m. at Snider Recital Hall at CSU Stanislaus. 

Gardner is the co-founder of The Motley Fool, a financial services company created to educate, amuse and enrich as written on the company website. The Motley Fool prides itself on spreading knowledge about planned, long-term investments guided by Gardner who himself has 20 years of experience identifying companies such as Amazon.com, Netflix and Priceline.com and has served on the Individual Advisory Committee of the New York Stock Exchange for 15 years. 

Those interested in attending should RSVP to 209-667-3131. For the Motley Fool website, visit www.themotleyfool.com.


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            [post_content] => On Friday Feb. 27, the department of music will be putting on the Faculty Chamber Music Concert. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Snider Recital Hall and is open to both students and the public.  Performances will include pieces by Deborah Kavasch, Jeannine Dennis, Joe Mazaferro, Jami Dubberly, Bogdana Mindov, Daniel Davies, Sarah Chan and Jared Eben, ranging in talents from the violin to vocals. The cost is $12 for general admission and $8 for students. All proceeds go to the Department of Music Scholarship Fund.

To purchase tickets visit www.csustan.edu/soa. For additional information, contact the School of the Arts at 209-667-3958.
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            [post_content] => During the week of Feb. 9, Greeks showed off what their organization has to offer in California State University, Stanislaus’ semi-annual rush week.

Rush week is a time where sororities and fraternities recruit potential members in a series of informational nights and activities that let the sisters, brothers and potential members get to know one another. Proceeding the activities, the sorority or fraternity chooses who would fit best while the potential members also make their decision on where they think they belong.

“We try to recruit guys who are interested in helping the community and have that motivation to do well in school,” Victor Flores, president of Tau Kappa Epsilon, said. “We just want to provide a chill environment outside of school and work and we try to show who we are through our info nights and intimate gatherings so they get to know the whole atmosphere.”

Other Greek organizations, such as Delta Phi Gamma (DPG), are voluntarily choosing to not rush for various reasons.

“This semester we just really want to focus on sisterhood and becoming closer with each other,” Veronica Villanueva, president of DPG, said. “We are also in the middle of getting licensed so that we can expand our sorority onto other campuses.”

Pledges— potential members who are rushing an organization— have a lot to choose from considering that there are a total of ten sororities and seven fraternities.

“First I didn’t want to go Greek because of how movies portrayed them,” Mario Pineda (freshman, Political Science) said. “I got interested in the Greek system because most people I met at Stanislaus were Greek and those people always told me about how there was always someone to hang out with. I chose to pledge Omega Nu Omega because they were all so welcoming and treated everyone with respect.”
            [post_title] => Spring 2015 Rush Week ushers in new pledges
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            [post_content] => KCSS Turlock has big goals for 2015. Not only are they working on a compilation album that features local musicians and their original songs, they are looking to incorporate a local artist as well.

The radio station is accepting submissions of any original artwork now through March 9 at 9 a.m. Submissions may be emailed to kcsspromos@gmail.com or brought into the KCSS offices. The staff hopes that the artwork embraces the local music scene to accurately represent the compilation album.

KCSS Station Manager Angelina Moles is always looking for new ways to support the students of CSU Stanislaus.

“I think it’s important for KCSS to incorporate other art forms because music is art, so what better way to incorporate art than through music," Moles said. "We are here for the students; we are the voice of CSU Stanislaus. It is very important that students know that we are here for them."

KCSS looks forward to the ideas from competition participants to help them move forward with the album.

CSU Stanislaus art student Victoria Johnson (senior, Art) shares her artwork in many different galleries throughout the Central Valley and has great respect for all art forms.

“There are so many talented artists at the college and within our community, but not always a vast amount of opportunities for them to showcase their work," Johnson said. "I think this is a great way to give these artists an opportunity. I also think it is extremely important for students to collaborate across departments and network through these types of collaborations."

KCSS looks forward to seeing the art submissions and hopes to utilize a local artist to represent the compilation album. If you have any questions about art submissions contact kcsspromos@gmail.com.
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            [post_date] => 2015-02-19 16:30:43
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            [post_content] => 

The implementation of new standards of security in the dorms in response to the sexual assault that occurred on Jan. 29 is a sign of a promising culture shift at California State University, Stanislaus.

The University Police Department and the administrative staff handled the situation smoothly and with great care. The crime was reported on Feb. 4 and the crime alert went out to students two days later, on Feb. 6.

Although in some life-threatening circumstances, 48 hours would be considered a slow time frame to inform students if they were in danger; in this case it spoke to the amount of detail and attention the officers and staff were paying to the crime and how to inform the public about it.

Unfortunately, statistics show us this is not and will not be an isolated incident. It will happen again.

What this incident does show is the importance of the discussions that are regularly being implemented at our university and in the surrounding community about Title IX, rape culture and campus safety. Whenever a crime like this occurs, the only positivity we can find as a group is the way people come together to offer support and solutions.

We need to continue to push toward the direction of a safer campus in which all members are aware and involved.

As this is a prominent national issue, CSU Stanislaus should serve as an example of solidarity and strength that all institutions of higher education should strive to embody.

This week, look to our articles on page two and eight that provide in greater detail information about this specific incident and the resources and events available to students in regards to campus safety and sexual violence prevention as a whole.

What The Signal wants now is to hear from you. How do you feel about this situation? Do you think the university is handling it appropriately or can they do more?

Please send us letters to the editor at editor@csusignal.com.

[post_title] => Editorial: University sets example of solidarity [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => editorial-university-sets-example-solidarity [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-02-20 13:07:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-02-20 20:07:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3583 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3478 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2015-02-19 16:00:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-02-19 23:00:55 [post_content] =>  Meet your columnists:

Angelina Moles, left, is the Station Manager of KCSS, CSU Stanislaus’ radio station. Erika Anderson, right, is the Promotions Director of KCSS as well as a first-semester staff writer for Humanities and Arts and Entertainment for The Signal.

It is not easy being simply "you" in today's society. With media constantly spreading images of what you should and should not look like and what you should and should not do, being unapologetically "you" is nearly impossible.

But that stops here.

My name is Angelina. I am 21 years old and I am a fat, fearless babe.

At a young age I noticed I was always larger than the other kids, not only in body weight but overall physique. At eight years old I was 5’3 and around 150 pounds. I feared getting weighed in gym class and hated changing with the rest of the girls in the locker room. Even though I have always lived an active lifestyle, playing softball year-round and other physical activities, I have always been “large.” I hated my body and found no self-worth because of my size. I never felt deserving of love, I never felt beautiful and I never felt like I mattered.

But now I see my worth, and now it's your turn.

My name is Erika. I am also 21 years old and I am a determined woman.

I am 5’1 and 110 pounds and people tell me I am very intimidating because of my strong personality. My whole life people have told me that I need to stop cussing, eat more, workout and that I’m too skinny. I have even been asked if I am anorexic. I know that it is easy to judge people and we are all guilty of this, but we need to realize that judgement hurts and we are all beautiful because we are ourselves.

Let us show each other that we are all beautiful and appreciate each other's bodies.

If you are easily offended or feel that there is something wrong with two women speaking their minds about body positivity turn back now.

If you are accepting, willing to listen and learn, you can look to us each week for new information about body positivity, feminism, sex and other hot topics.

If you have any questions or topics you would like Angelina and Erika to feature in their weekly column, you may email notyourgirlss@gmail.com.

    [post_title] => Introducing: Not your girls [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => not-girls [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-02-19 14:40:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-02-19 21:40:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3478 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 13 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3167 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2015-02-05 17:01:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-02-06 00:01:56 [post_content] => Campus culture is developed over time. It is something that changes constantly. The culture at California State University, Stanislaus is much different today than what it was in 1975, or 1985 or even 2005. Even within the past four years there have been important shifts including the growth of the community’s relationship with the university, the effort to stop sexual violence and the improvement of interdepartmental cooperation. All of these are accomplishments, and should not be understated, but there is a crucial cultural shift that needs to occur in direct relation to our hazing story this week and in the work we do at The Signal in general. The Signal is undeniably the biggest fan of our administration as a whole – especially President Sheley and especially the latest team working in the Public Affairs department. With that being said,The Signal wants to see more transparency happen this year in all offices across campus. Transparency is not something that should fall solely on the shoulders of Tim Lynch, Associate Vice President of Communications and Public Affairs. It starts with the student organizations, elected ASI officials, club advisors, our Dean of Students, faculty, staff and every single per-son who works in MSR. Let us give you an example. In the case of the hazing by ODPhi (our cover story), we at The Signal were pleased to learn, after a few vague emails, that the university took the allegations seriously. While we would never expect school administration to reveal the names of perpetrators in an active investigation (un-less criminal charges were brought, which makes it a matter of public record), we do expect transparency when attempting to confirm basic facts. Basic facts like: How many Greek Life chapters have been sanctioned this year and in the past 4 years? Which organizations? Why was each organization sanctioned? Executive Director of the Student Press Law Center, Frank Lamonte, was referenced in an article by the GW Hatchet discussing the importance of the disclosure of information in forming a healthy campus culture. Yet, it was extremely difficult to get confirmation of the most basic facts and impossible to get others. Were it not for Lynch, it is doubtful we would have received what we did. As we strive to provide timely, informative news for our campus community, we want to be able to do so without displaced aggression when trying to work through a lack of transparency. There are two sides to a glass window, but it’s impossible to see through one clean side if the other is still foggy. [post_title] => Transparency: The next step in improving campus culture [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => transparency-next-step-improving-campus-culture [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-02-05 17:01:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-02-06 00:01:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3167 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3169 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2015-02-05 11:08:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-02-05 18:08:36 [post_content] => Welcome back, Warriors! The Signal is ready for a new semester for investigating, discovering and reporting – as I’m sure our fellow students are do-ing the same in their new classes. The Spring 2015 semester means big changes for our paper that we would like to share with you. The start of spring brings with it a rebirth of nature. The smelly trees on campus will be in bloom, more aggressive geese will block our path to class and everyone will visit the Student Health Center for allergy pills. More importantly, and less annoying than these daunting realities, is that The Signal will launch a brand new website. Soon to come is a complete design of csusignal.com that will aid us in our shift to becoming a more online-focused, multimedia platform for news. We will continue to print our paper every other week and still encourage you to pick it up Thursday mornings on your way to class, but we also invite you to take this journey with us into the digital world of media. In addition, our team has doubled this semester, which means we aim to double our presence in every area of coverage as well. We have started out this goal by testing the addition of two new sections in the paper. One of them can be viewed in our paper this week called Neighborhood, which focuses on community news. Keep an eye out for the second new section, which reports on agriculture, science, technology and mathematics, in the weeks to come. Most importantly, we want to reiterate our main goal and promise: we are a student-run newspaper that works to represent the student body and report objectively on the news events, and all other happenings prevalent to the campus community. As always, our main focus and drive is always our readers. Thank you for your support and encouragement, without which our work would not be possible. Best of luck students, faculty and staff in making for yourselves another memorable and successful semester. 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            [post_date] => 2015-02-20 23:39:28
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            [post_content] => CSU Stanislaus baseball faced off against rival Chico State Wildcats Friday night and were unable to walk away with the victory, as they fell short 5-1.

The Warriors (5-6) have not clinched a win at home against the Wildcats (2-2) since 2010.

Tyler Murphy started on the mound and lasted through 7 innings for CSU Stanislaus before being relieved by Martin Gomez.

A highlight for the Warriors came from Klayton Miller's huge catch in left field that robbed the Wildcats of a solo homerun.

Saturday's doubleheader against Chico State starts at noon for games two and three of the series.
            [post_title] => Warriors drop first game of series to Chico State
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            [post_content] => During every California State University, Stanislaus Warrior basketball game, one lucky student gets the opportunity to come onto the court and have the chance to win free Dean's Pizza for a year.

At the men's basketball homecoming game on Feb. 6, Alex Walker (freshman, Kinesiology) made the dream of cheesy goodness come true.

Warriors Assistant Athletics Director, Hung P. Tsai, has worked with Dean's Pizza owner and CSU Stanislaus alumni, Tom Clark, to put on this fun contest.

"We've been doing this for about six to seven years" Clark said. "Normally [we] get one winner a year."

Doing this contest at the Warrior games is something that Clark enjoys and feels is his way to give back to his alma mater.

"I enjoy doing it and being able to watch the 'ooh's and aah's' of people who come close to making it ,"  Clark said.

The rules of the contest state that you have to make a layup, free throw, three pointer and half court shot in about forty-five seconds.  Manage to get all four shots before the buzzer and the person who is competing wins free Dean's Pizza for a year.

Walker was able to get the layup without a problem but missed a few from the line and behind the arc.

"I ended up missing the first two free throws," Walker said.  "So after that I just took a deep breath and made the next one."

Alex rushed over to the half court line which is 47 feet to the basket and in his very first attempt made the basket nothing but net.

"After I released it I wasn't sure that I made it but I heard the crowd screaming,"  Walker said.  "It was crazy... it was a great feeling."

The next chance for someone to add his or her name to the list will be when the Warrior basketball teams return home Feb. 27 as both the men and women host California State University, East Bay.
            [post_title] => Half court shot hero
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            [post_content] =>  

As of Jan. 28, the highly publicized (and criticized) Johnny Manziel, quarterback for the Cleveland Browns, entered a rehabilitation treatment program. Since his years playing college football at Texas A&M, Manziel has been a focal point for sports media outlets nation-wide, earning him the catchy title of “Johnny Football.”

After being selected in the first round of the 2014 NFL draft, fame and fortune have stuck by Manziel’s side like a parasite and it’s host. Much like a parasite, it has seemingly drained the talent and common sense from the once promising superstar.

According to an article from ESPN writer Jeremy Fowler, the morning the Browns were packing up to head to Baltimore to face the rival Ravens, Manziel was not present for the team’s walk-through. Team sources say when team security went to Manziel’s residence to check on him, it was clear he had partied hard the night before. One source even mentioned the words “drunk off his ass.”

It was apparent come season’s end that Manziel needed help, which had led to his recent stay in rehab. This kind of behavior stemmed from his years playing in college, which also brings into question the amounts of stress and pressure college athletes are put through.

This brings up another pressing question: How do athletes here at California State University, Stanislaus handle the pressures of being a student athlete?

The average full-time student at CSU Stanislaus has roughly 4-5 classes (if not more) that accounts for several hours of classwork both inside and outside of the classroom. Throw in another minimum twenty hours for those students with part-time jobs and you have what many consider to be a recipe for stress.

Now, let’s consider the weekly workload of a student athlete. Along with the class time and homework, they have regularly scheduled practices both before and after class, weight room sessions, reviewing game film and game day (which sometimes includes extensive traveling).

“I try to take everything one step at a time,” said Shey Mataele (senior, Kinesiology) from the men’s basketball team. “I try to focus on school first and then basketball.”

A refreshing notion knowing that school still remains the overall priority for our student athletes at CSU Stanislaus, also puts the idea of a normal day of stress into perspective.
            [post_title] => Stress and the student athlete
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            [post_content] => California State University, Stanislaus’s Warrior baseball team started a four game series against the Holy Names University Hawks Feb. 13. After splitting their first six games of the season, the Warriors were in need of a few wins sitting with a 3-3 record heading into Friday’s game.

The Warriors came out strong against the Hawks winning their first game of the series 4-3. With the Warriors down two in the bottom of the eighth inning, junior outfielder Patrick Murly doubled down the right field line bringing the tying run into home. He would later be thrown out trying to advance to home but not before the game defining run came across the plate.

The next two games of the series did not fare as well for the Warriors as they dropped both games 7-8 and 6-7. The later of the two losses came in a grueling 11-inning game, which ended with Holy Names hitting a walk off single against junior pitcher Travis Johnson.

The fourth and final game of their series vs. the Hawks would not be decided by who scored last. After taking an early 2-0 lead in the first inning, CSU Stanislaus took complete control of the game behind senior pitcher David Snapp’s complete game effort. Snapp allowed one run through seven innings of work while striking out four batters and throwing five consecutive scoreless innings to close out the game.

The Warriors will be at home for their next series against the division opponent Chico State Wildcats. The two teams are set to battle it out Feb. 20 starting at 6 p.m. in what is sure to be a great rivalry match to watch.
            [post_title] => Warrior's split series against Holy Names
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            [post_date] => 2015-02-20 14:00:21
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            [post_content] => A recent proposal to build a new student housing community across the street from California State University, Stanislaus has upset local neighbors, leading them to rally together and protest its construction.

Coleraine Capital Group and AMCAL Equities are the driving force behind the project. The apartment complex, which will consist of four, four-story buildings, 680 bedrooms and 560 parking spaces, will be built on the property directly next to the Prime Shine Car Wash and will extend behind Rite-Aid. Located on Monte Vista Avenue between Crowell Road and Dels Lane, the apartment complex will tower over the local neighborhood homes. If approved, the apartments will be the tallest buildings in Turlock.

Patrick Jensen, a Turlock resident, is protesting against the construction. He has posted a sign along the backside of the property that reads, “No 4 Story Apt Here! Call 209-620-4741.”

“I’m all for students and their student housing, and I’m not opposed to apartment complexes, but I think that even a two-story apartment complex would be okay. That way houses can still be given privacy,” Jensen said. “No matter what kind of curtains you put up, with those illuminated parking lots anyone is going to be able to see into your house. When college kids get together there’s parties, late night drinking, throwing up in parking lots. These people living here are all retirees, you know.”

Jensen stated he has no secret agenda and has support from other community members. So far, Jensen has collected over 60 signatures of those who oppose the construction of the new student housing and hopes that an agreement can be reached where everyone involved is happy.

While Jensen is worried about peace and privacy, he also worries about property value.

“My in-laws have lived there since day one," Jensen said. "That’s their retirement home. If you’ve got a four-story apartment building looking into your backyard, your property value will plummet.”

The president of Coleraine Capital Group, David Moon, is aware of the neighborhood unrest and in response held a neighborhood meeting on Jan. 27 to present and discuss their preliminary site plan. The neighbors asked questions and pointed out their areas of concern. According to Moon, the company has since modified their plans in order to address concerns expressed at the meeting.

“The Vista purpose-built student housing community will be designed and operated in order to create a positive, healthy, living-learning environment exclusively for CSUS students,” Moon said.

The new housing complex will have computer labs, study rooms, a swimming pool, fitness center and countless other amenities. Shuttles will also be available to take students to and from campus. Moon also pointed out the security features of the complex, which include a gated perimeter, card key access for every door and security cameras located throughout the property.

Despite protest from the neighbors, these features of the proposed new building sound enticing to current CSU Stanislaus students.

“I’m glad they’re building it," Eddy Luna (junior, Biology) said. "I know the neighbors are upset, but they have to realize that this is a college town, and the school is going to expand. I think it’s great for the school and a great opportunity for future students that may be able to live in it. I would live in it."

As for the university’s involvement in the prospective project, Director of Housing and Residential Life Jennifer Humphrey stated that the university is aware of the project and looking into possible implications for the school.

According to Moon, students may not have to wait too long for the project to begin construction.

“Subject to the required local and state entitlement and permitting process, we would plan to be under construction in the first quarter of 2016, with a projected occupancy of Fall 2017,” Moon said.

Moon plans to submit his updated plans to the city in the next three weeks in hopes that the neighbors will be pleased with the changes. Though, it may be hard to get Patrick Jensen to take down his protest sign.

“I don’t believe anything (Moon) is saying," Jensen said. "He’s a polished, slick salesman trying to talk about only the positive and not bring up any of the negative.”

 
            [post_title] => Student apartment proposal causes protest
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            [post_content] => It is a late Wednesday afternoon, and the glittering eyes of a woman who has been here since 8 AM peek up from behind a mass of dark curls. Her name is Valorie Brown, and she is a woman with hundreds of thousands of worlds at her fingertips. A cascade of golden light floods the room in which she stands, only adding to the delicate majesty that already permeates the bookstore.

Located at 141 North Center Street in downtown Turlock, Brown and her husband Tim opened Lightly Used Books in 2010, a decision that she explains was impulsive.

“My husband had too many books and I had too many books and we both like business so we thought we’d try it,” Brown says. Since first opening their doors, the Browns have expanded their floor space to accommodate their ever growing supply of books.

A walk through the bookstore finds customers transported everywhere from the halcyon days of their youth, where they are rubbing elbows with Alice and the Mad Hatter at tea time, to complicated love triangles in modern day New York. Brown and her husband have been able to curate their collection of books over the years with the help of people who bring in their own.

“Some days we don’t get many books, some days I might get twenty boxes of books, but on average, I would say we get about seven boxes of books a day,” Brown says.

[caption id="attachment_3513" align="alignnone" width="387"]Photo by Andrea Paz/Signal Photo by Andrea Paz/Signal[/caption]

Twenty years worth of decor, mostly acquired from swap meets and antique stores, line the walls and bookshelves of Lightly Used Books. The books are nestled in bookshelves that the Brown family built themselves while Valorie is also responsible for staining one of the bookcases by hand, an impressive feat that she admits with astounding humility.

“It took a lot of time, but not as long as you’d think,” Brown says. “We worked hard, and we had help.” The care and time that has been invested is immediately apparent.

Brown places her copy of The Black Company by Glen Cook down on the counter in front of her as she ponders the future of her bookstore.

“Oh, I’d love to have more business and have more people come in. The longer we’re in business, the more I’m aware of what books people need. When you’re going through the boxes, there’s certain books you know you need to have, because everybody needs A Child Called It. I can spot those books a lot faster now, and I always try to get those whenever I can in order to meet the needs of people,” she says.

There is a young girl running her fingers along the books that are laden with sleep as the store approaches closing time, and there is such a fierce determination in her walk which inevitably evokes in me a sense of intrigue. What is she so intent on finding? I do not ask her, but I recall Brown telling me that although there is no pigeonhole for her customers, most of them are gentle, sensitive people. I say my goodbyes to Brown, thank her for her time, and leave, certain that whatever the young girl was looking for, she will find within the recesses of trembling spines and words immortalized with the knowledge that one day, someone would look for them.

[caption id="attachment_3512" align="alignnone" width="1024"]Photo by Andrea Paz/Signal Photo by Andrea Paz/Signal[/caption]
            [post_title] => Community Spotlight: Lightly Used Books
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            [post_date] => 2015-02-19 18:29:50
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            [post_content] => Ripon once held the record for being home to the most almond trees per capita.  The self-proclaimed "Almond Capital of the World" is celebrating its 53rd Annual Almond Blossom Festival (ABF) this weekend.  Admiring the pink and white beauty of the orchards in full bloom is only part of the tradition.  

People congregate from all around the neighboring towns to partake in classic carnival rides, miscellaneous vendor booths and a community parade, but the events do not stop there.

[caption id="attachment_3591" align="alignnone" width="2592"]Scott Sikma/Signal Scott Sikma/Signal[/caption]

Ripon always celebrates the ABF during the last weekend in February and this year it goes from Thursday the 19th to Sunday the 22nd.

The morning Bake Off kick-starts the pre-weekend fun on Feb. 19 with delicious goodies that will appease appetites until the Lion's Club Spaghetti Dinner.  Feb. 19 also marks Carnival $1 Night at the Mistlin Sports Park from 4-10 p.m.  Carnival vendor booths will be open during the Festival on Feb. 20-22.

Other festivities include the Art Exhibit on Feb. 20 and 21, the American Legion Auxiliary Breakfast on Feb. 21, as well as the Ripon QB Club's "Bratts and Beer," the Saturday morning Fun Run, the afternoon parade and much more.

For details on the parade route or other information, please contact the Ripon Chamber of Commerce or visit their website.

Perhaps unconventional, though I would like to give a shout-out to the Diaper Derby, which is a crawling-only race for infants under 12 months.  Yours truly actually won the 32nd Annual Almond Blossom Diaper Derby in 1994 (if I may, it wasn't even close).  This year the Diaper Derby will be held on Feb. 21 from 10-11 a.m. at Ripon High School.

Make your way to Ripon this weekend and join in on the celebration.  You can see the Ferris wheel from the Jack Tone exit.

[caption id="attachment_3592" align="alignnone" width="2592"]Scott Sikma/Signal Scott Sikma/Signal[/caption]
            [post_title] => Awesome Blossom weekend
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            [post_date] => 2015-02-12 11:30:42
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            [post_content] => Turlock City Council members met on  Jan. 27 to vote on approving a resolution that would enforce the original ban on smoking in public parks that was enacted in January of 2003.  A 5-0 vote determined that the resolution would remain in force and be upheld.

At its genesis, this twelve-year-old resolution was intended to specifically ban smoking in city parks, public facilities and parking lots.  The updated resolution has extended the limits of this ban to include electronic cigarettes and vaporizers and any other products that may contain tobacco.

According to the Turlock Parks, Arts and Recreation Commission (PARC), it is through the use of signs posted in public parks and facilities, and additionally through the use of education, that the city hopes to put a stop to smoking in public places.  Similar steps have been taken by neighboring cities such as Patterson in an effort to eliminate the pollution of the air at the hand of tobacco products.

Exposure to secondhand smoke has often been linked to health problems such as asthma, coronary heart disease, strokes, lung cancer and sudden infant death syndrome among other problematic health conditions.  Secondhand smoke is especially dangerous for young children, women who are pregnant and the elderly.

Through the enforcement of the ban on smoking in city parks, Turlock residents will no longer have to compromise their health to make use of local recreation areas, and adherence to the ban on behalf of Turlock residents will ensure the elimination of exposure to secondhand smoke.

 
            [post_title] => Turlock smoking ban upheld
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            [post_content] => Approximately 25 student and faculty members of the Agricultural Department held a Meet and Greet at the Events Center of California State University, Stanislaus on Feb. 5.

The Meet and Greet was held from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. to allow students and instructors to get to know each other on a more personal level and establish relationships early in the semester.

Both the staff and students had time to get to know one another over various games including card games like Old Maid.  Heath Sousa, club president of the Agricultural Department, also took the opportunity to welcome students, especially those who were new to CSU Stanislaus. Sousa also took the opportunity, near the end of the gathering, to introduce the alumni who joined them for that evening.

Because of the often busy life of those who work in agricultural or farm-related jobs, many students don't have much of an opportunity to get to know one another at CSU Stanislaus' Agriculture department. It is because of this that the Meet and Greet takes place, allowing those of such busy lifestyles a chance to pause and get to know those with whom they would be working.

"On top of having to get to know our instructors, we also don't get to really know each other that well," Nina Ferretti of the Agriculture Department [Awaiting verification of this title] said. "The goal [of the Meet and Greet] is to build connections with each other because those are really important when you're going out into the work world.

If you have that person who you have that networking connection with, then you can find a job a little bit more easily."

The ultimate goal of the Meet and Greet was to establish networks that can help students further down the road.
            [post_title] => Agriculture Department meet and greet
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            [post_content] => Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Program (LSAMP) held their first meeting of the semester in the South Dining Hall Feb. 12.

The meeting was led by Dr. Melanie Martin, Associate Professor for the department of Computer Science, and was a great way to welcome back Science and Math scholars as well as get reacquainted with peers and professors.

Dr. Martin laid out some upcoming events, talked about financial assistants, wanted to know who was graduating and she also talked about beginning research for entrance to graduate school.

Four students already began their research in the Fall and shared what they have been working on during the meeting.

The first participant was senior Brandon Halpin who conducted research on “Autonomous Quadcopter Flight,” funded by Central Valley Math and Science Alliance (CVMSA). The main purpose is to control any communication and intercept it through this technology. To have this technology, Halpin is trying to figure out more about the MAVProxy- since it is the center of all the control. This Autonomous Quadcopter can also help in agriculture to help determine crops well being. Some future work he mentioned was environmental awareness, obstacle detection and surveying.

Guadalupe Calvillo was the second participant.  With the help of Silvia Klein, a student, and Dr. Elvin Aleman, her research was “Photophysical Characterization of free Base Corrole and Solvent Effect.”  The main concept here is to understand porphyrins and corroles; they are tetrapriollic molecules and by using the UN-Visible spectra 15 they are efficient at absorbing light. Future work for Calvillo and associates is continuing to study the UN-V's spectra.

Next was “Synthesis of Subedamine A” by Carol Cervas. This can act as a poison from other pray, it could be an antibiotic if they synthesize it and it can possibly help treat cancer. When using this during research, Cervas made it clear the solvents must be carefully removed from the chemistry flasks or the research could be destroyed.

Last was “Topic Segmentation and Text Coherence Detection in Wikipedia Using Latent Semantic Analysis” by Martin Torress; advised by Dr. Martin. This research allows quick parsing of HTML documents. Torress started with a matrix when creating a semantic space in which 300 dimensions are for matrix decomposition. LSA abstract words from the number build behind websites and is used for search engines and social networking. Information retrieval is what this was originally used for.

All of this interesting, informative research from LSAMP students was presented with free pizza and refreshments.
            [post_title] => Welcome back and Research
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            [post_content] => California State University, Stanislaus held their fourth annual Science Day on Feb. 7 at the Naraghi Hall of Science.

The event is a fun way for kids to not only participate in activities but to educate themselves on different forms of science and math.

Science Day hosts various science activities and mini museums for individuals to see. Mainly families with young children participate in the events. Math, Biology, Chemistry, Nursing and Psychology majors normally participate in the event.

As community members entered Naraghi they received a pamphlet and stamp card which allowed them the opportunity to win a free prize.

Each level in the building had activities. The first floor featured activities such as rocks and minerals, fossils, mechanics, planetarium and light waves. The second floor consisted of animal adaptation, day among the lives of parasites, fun with math, heart hotwheels, the living cell and ball pythons. The third floor activities included build an atom, electric orbs, light producing microbes and "Who done it."

A crowd favorite seemed to be petting the huge turtle that was outside of the entrance to Naraghi.

“I like to help people be educated on fossils,” Whitney Wilson, event staff, said. “They do not have the accessibility and knowledge on it.”

Dr. Mark Grobner, event organizer and an Biology instructor, shared some thoughts on the day as well.

“We typically have around 2,000+ visitors to campus for Science Day, Dr. Grobner said. “ I see retired couples to strollers at the event with many families making it a day.  It is open to the community. I assume most of the participants are from Turlock, but we advertise to the surrounding communities and have had schools bring in busloads of kids for the day.”

 
            [post_title] => Fourth Annual Science Day a success
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            [post_content] => The Agricultural Studies department held a meet and greet on Feb. 5 where about 25 students and faculty members had the opportunity to get to know each other on a more personal level and establish relationships early in the semester.

Both staff and students played various games including card games like Old Maid. Heath Sousa, club president of the Agricultural Studies department, also took the opportunity to welcome students, especially those who were new to CSU Stanislaus. Sousa also took the opportunity near the end of the gathering to introduce the alumni who joined them for the evening.

Because of the often busy life of those who work in agricultural or farm-related jobs, many students don't have much of an opportunity to get to know one another at CSU Stanislaus' Agricultural Studies department. It is because of this that the Meet and Greet took place, allowing those of such busy lifestyles a chance to pause and get to know those with whom they would be working.

"On top of having to get to know our instructors, we also don't get to really know each other that well," said Nina Ferretti, student assistant for the Agricultural Studies department.

"The goal  is to build connections with each other because those are really important when you're going out into the work world. If you have that person who you have that networking connection with, then you can find a job a little bit more easily."
            [post_title] => Agriculture department connects students with teachers
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