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            [post_date] => 2015-03-27 22:35:38
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-28 05:35:38
            [post_content] => In the President's Update for March 16, 2015, California State University, Stanislaus' president Joseph F. Sheley has stated that the university's budget will be facing challenges for 2015-2016.
The University Budget Advisory Committee (UBAC) is beginning to look at the current situation and assess what can be done. With this, the university recognizes there will not be much new funding for the upcoming year.
"I have asked UBAC and the Vice Presidents to examine the balance in our expenditures between ongoing state funding and reserves," President Sheley said in his update. "Little or no new state funding is coming our way, and Prop 30 relief begins to sunset in a year."
As of now, much of CSU Stanislaus' budget goes towards employee compensation. While it has increased, the employees are top priority.
"Although our campus budget has increased relative to that of the past several years, most of the added funding must go to mandatory cost increases such as health and retirement benefits and compensation for employees," Michelle Legg, University Budget Manager, said. "Any funding for enrollment growth will go toward additional class sections."
UBAC and the Vice Presidents of the university are working together to examine the budget. With this, they will determine the best way to put it to use.
"Against this backdrop, I have asked UBAC and the Vice Presidents to examine the balance in our expenditures between ongoing state funding and reserves…" President Sheley said. "We must budget conservatively and approach our financial obligations[…]"
As of now, the top concern for the university and their budget is to make sure they keep all programs and staff to satisfy students.
"Our primary concern is to begin planning now to ensure we can maintain excellent programs and protect the employees we currently have who give our students their best each and every day," Legg said.
The next few weeks will be set aside for budget talks at CSU Stanislaus. UBAC and the Vice Presidents will work together to answer any questions and seek advice throughout divisions.
"We want to enter 2015-16 with the confidence that comes from understanding well our assets, our commitments, and our challenges."
            [post_title] => University's top budget concerns are student satisfaction, programs
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            [post_date] => 2015-03-27 22:29:50
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            [post_content] => Stanislaus Christian Fellowship, also know as Chi Alpha, has recently lost their recognition as an official student organization at California State University, Stanislaus.

Associate Vice President of Communications and Public Affairs, Tim Lynch, explained why this decision was made.

"All recognized student organizations must comply with California state law and CSU policies, which prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, religion, natural origin, color, age, gender, marital status, citizenship, sexual orientation or disability," Lynch said. "Stanislaus Christian Fellowship's constitution, as currently written, permits discrimination on religious and other grounds for both its voting members and those filling leadership positions."

"The University is not saying the organization engages in discrimination, but the constitution as currently written would allow it, and that would violate Executive Order 1068 and California state law."

Assemblywoman Shannon Grove (R-Bakersfield) proposed a bill called the Student Freedom of Association Act. The bill was proposed to fight the "Open Membership Policy", a policy that requires that membership and leadership positions within recognized student organizations be open for all students, even if those students disagree with the purpose or beliefs of the club. (To learn more about the proposed bill, click here.)

 

The policy lost Stanislaus Christian Fellowship their recognition. Lynch was asked what would happen if this bill came into effect.

"It would be premature to speculate on any proposed legislation," Lynch said.

Stanislaus Christian Fellowship will still be allowed to engage with the campus.

"Non-recognized student organizations are welcome to meet on campus and engage in student life," Lynch said. "What they cannot do is avail themselves of the privileges that recognized student organizations do."

Organizations that are recognized by the university have different privileges versus organizations that are not recognized.

"Recognized student organizations have several privileges on campus, such as the ability to reserve space for activities, use a mailbox in the Office of Student leadership and Development, and gain access to certain accounting services," Lynch said. "Such privileges are underwritten by student fees and California tax payers; therefore, all recognized student organizations must refrain from discriminatory practices. More than 50 student organizations, including two that are faith-based, are recognized."

Lynch explained the university is not trying to interfere with Christian Fellowships's leadership selection.

"Every student organization is free to craft its own policies for the selection of leaders, as long as those policies are non-discriminatory and applied equally," Lynch said.

The university is also not trying to deny the organization's freedom of religion rights.

"The university would never discriminate against any group because it is religious in nature," Lynch said. "However, the University must comply with CSU policy and state law, which prohibit discrimination in recognized student organizations."

 
            [post_title] => Chi Alpha loses recognition from university, proposed bill hopes to fight against similar cases
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            [post_date] => 2015-03-25 08:00:39
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-25 15:00:39
            [post_content] => California State University, Stanislaus has taken measures to reduce the risk of an illness outbreak.  With recent cases of foreign-born disease, the CSU Chancellor’s office is reviewing emergency operations should there be a widespread infection.

One area of more concern than the current fear of Ebola is with diseases like meningitis that are more likely to appear in a college setting.

In less than a week’s time, 18-year-old Sara Stelzer, San Diego State student, had gone from experiencing flu-like symptoms to relying on life support, to being confirmed dead.

According to Fox news, the San Diego State student contracted a meningococcal infection in October of last year despite being vaccinated, resulting in meningitis. The disease is commonly seen in close living quarters and causes inflammation of tissue surrounding the brain and spinal cord.

NBC San Diego said a second student from Pennsylvania Drexel University died last year from the same bacteria after coming into contact with Princeton students who had meningococcal disease.

“The likelihood of Ebola is pretty well zero," Dr. Schott Hennes, Director of the Student Health Center, said. "Now, mumps and measles and meningitis, those are the biggest risks for campuses that I have more concerns about. Our biggest risk, well a risk, is meningitis.  It's a bacteria that seems to present itself where people are more concentrated.”

In the case of an outbreak on campus, CSU Stanislaus would be in close contact with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to determine the best action for the scenario.

“Well we do have isolation rooms,” said Hennes.  “We would contact the county health officials which work in conjunction with the CDC and follow their advice from there.  So we do have procedures we would implement if a student walked through our door infected.”

CSU Chancellor Timothy White said the campuses are reviewing and updating plans for handling disease which Dr. Hennes said may include tighter requirements for immunizations.

The CSU currently only requires MMR (Measles, Mumps and rubella) and Hepatitis B which may be changing in light of recent disease outbreaks.  The problem, though, may be greater than a vaccine can solve.

Hennes said many students like Sara Seltzer were vaccinated for Meningitis A in junior high, yet contracted the disease in the form of a different strain (Meningitis B).  He said the same may be true for the flu which has a nature of mutating.

“The flu this year has drifted in its genetic makeup,” Hennes said.  “The flu shot people got covered some, but not all of the flu.  Only about 12 percent of those vaccinated were completely protected.”

With the unpredictable nature of a disease, avoiding illness is more focused around prevention rather than eliminating infection once it is already present.

“That is the first line of defense and prevention, just basic hygiene," Hennes said. "Hand washing is the best thing we could all do, that is what we really mostly emphasize. Wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands."

Risk management, housing, student affairs, public relations and the health center meet together frequently to discuss scenarios that could happen and how to better educate students.  In addition, the Student Health Advisory Committee (SHAC) serves the student body be interfacing between students, the health

In addition, the Student Health Advisory Committee (SHAC) serves the student body interfacing between students, the Health Center and the university president.  SHAC is comprised of students and has been present in the quad and visited classrooms to inform other students of the Health Center’s location and services.

Collaborating with university departments and the CDC is center to constructing a plan should there be hazard.  Dr. Hennes says though cleanliness comes first, the university is prepared to take action when need be, acknowledging each situation will require different measures.

“For any communicable disease, there are so many different scenarios," Hennes said. "You want to anticipate the event the best you can so you’re not caught flat-footed.  We want to educate people the best we can to not be afraid, we want to have an orchestrated response.”
            [post_title] => Disease outbreaks: Director of Student Health Center emphasizes prevention
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            [post_modified] => 2015-03-26 21:17:20
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            [post_date] => 2015-03-24 21:07:57
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            [post_content] => Associated Students Inc. held an event titled "Dine With ASI" that focused on their student success campaign. Attendees were served breakfast for dinner and were able to have one-on-one conversations with ASI board members at the March 24 event.

ASI Director for Student Organizations Sandra Loza (junior, Sociology) was seen talking to students about what success means to them and how it can better be improved at California State University, Stanislaus.

“It was just really exciting to see students come out and willing to talk to you and tell you what we need on our campus," Loza said. "This is what we are lacking and this gives us something to work to improve and make stuff better here for our students. We need direction from our students to know what to do."

At the event, there was a total of six tables each with two board members who talked to students about the meaning of student success.

They layout of the event was meant to provide an intimate experience with the students who were not aware of the student success campaign.

“I honestly did not know what it was for, but I think it was cool," Yari Martinez (junior, Liberal Studies) said. "It’s a good way to advertise to students because once they get here you can tell them since they are waiting.

For more information on the student success campaign, you can either contact ASI Vice President Marvin Hooker at asvicepresident@csustan.edu or ASI Student Government Coordinator Victor Flores at asistudgovt@csustan.edu .

 
            [post_title] => ASI serves breakfast for dinner and talks student success
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            [post_date] => 2015-03-27 16:50:44
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-27 23:50:44
            [post_content] => Allergies have taken the Central Valley by storm this season and people all over are suffering from debilitating allergy symptoms. The dry air and dust have settled in early this year, and as the agricultural area we live in begins to harvest, we will have to find alternative ways to deal with these allergy symptoms.

Sneezing, wheezing and the constant itching from allergies is something that is seen all over campus this time of year and can make your life uncomfortable. Many people suffering from seasonal allergies look to different forms of relief to help them overcome allergies and get through their days of work and school.

The Student Health Center is available Monday through Friday to assist current students with any health care needs. Those looking to soothe their allergy symptoms with an anti-histamine or decongestant can visit the Health Center Pharmacy. Benadryl, Zyrtec, Claritin and Mucinex offer great relief for the everyday allergy symptoms. The Student Health Center can be reached at 209-667-3396.

In a campus announcement sent to faculty and staff of CSU Stanislaus, Dr. Sergio Mazon, chief of medical staff at the Student Health Center, gave some helpful tips to help with seasonal allergies.

“Springtime allergies or allergic rhinitis are definitely irritating," Mazon said. "If you are not sure whether you have a cold or an allergy, it’s always OK to seek medical evaluation. We can treat you appropriately and refer you to an allergy specialist if needed."

The Student Health Center also recommends vacuuming frequently and avoiding trees pollinating and freshly cut grass.

The most common fix for allergy symptoms are medications and even though these can help with allergies, they also can have many negative side affects and leave you drowsy. Many people look for alternative remedies for allergies and a popular form of allergy relief has been seen in the NetiPot and the use of local honey.

Nursing student Maggie Fabry suffers from severe allergies and has looked to natural remedies to give her some relief.

Fabry explained that honey local to where you live is a great way to help prevent allergies because it exposes you to the allergens you may be susceptible to during the allergy season. Though honey is a great way to prepare you for the allergy season, this method should not be used with children.

"I get terrible allergies," Fabry said. "I have a tablespoon of honey twice a day in my tea, but I also use Claritin."

Fabry also explained the benefits of using the NetiPot, "It treats congestion and clears your sinuses which are results of allergies."

The NetiPot is a product that can be purchased at most drugstores and comes with a plastic or ceramic teapot-styled device and small packages of saline solution. NetiPot users are instructed to use only distilled water to protect their sinuses and provide the best experience. Once the saline solution has been mixed in the NetiPot, the user rotates it back and forth between nostrils, irrigating the nasal passages while breathing in and out through the mouth. While the first few uses can make users uncomfortable, the lasting affect of a sinus rinse will leave allergy sufferers feeling refreshed.

As a student of CSU Stanislaus, if you are suffering from the Valley killer this allergy season, utilize the Student Health Center to get the relief you need. Use their helpful tips and learn to cope with your symptoms and take control of your health.

[caption id="attachment_4801" align="aligncenter" width="581"]CSU Stanislaus Health Center Pharmacy List CSU Stanislaus Health Center Pharmacy List[/caption]

            [post_title] => Death By Allergies: the Valley killer strikes again
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            [post_date] => 2015-03-27 15:53:09
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            [post_content] => Easter is coming up and the Ladies of Phi Sigma Sigma are hosting their 16th Annual Easter Egg Hunt in the Quad on March 28. 

The event provides a free entry and invites the campus community to participate. Children of all ages are welcome and each age group will complete the hunt at different times. The first hunt, the ages 0 to 3 group, will begin at 11:30 a.m. They'll be followed by the 4 to 6 age group at 11:45 a.m. The 7 to 9 age group hunts at 12 p.m. and the event finishes with the 10 to 14 age group at 12:15 p.m.

The day will feature games, activities, raffles, face painting, food and pictures with the Easter bunny. Attendees should make sure to bring their own basket and be prepared to win a special prize if the golden egg is found.

All proceeds will go to the Phi Sigma Sigma Foundation that benefits School and College Readiness. Don't miss out on this annual event promising family and friends a day full of fun.
            [post_title] => Phi Sigma Sigma's Easter Egg Hunt promises family fun
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            [post_date] => 2015-03-27 15:38:22
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            [post_content] => As spring break is fast approaching it is no surprise that schedules are occupied. Various Greek Organizations on campus have had a busy week. The week began with the Greek God Games hosted by the coed fraternity of Omega Nu Omega, part of the first ONO week for the fraternity. 

The Greek God Games were composed of an obstacle course completed by teams of  competitors participating in  both physical and mental activities. Winners received a prize, and gift baskets were also being raffled during the week. The Greek God Games ended on Wednesday and a BBQ was held at the quad for the campus community to enjoy.

As the week continues, the gentlemen of Theta Chi will be celebrating their Founders Day on March 29. The event will be celebrating 159 years of excellence for the fraternity along with friends and family. The celebration will be held on campus in the quad area as members of the Eta Tau chapter will celebrate their founding day of April 10, 1856.

Stay tuned for more upcoming events held by the Greek Organizations on campus.
            [post_title] => Keeping the week Greek with ONO and Theta Chi
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            [post_date] => 2015-03-24 10:37:00
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            [post_content] => Students were invited to celebrate the University Student Union's 37th birthday on March 18. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the USU provided students with hotdogs, chips, drinks, cotton candy, snow cones, popcorn, root beer floats and many different games and activities all for free.

Mechanical bull rides, magic tricks from a professional magician, stilt walkers and countless games of musical chairs the USU Birthday Bash showcased a classic carnival setting for students of CSU Stanislaus.

CSU Stanislaus student Nandi Mathews, enjoyed the event and appreciated the fun environment that the Birthday Bash provided to students.

[gallery type="rectangular" size="medium" ids="4474,4480,4478,4479,4477,4476,4475"]

"I do think the 37th Bash was a great event for college students to congregate and enjoy games and events that could take them away from their studies in a safe and fun environment," Mathews (junior, Cognitive Studies) said.

For students facing midterms this week, the Birthday Bash was a great way for students to get out and have a break from studying to enjoy this fun event.

"My favorite part of the event was not only the chance to get free delicious and filling food but also the music that kept the vibe fun and relaxing while incorporating competitive games and opportunities to win cool prizes [...] which allowed me to release any stressors and just kick back and enjoy the social aspect of college," Mathews said.

USU Events Coordinator Rita Gouda could be seen all over the event making sure that everything was perfect for students to enjoy.

[gallery type="rectangular" size="medium" ids="4481,4487,4486,4485,4484,4483,4482"]

"I think the event went great," Gouda said. "Being the person that planned this event, naturally I will notice things that others won't. But it seems that everyone enjoyed it and that's more than I can ask for[...] I think we had a lot of different forms of entertainment and activities to hopefully spark a diversity of people's interest."

Gouda expressed her excitement towards planning this event and how successful the Birthday Bash was, but also realizes that as a student, event planning of this size can be a challenge.

"It’s been a crazy and hectic two months leading up the Birthday Bash," Gouda said. "Being my first semester in programming staff, I really wanted to make it an amazing event. I hope the Birthday Bash reflected on USU, that we notice the minute details and we’re here for the students to enjoy and grow off of. I really want to note how much I appreciate all the support physically and emotionally through out this process and the event day itself. It wouldn’t have been possible without all the help I got."

[gallery type="rectangular" size="medium" ids="4488,4496,4494,4493,4492,4491,4490,4489"]
            [post_title] => Step right up: USU Birthday Bash wows students
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            [post_content] => The Signal staff was concerned with a video posted on the Stanislaus Sophi Facebook page on March 23 in association with the sorority's Women's Symposium, which focuses on women empowerment. The video included fraternity members describing their "ideal woman." We found the video to be counterproductive to the message that the sorority's annual symposium has traditionally delivered quite successfully. Many members of the campus community shared our opinion. Watch our alternative video to find who we think ranks as an ideal person.

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJaswIq2gTs&feature=youtu.be[/embed]

 
            [post_title] => Video: Campus community members discuss empowerment
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            [post_date] => 2015-03-11 10:55:58
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-11 17:55:58
            [post_content] => 

This is a letter written by the "Not Your Girls" columnists in response to a Letter to the Editor written by a concerned reader questioning the choice of the women to pose in lingerie.

Hello Carrie!

Thank you for the positive reinforcement on our article Not Your Girls. While reading your comments and concerns I couldn’t help but to agree.

As we went through the process of coming up with a photo idea and choosing just one, we were both struggling with what to do. We were both aware that peers, professors, family, and members of the surrounding community would view this image.

We both took into account the positive and negative comments we would receive with such a controversial topic. And this is exactly why we chose the photo with us both in our undergarments. We feel as though this society puts too much pressure on women to “cover up” but we view women and men both on the beach or at a pool with a revealing or modest bathing suit. We posed the question “What is the difference between us being in our bathing suits or us being in our bra and underwear?”

Our answer was simply nothing.

Whether we were in a bra and underwear or our two piece bathing suits, we would be showing the same amount of skin. We chose the undergarment photo to represent the fact that no matter what we wear, no matter how much we show OR how little we show, the human body, specifically the woman’s body, will be mocked, judged, devalued, sexualized, or praised.

We believe that the messages we have and are continuing to convey in our article will show our intelligence.

As women, we deserve to be taken seriously by what we bring to the table, not by what we wear. We should be treated like ladies, because we are ladies.

We should be respected because we are human beings. We, as intelligent, strong-willed young women, hope that this article is a stepping stone to realizing that barriers, such as how we dress or look, need to be taken down before they take us down.  If someone is focussed on how amazing we look in our skivvies and take what we have to say for granted, then they have missed the message in the article.

We are not defined by our outfits.

We are not defined by our weight.

We are not defined by the societal views that have brought so many women down.

We are defined by our own definitions of who we are.

I hope you continue to read our articles and enjoy the boundaries that we break!

Thank you!

Sincerely,

Not Your Girls

[post_title] => E&A reply: Columnists respond to reader's concerns [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ea-reply-columnists-respond-readers-concerns [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-11 10:53:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-11 17:53:28 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=4170 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4168 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2015-03-11 10:41:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-11 17:41:55 [post_content] =>

Reading the issue dated 2/19/2015, I am impressed with the wide variety and professionalism of the articles.

I've worked on campus for 27 years, and the Signal has never looked better.  I do have a question about the article on Body Positivity.  Absolutely, I agree with everything written in the article and appreciate their honest and genuine thoughts.

However, I wonder if the women realize by posing only in their lingerie, understand that some men, and perhaps women, reading the article might get the wrong idea?

Especially since on the same page there is an article against sexual assault.  Their point could have been clearly made had they dressed in a modest bathing suit, workout clothing, or simply a t-shirt and shorts.

When they interact with faculty, staff and peers, will they be met with someone remembering what they look like in their lingerie, or taken seriously like the intelligent, striking women they are?

As women, if we want to be treated like a lady and be respected, we need to convey that with our dress, words and actions.  The young women have some great things to say, and I admire them for bringing to light and discussing these sensitive topics.

Carrie Dugovic

Database/PeopleSoft

Administrator, OIT

Read the columnists respond to the letter here.

[post_title] => Letter to the Editor: Is lingerie the best choice? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => letter-editor-lingerie-best-choice [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-11 10:58:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-11 17:58:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=4168 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3979 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2015-03-06 15:00:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-06 22:00:29 [post_content] => The word “Feminist” has always seemed to have a bad reputation. So today, let’s finally get it straight. What does the being a feminist mean? When a man or a woman claims to be a feminist they have one goal in mind: equality of the sexes. To be a feminist does not mean you have to be a woman. Let that sink in. Equality of the sexes is something that involves both women and men. As a feminist, the ultimate goal is to have women and men treated equally. Whether it is in a work setting, a social setting, or a political setting, equality is necessary. Some women who consider themselves to be feminists have been type-casted and stereotyped into women who are anti-male and believe that women are the dominant sex. While there might be some women and men who do believe this, this idea has nothing to do with feminism at its core. Women and men who believe in this false premise continue to limit feminist’s progression. These stereotyped beliefs are chronic issues that seem to never fade away when considering yourself a feminist. Men and women can both fight for equality of the sexes. A man can be a feminist. A woman can be a feminist. Anyone can be a feminist. Being a feminist is not labeling you. We, as feminists, fight for social justice. We stand for equity of the sexes. Feminism is not a gender, it is not a label. Feminism is equality.     [post_title] => Not Your Girls: Feminism is not a gender [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => not-girls-3 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-11 10:55:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-11 17:55:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3979 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw ) )
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            [post_content] => The CSU Stanislaus Warrior cheer team placed fourth overall at the USA Collegiate Nationals in Anaheim this past weekend

This is the first year the squad has competed in Nationals and it has the potential to be a new tradition.

“It is definitely something that we want to set our foundation on,”  Michael DeGuzman, Head Coach of the cheer team, said. “This is a competition squad and we love to compete.”

[caption id="attachment_4619" align="alignnone" width="300"]Photo courtesy of Corina Basso. Photo courtesy of Corina Basso.[/caption]

The tournament hosted teams from schools all over the nation.  The competition was set so four year schools competed against each other and two year schools did the same. This allowed for big name Division I schools, such as Arizona State University, San Jose State University and Boise State University to all potentially compete against our Warrior cheer team.

“It’s unique because the name of the school doesn’t dictate what level of competition you will bring,” DeGuzman said. “It is the program that you develop and the people who are in it that make you what you are.”

The cheer team had also qualified for Nationals on the East Coast earlier in the year but focused on the competition in Anaheim.

The squad has 22 cheerleaders on the roster, five of them being seniors.

“It is a grueling program and something amazing to be a part of,” Corina Basso (senior, Kinesiology) said. “Going to Nationals was an amazing opportunity… The moment we stepped on the mat, it was the feeling of ‘wow, we really made it’ and that feeling is something I will remember forever.”

Interest amongst the students is what keeps this squad going.  Coach DeGuzman encourages students interested to try-out for next year’s cheer team.

“There are so many cheerleaders in this area that now go to Stanislaus,” DeGuzman said. “Maybe some of them have a competition background, or even if it’s not what they’re used to, they have this opportunity to come try out and compete.”

The tryout clinic is set for April 17, and the actual tryout itself will be held Saturday, April 18. For more information, visit warriorathletics.com.







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            [post_content] => 

The CSU Stanislaus track and field team had a slight turn of bad luck after a great day at Sacramento State University's Hornet Stadium.

During the successful day, two of the Warriors picked up provisionals. In the pole vault was freshman, Chance Hagar and the 800 meter run was sophomore, Abraham Alvarado.

Hagar cleared one foot over his own season best to take the NCAA Provisional mark in clearing 15 feet 9 inches. That steered him into 8th place in all of Division II pole vaulting. As he was gaining speed to take 16 feet, 2 3/4 inches, Gravity took hold of Hagar slamming him down between the mat and the standard. In doing so, Hagar twisted his ankle and broke the strongest bone in the human body, the femur. He immediately was taken to the UC Davis Medical Center where he was taken into surgery. If Hagar would have cleared the bar he would have been in a great position to attend the NCAA Division II Outdoor Track and Field Championship held in May. Overall, Hagar finished 5th on Saturday.

Alvarado marked a provisional in the 800 meter run with a time of 1:51.14 and finished second. His teammate, Ian Brooks came in ninth place and was unable to make provisionals. Aman Hundal placed sixth in the women's race and missed provisionals by a few hundredths of a second with the time of 2:13.80.

Gary Randolph is at it again setting his provisional to 171 feet, 2 inches in the discus. Even though he came in fifth place, he was competing against Division I throwers. For the women, Krystal Alnas was fifth best on Saturday, reaching 169 feet 6 inches in the hammer throw.

Follow the Warriors as they compete in the San Francisco State Distance Carnival and the Stanford Invitational on April 4.

[post_title] => Warrior track and field, provisional marks set at Sacramento State [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => warrior-track-and-field-provisional-marks-set-at-sacramento-state [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-23 11:41:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-23 18:41:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=4588 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4548 [post_author] => 88 [post_date] => 2015-03-22 10:56:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-22 17:56:19 [post_content] => Saturday’s baseball doubleheader consisted of the Warriors (7-18) snapping an eight-game losing streak, followed by a combined number of 33 total hits and six hours of game time. The first game was led by Nick Voumard, who pitched 6 1-3 innings and only gave up one earned run on four total hits. The Warrior offense picked up two runs with combined efforts from Marcus Mastrobuoni batting 2 for 4 with an RBI, Scott Stetson batting 1 for 3 with a run scored and Nick Molina batting 2 for 3 with a run scored. For game one, 2 runs on 7 hits gave Aaron Godinez the opportunity for the Warriors first save of the year and he took it. Godinez pitched 2 2-3 innings without giving up a single earned run on three total hits. The second game was not as smooth for the Warriors. An injury prone rotation has taken Chris Sauls out of the bullpen and put him in the starting rotation. Sauls only lasted two innings on the mound after giving up four runs on five hits. He was replaced early by Martin Gomez and that was just the start of the relief for the Warriors. Six different Warrior pitchers combined to complete a nine inning game. The previously sleeping offense for Sonoma State (16-13) came to life quickly as they picked up 15 runs off of 21 hits. The first 14 of those runs came within the first five innings. On the other hand, the Warriors offense answered early with two runs in the second inning, but they were silenced after that. The Warriors would not score for six straight innings despite picking up 12 total hits. The offense did, however, come back to life in the ninth inning with a three-run home run by Erik Colombini, but it was too late for the Warriors. Sonoma State took the second game with a devastating score of 15-5. Saturday’s victory in game one was the first Warrior victory since Feb. 27 against Dominguez Hills, but it was the first win at home since Feb. 13 against Holy Names University. The Warriors have dropped to the last place in the CCAA with a 2-13 conference record. The Warriors have 26 games left, half of which will be at Warrior Baseball Field. [post_title] => Warriors split doubleheader against Sonoma State [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => warriors-split-doubleheader-against-sonoma-state [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-22 10:56:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-22 17:56:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=4548 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4267 [post_author] => 81 [post_date] => 2015-03-20 13:16:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-20 20:16:15 [post_content] => "Beware the ides of March," a warning message to Caesar from the famous Shakespeare play that oddly enough has relevant meaning today. Not because there is the impending threat of a mutinous overthrow, but because of March Madness. March Madness refers to the widely publicized and wildly unpredictable NCAA Division I men’s college basketball tournament. The top 64 teams from across the nation compete in a winner-take-all tournament divided into four separate brackets based on regions of the country. The four regions are: West, Midwest, East and South. For each of the four regions, 16 teams are selected and ranked within their region based on a combination of their overall team record and their head-to-head matchups against the other teams in their region. Besides all of the excitement that a couple dozen collegiate basketball games will bring to sports fans, the tournament is also well known for the practice of predicting who the winner will be. Ever since the first March Madness tournament that took place back in 1939, fans have been filling out brackets of their own and betting on who they think will take home the coveted title. Fans will take empty brackets with only the first 64 teams filled in and pick and choose who they think will move further up the tournament tree. How people have decided to choose which team will win has become its own field of study, now more commonly known as “bracketology.” While there is no specific date where someone sat down and filled out the first tournament bracket, there is a certain point in the history of the tournament that turned it into the phenomenon it is today. In 1985, the NCAA decided to expand the tournament to include 64 teams, (the way it is today) increasing the field of teams from 48 in previous years. When they made this change, it eliminated the first round of byes for the top seeded teams. More teams in the bracket resulted in greater variation of people’s brackets, and with greater variation came a sharp rise in interest of the tournament. Behind every great idea there is a pioneer who changed the way we think, or in this case, created a household word. The term "bracketology" is a result of who many consider to be the first bracketologist for ESPN, Joe Lunardi. According to a 1996 article in Time Magazine, Lunardi referred to himself as a bracketologist when interviewing with The Philadelphia Inquirer. So, just how exactly did Lunardi make it happen? How was he able to not only create his own word, but also generate the understanding of that word amongst sports fans so that no explanation is necessary? “I used to own a college basketball publishing company called Blue Ribbon,” Lunardi said. “I had the idea, 'What if we added a postseason edition?' Suppose we could get those picks out on Sunday night and get the book out by Thursday. Would people have an interest in that? Do they want more information?” A resounding "yes" to answer your question, Joe. This hunger for more knowledge on the topic of college basketball has been the center of discussion for office cubicles nationwide for the past few decades. The rest is history. [post_title] => A brief history of Bracketology, the reason behind the madness [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => brief-history-bracketology [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-16 13:23:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-16 20:23:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=4267 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )
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            [post_content] => With the determination of the Library of the Future (LotF) Steering Committee, big plans are finally set in motion for California State University, Stanislaus’ campus library.

The LotF task force is holding an open forum on March 19 at noon in the South Dining Hall on campus.

Ron Rodriguez, Dean of Library Services, encourages all students to attend and voice their opinions about how the library should improve.

“What can be done better?” Rodriguez said. “What can we do in terms of what the students want?”

The committee wants to focus on re-imagining the library’s entire experience, as well as the shape of the layout of what goes where.

Rodriguez said he wants the library to be more than just a place for students to walk in, get things done and leave.
  
He (and the rest of the LotF unit) wants to provide for the future a place that people will genuinely enjoy.

To help give feedback on the library, students have taken surveys around campus and online over the past few months.

“I heard that they are going to put a cafe in the library that serves probably just coffee and sandwiches,” Danibel Pourbabaei (senior, Communication Studies) said. “There might be a Starbucks but I’m not sure.”

When addressed about this rumor, Rodriguez could not help but chortle a little bit because while the idea remains true, the specifics are premature.

“I’m sure the students would like a mini-Starbucks in the library tomorrow,” Rodriguez said and then chuckled. “We’re just not there yet.”

The construction details for the university’s library have yet to be determined; however, Rodriguez has already been envisioning.

“The ideal scenario would be to have funding similar to the Science Building, where the outside stays the same and the inside is completely redone.”

Make sure to attend the open forum in order to be involved in the process.
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            [post_content] => 

Imagine a cold, delicious scoop of vanilla ice cream sandwiched between two warm, cinnamon and sugar coated donuts, drizzled with a thick maple syrup.

Is your mouth watering yet? This is not a dream. It is called an ice cream donut sandwich, and yes, it is a real thing.

The miraculous creation is just one of the many fair foods offered at Mariah’s Fair Treats, a mobile food trailer owned and operated by Mariah Vitoria of Hilmar.

Vitoria, 22, has always known that she had a passion for cooking sweets. As a high school student, she spent her summers baking breads, pastries and cookies. Her creative mind experimented with new dessert ideas and soon her dreams of opening up her own restaurant blossomed.

While attending California State University, Stanislaus as a Business major, Vitoria realized that she was ready to start making treats professionally. She took time away from school to focus on her business.

After getting the thumbs up from her mom, she purchased a mini donut maker off Craigslist and got cooking.

“I thought, ‘I’m just gonna buy this, see what happens. I’m just gonna go for it,’” Vitoria said.

Originally called “Soooo Yummy Mini Donuts”, Vitoria started out selling her donuts underneath a little red tent.

She traveled to local farmers markets, festivals and events offering delectable mini donuts by the bucket. She soon realized that she would need to expand if she wanted her hobby to turn into a successful business.

Rather than take out a loan, Vitoria was able to fully fund her business through her self-proclaimed profession of “sweepstaker.”

Through online sweepstakes and contests, Vitoria has won $400,000 to $500,000 in various trips and prizes over the years, including five cars. She was even featured on the reality television show “Sweepstakers” in 2013.

“That’s how I was able to buy my trailer and start my business with, luckily, zero debt,” Vitoria said.

Today, that trailer is known as Mariah’s Fair Treats and offers food 365 days a year - traveling to private parties, corporate events, county fairs, festivals and farmers markets.

The menu includes staple fair food items such as corn dogs, French fries and funnel cakes.

Vitoria offers an array of deep fried snacks (including Oreos, Twinkies and Snickers), but also enjoys creating treats that set her truck apart from others at events.

Her ice cream donut sandwich was such a hit that Food Network’s show “Carnival Eats” featured it on an episode.

Of all the food vendors at the fair, Vitoria and two others were chosen to be filmed for the television show when Food Network came to the 2014 Stanislaus County Fair.

Hoping to recreate the success of the tasty ice cream treat, Vitoria went back to the drawing board and came up with another invention which is sure to take fair food where no one has gone before.

“Another thing I created is the funnel cake bacon cheeseburger,” Vitoria said. “People are hesitant to try it, but once they do they really like it.”

The funnel cake bacon cheeseburger is exactly what it sounds like: a bacon cheeseburger with funnel cakes instead of buns. To add to the explosion of flavor, Vitoria also drizzles maple syrup over the top of the burger.

She hopes that this new menu item can be as successful as the ice cream donut sandwich has been and plans to advertise it heavily on both Facebook and Instagram before the upcoming fair season.

At the 2015 Stanislaus County Fair, the Mariah’s Fair Treats trailer will also be accompanied by two Dippin’ Dots stands, courtesy of Vitoria’s business partner, Ron Whiting.

The food truck life is not an easy one. The inside of the trailer can reach extremely high temperatures during the summer months.

Despite the hardships, she makes each and every fair treat she sells with passion and truly enjoys serving fair-goers wherever she travels.

“The most rewarding part is seeing the smile on someone’s face when you hand them a funnel cake,” Vitoria said. “People get so incredibly excited. They’ve been waiting for that funnel cake all year long.”

In the future, Vitoria hopes that Mariah’s Fair Treats can attend even more fairs and establish a consistent, year-round schedule. Based off her success so far, that should not be difficult to accomplish.

If your stomach rumbled while reading this article, do not worry. You can catch Vitoria’s treats at numerous upcoming events: April 11 and 12 at the Manteca Street Fair; May 14 through 17 at the Chowchilla Madera Fair; and May 29 through 31 at the Patterson Apricot Festival. They will also be at all 10 days of the Stanislaus County Fair.

If you would like Mariah’s Fair Treats to cater your party or event, you can email Vitoria at fairtreats@yahoo.com or call  209-623-5622.

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Starting this summer, the Stockton Center of California State University, Stanislaus will offer evening classes for the Multiple Subject Credential Program (MSCP).

The center has not been able to offer these classes for the past five years.

CSU Stanislaus students persuing a career in teaching can now take classes at either the Turlock campus or Stockton Center – or both.

“I am really happy because I commute everyday to Turlock,” said Natalie Ungson (junior, Liberal Studies).

In an effort to increase the Stockton Center production level, CSU Stanislaus reached an agreement with Aspire Langston Hughes Academy in Stockton to allow the student teachers the opportunityto put their knowledge into practice.

The fields that have the most openings are Science and Math, though the Special Education sector is another area in need of teachers.

“There are a lot of jobs,” Elmano Costa, Professor of Teacher Education, said. “Better grapes make better wine. I believe we have really good students.”

The CSU Stanislaus Stockton Center is located at 612 E. Magnolia Street in Stockton.

For more information regarding the MSCP, email Dr. Anne Weisenberg, Multiple Subject Coordinator, at aweisenberg@csustan.edu or call 209-667-3474.

You can also stop by the Credential Services Office in Demergasso Bava Hall 303 on the Turlock campus.

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Two road improvements have been set in motion, expecting to improve the area on Geer Road between Monte Vista Avenue and Taylor Road as well as on Hawkeye Avenue between Dels Lane and Olive Avenue.

These projects are partially due to a $105,550 grant received on behalf of the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, CalRecycle.

It is expected that the grant money will alleviate a portion of the expenses needed to ensure the safety of sidewalks in the Hawkeye Avenue area.

In addition to the road projects taking place on Geer and Monte Vista, there are already visible improvements underway at the intersection of Christofferson Parkway and Fosberg Road in the form of new stoplights.

Although the new stoplights have already been installed, it is unclear as to when they will be fully functioning.

Turlock resident Elyzabeth Baron has mixed feelings about these road improvements. 

“I believe that not every area in Turlock gets the privilege to be able to benefit from these projects,” Baron said. “You don’t see lower income parts of town getting funded for their roads to be fixed.”

According to the CalRecycle website, the Rubberized Pavement Grant Program allows used tires to be put to use once more rather than being retired in a manner that could be potentially harmful to the environment.

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            [post_content] => A 4 a.m. wakeup call sounds like the least appealing thing to anyone- unless you are farmer Mike Staack, who often sees the sunrise during harvest season.

Staack is an almond farmer out of Denair, Calif., who lives his everyday life doing something he never thought he would.

[caption width="300" id="attachment_4625" align="alignnone"]Mike Staack/Grizzly Nut  Mike Staack/Grizzly Nut[/caption]

Staack moved from Iowa to California after being in the Air Force. His original plan was to be an air traffic controller, but that all changed after he met his wife-to-be in 1986.

“I ended up going to work for [my wife’s dad]. I didn’t know anything about almonds…,” Staack said. “So I ended up going to work for him and I worked for him for 18 years and helped build his business. I was a student of the industry, of the almond industry, and bought some land myself with my wife.”

Now, Staack’s life revolves around his almond business. It involves early mornings and lots of hours. As the owner, his responsibilities extend far beyond simply monitoring what his crews are doing.

[caption width="300" id="attachment_4623" align="alignnone"]Mike Staack/Grizzly Nut   Mike Staack/Grizzly Nut[/caption]

“Most of the crews usually work 10 hour days, six days a week,” Staack said. “Me, as an owner, I work more than that. So we may have repairs to take care of and other things that force us into more hours…”

“Additionally we have a processing plant too, it’s Grizzly Nut,” Staack said. “So that starts earlier in the morning with marketing overseas with brokers. Sometimes I’m up at four o’clock in the morning talking to different countries, people who we’re selling to and marketing to…”

[caption width="300" id="attachment_4624" align="alignnone"]  Outside view of the Grizzly Nut plant. Mike Staack/Grizzly Nut[/caption]

Staack not only has Grizzly Nut, but he also sends his harvested almonds to the company "Madi K" based out of Los Angeles, Calif. The company sells chocolate covered almond clusters, in milk or dark chocolate, with caramel, among others.

“We raise the almonds, we harvest them, we process them and then we ship them to L.A.,” Staack said. “And then he [his partner in the nut business] takes them, roasts them and then he sells them all over the world. They’re even on airlines.”

For more information, you can visit Madi K’s website at madiks.com. You can also like Grizzly Nut’s Facebook page.

“A lot of people think that we go on vacation… we go when the time’s right to go. We put a lot of hours in.”
            [post_title] => Local almond farmer, Mike Staack shares his story
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            [post_content] => The Biology Student Association held a meeting on March 17 in the Science building at California State University, Stanislaus.

Dr. Michael Fleming was a guest speaker this week from the CSU Stanislaus department of Biological Sciences. He gave a presentation on his research he conducted from 2002 to 2005 on plants, specifically "Spartina."

Dr. Fleming taught at a high school in Oregon, and started his research on Spartina in Portland.  He began his Ph.D program there as well, where he worked on a live volcano.

“Spartina falls under a 'dangerous species' category,” Dr. Fleming said. "Invasive species pose threats to native ecosystems and costs billions of dollars each year. In the USA alone, damage is $38 billion. Additional cost produce loss in agriculture and forestry and reduced recreation and tourism.”

Dr. Fleming then showed biology students what a healthy marsh looks like compared to an unhealthy marsh. A healthy salt marsh has gentle slopes, navy peds, many plant species, healthy shellfish and populations.

He also had a study site where he and associates sprayed the plant species to see if it was effective. He showed students a time period of spraying results and had a control group. Dr. Fleming concluded after July that the treatment is not effective.

Today, Spartina is still a problem- especially to coastal regions like Washington, Oregon and California. California has many outbreaks of Spartina in the Bay Area.
            [post_title] => Spartina Attacks, Bio Student Association Meeting
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            [post_date] => 2015-03-24 19:41:39
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            [post_content] => Many expected clouds, even rain, during the National Agriculture Day event held at the west steps of the Sacramento Capitol Building, but instead, the sun shone brightly.

Hundreds of participants, both farmers and non-farmers spent time tasting samples of farm produce and meats, as well as learning about what farmers do to contribute to California’s agricultural success.

[caption id="attachment_4651" align="alignnone" width="300"]Tents and booths were set up at the west steps of the Capitol Building in Sacramento to celebrate National Ag Day. Anthony Johnson/The Signal Tents and booths were set up at the west steps of the Capitol Building in Sacramento to celebrate National Ag Day.
Anthony Johnson/The Signal[/caption] The event took place on March 28 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  Booths were set up from various groups and organizations, ranging from students of the UC Davis soil graduate group who demonstrated the filtering capacity of certain soils to the United States Customs and Border Patrol who showed off their Agriculture Products Detection dogs. [caption id="attachment_4655" align="alignnone" width="200"]Floyd, a Customs and Border Protection Detector Dog demonstrates his ability to sniff out agricultural items and alerts his handler, Tiffany M. Bennett, by sitting. Anthony Johnson/The Signal Floyd, a Customs and Border Protection Detector Dog demonstrates his ability to sniff out agricultural items and alerts his handler, Tiffany M. Bennett, by sitting.
Anthony Johnson/The Signal[/caption] Within an hour of the event starting, various prominent members of California’s farming community, including California Department of Food and Agriculture Secretary, Karen Ross, spoke to the crowd of participants. Ross spoke on the importance of focus on California’s produce and maintaining healthy, fertile soil for generations to come. [caption id="attachment_4654" align="alignnone" width="300"]California Department of Food and Agriculture Secretary Karen Ross welcomes visitors to the festivities, also taking time to talk about a few statistics of the farming community and their produce. Anthony Johnson/The Signal California Department of Food and Agriculture Secretary Karen Ross welcomes visitors to the festivities, also taking time to talk about a few statistics of the farming community and their produce.
Anthony Johnson/The Signal[/caption] Nearly every booth was established to provide learning experiences to those who wished to learn more about the "Agri-culture" of California. Others offered free samples of foods ranging from large strawberries to samples of cooked beef. “This [Ag Day] is very important,” Amanda Crumpacker, an Ag Day attendee, said. “I feel like people in the city don’t have an opportunity to know where their food comes from. With something like this, they can come out and explore and get to know a little bit more of the food process.” [caption id="attachment_4653" align="alignnone" width="200"]Kayla Burns of UC Davis' soil graduate group demonstrates the filtering capacity of loam soil, compost soil and sand at a booth during National Ag Day. Anthony Johnson/The Signal Kayla Burns of UC Davis' soil graduate group demonstrates the filtering capacity of loam soil, compost soil and sand at a booth during National Ag Day.
Anthony Johnson/The Signal[/caption] “Adults will be informed about issues so that they can pass that information on to their children who need to know where food comes from,” Hugh Ashley, a prospective farmer and Ag Day attendee, said. “That’s really important. A lot of kids don’t understand that.” [caption id="attachment_4652" align="alignnone" width="300"][From left to right] Ruby Raindrop, Sammy Soil and S. K. Worm posed for photographs as mascots of the farming community. Anthony Johnson/The Signal [From left to right] Ruby Raindrop, Sammy Soil and S. K. Worm posed for photographs as mascots of the farming community.
Anthony Johnson/The Signal[/caption]For more information on when and where the next National Agriculture Day will be, check out agday.org. [post_title] => Ag Enthusiasts gather at State Capitol for Ag Day [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ag-enthusiasts-gather-state-capitol-ag-day [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-24 19:41:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-25 02:41:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=4497 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4545 [post_author] => 95 [post_date] => 2015-03-22 08:59:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-22 15:59:36 [post_content] => Science Saturday was held March 21 by Dr. Mark Grobner and students in the Naraghi Hall of Science at California State University, Stanislaus. Science Saturday introduced sea urchins to kids in fifth and sixth grade. The students were able to learn how to fertilize a sea urchin. [caption id="attachment_4645" align="alignnone" width="300"]Brittney Battiste/The Signal Brittney Battiste/The Signal[/caption] Sea urchins are important to the ecosystems, but many predators hunt and feed on these sea creatures.  Humans have a huge impact on sea urchins as well because of what they dump into the ocean that can be harmful to them. There were CSU Stanislaus student helpers to assist the children in the sea urchin fertilization lab. They assisted by injecting the sea urchins with potassium chloride- which caused the sea urchin to release sperm if it was a male and eggs if it was a female. Next, the students took the sperm and put it through a process called serial dilution. After that, they diluted the amount of sperm and combined it with the eggs on a microscope slide to induce fertilization and show the kids the visual process of the cells dividing to make sea urchin babies. [caption id="attachment_4644" align="alignnone" width="300"]Brittney Battiste/The Signal Brittney Battiste/The Signal[/caption] The students were also able to see if the sea urchin would produce the same amount of sperm eggs with the jelly coat around it. The jelly coat is invisible around the egg but it is still present and able to be seen through a microscope. Lastly, the chemical A23187 was added which then induced the sperm. Science Saturday is a great way for young students to learn about science in a hands on way.   [post_title] => Science Saturday: Sea Urchin Fertilization Lab [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => science-saturday-sea-urchin-fertilization-lab [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-24 19:44:30 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-25 02:44:30 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=4545 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )