Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5569
            [post_author] => 104
            [post_date] => 2015-05-11 11:17:27
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-11 18:17:27
            [post_content] => A magnifying earthquake hit Nepal, and other neighboring countries on April 25. The death toll has reached over 7,300 according to the New York Times and continues to rise as rubble is removed from areas.

Kathmandu Valley, Nepal was one of the towns hit the hardest. Many of the towns in Nepal are rural and full of poverty, causing even greater devastation with the recent quake.

The earthquake has destroyed many facilities that would aid those people who are in need. This natural disaster has called many countries to come and offer any aid they can.

The SF Gate stated that the United States (U.S) troops would be sent to help deliver supplies and aid to the people of Nepal. Much of the help has been slow because of the inaccessibility in Nepal. Knowing that thousands of families will be homeless, with no food or water, they are in a hurry to come to their aid.

According to the Associated Press, “foreign aid is expected to play a big role in rebuilding the impoverished nation after the quake.” 

If one went on their Facebook page when the earthquake happened many saw a post that said to donate to Nepal Earthquake Relief. Facebook provided information to donate to International Medical Corps that will help with restoring healthcare and supporting the people of Nepal.

The USAID has a site that has more information on where to donate to the Nepal Earthquake Relief. They do not accept any monetary donation and only provide information to organizations that are responding to Nepal. If you wish to donate and to help millions of people in the Nepal region go to usaid.gov. to find a notable organization that you woul like to donate to.

http://www.usaid.gov/nepal-earthquake

 
            [post_title] => Foreign aid to play a big part in Nepal relief
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => foreign-aid-play-big-part-nepal-relief
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2015-05-11 11:17:27
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-11 18:17:27
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5569
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [1] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5459
            [post_author] => 82
            [post_date] => 2015-05-06 09:30:10
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-06 16:30:10
            [post_content] => Hunger and homelessness is a reality for California State University students, and the CSU system is attempting to do something about it. The one-year project will look into the scope of food and housing issues and make recommendations on how to help students in need.

There are 460,000 students on 23 campuses and there isn't a clear indication of the number of students lacking basic needs. It is believed the number of students without permanent housing is above what is reported.

"Students who experience homelessness are not required to identify themselves, and because of the stigma associated with homelessness, they purposefully hide their circumstances from those who might be able to help them," said Rashida Crutchfield, a CSU Long Beach social work professor who will conduct the study. "There is a need for systems to be put in place at universities across the nation to find these students."

Students with food and housing difficulties find it more difficult to focus on academic work said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White in a statement.

"Students should be focused on their education – but this focus is hard to maintain for those who do not know where they will sleep or when they will eat their next meal," he said.

A number of campuses provide services to students in need such as donor-funded food pantries, clothing and hygiene products.

The long beach campus has taken action with an intervention program that includes donated meals, short-term housing and emergency funds.

Officials say that the Fresno's Food Security Project, which launched in November, includes a student cupboard that had more than 900 visitors in the first 51 days.
            [post_title] => One-year CSU project could soon give relief to students in need
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => csu-students-need-soon-find-relief
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2015-05-06 09:07:34
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-06 16:07:34
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5459
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [2] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5574
            [post_author] => 102
            [post_date] => 2015-05-06 09:02:17
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-06 16:02:17
            [post_content] => California State University, Stanislaus will hold its annual Warrior Day celebration this Friday, May 8. Although it may be hard to contain the excitement, it is important to remember that there are some important guidelines that all individuals attending the experience must take into consideration.

Students may not show up intoxicated. Those who do, will not be allowed to enter and participate in the event.

“Anyone who is obviously intoxicated will be stopped, detained and not allowed into the event," said Andy Roy, University Police Department (UPD) Police Chief. "If they are unable to care for themselves or others because they are drunk, they will be arrested and transported to jail. Warrior Day is a day of celebration. It is not a day for anyone to violate state laws or rules of the University.”

Another important aspect of this year's regulations is those who do arrive at Warrior Day intoxicated and become detained, will not be released to friends.

“A notable difference from previous Warrior Days is that we will not be releasing seriously impaired people to friends,” said Roy. “There is too much that can go wrong. They can later be assaulted, drive a vehicle and cause an accident, or even die from alcohol poisoning.”

UPD Police Chief made it clear that it is up to students to decide how enjoyable their Warrior Day experience is.

“It's up to students and guests to decide what kind of Warrior Day they will have," Roy said. "If someone believes this event is geared around getting drunk and partying, they might not have such a great time, especially if they end up going to jail. However, if our students and their guests come to enjoy friends, music and games and to celebrate the end of a great school year, then I believe it will be as good as ever.”

At past Warrior Day events, UPD did have more officers on duty but with the change in alcohol regulations in past years, the number of officers has also changed.

“When alcohol was served at the event prior to 2012, we had many more officers out there than we do today,” said Roy. “Since we no longer serve alcohol, those violations have been reduced dramatically.”

UPD wants all Warrior Day attendees to have a safe celebration. In order for that to happen, students must accept UPD's guidelines.

"Our approach to Warrior Day is the same as it's been in previous years,” Roy said. “The safety of our students, their guests and our community members is our top priority. We look forward for our students to have a good time as the school year draws to a close and commencement approaches. It's a time of celebration.”
            [post_title] => UPD will not tolerate obvious intoxication at Warrior Day to ensure safety
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => upd-will-not-tolerate-obvious-intoxication-warrior-day-insure-safety
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2015-05-17 20:08:18
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-18 03:08:18
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5574
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [3] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5056
            [post_author] => 90
            [post_date] => 2015-04-30 09:45:28
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-30 16:45:28
            [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_5061" align="alignnone" width="300"]Young Manuel as a reporter.  Photo courtesy of Dr. Manuel Murrieta  Young Manuel as a reporter. Photo courtesy of Dr. Manuel Murrieta[/caption]

[caption id="attachment_5062" align="alignnone" width="300"]Dr. Murrieta reading one of his chronicles on Europe from his book "La Grandeza del Azar." Dr. Murrieta reading one of his chronicles on Europe from his book "La Grandeza del Azar."[/caption]

Evident in his early assignments as a reporter, Dr. Manuel Murrieta challenged the boundaries of journalism’s goal to remain objective, and instead created a writing trademark that exuded emotion.

After working for the newspaper for six years in his native country of Mexico, Manuel became the narrator of his personal experiences, a representative in the Latino community, and now a professor of modern languages at California State University, Stanislaus. 

“On an assignment they sent me to report the weather,” Murrieta said, “we live in a desert, so when it rains its a big “fiesta,” a big party.  So i didn’t just report the temperature, the millimeters of rain but the reaction of all the people enjoying the rain.  Since then, I wanted to be an expert on this kind of article.”

Accustomed to seeing anthropologists visit his home town of Hermosillo, he noticed he was being studied, and sought to do the same. 

Murrieta said, “In Latin America we don’t have these big institutions like Harvard etc. to be considered big social observers , but we have our own eyes our own emotions to include our point of view.”

With a curiosity for studying people and an affinity for sharing his experiences, Murrieta found a the balance between deep journalism and the art of literature. 

“I was so desperate not just to be objective, but also wanted to portray my emotions,” he said,  “it was conflicting, because you write objective news, but still there is something inside of you that you want to say.”

This desire to let readers live his experiences sprouted from a realization of his feelings while exploring the world through a lens that would lead him to self-discovery. Young and thirsting for adventure, his group of friends embarked on a road trip across the United States, relieved to be away from the mundaneness of home and creating experiences a young explorer would translate into memories.

“We left high school and we worked to get money to take this trip around the states that lasted two months,” Murrieta said,  “I started feeling emotion. I started to miss my home town my friends and i wanted to communicate to them what we were doing during the trip, and I started writing a journal.”

Upon returning to his home in the state of Sonora, Mexico, Murrieta decided he wanted to become a journalist.  He reached out to the local newspaper, “Información,” presenting the style of writing to which he best felt he belonged, poetry.  Though poems were not considered conventional style journalism, the latino community made room for a bohemian voice.

“I went there to present my poems and they said they didn’t want poets,” Murrieta said, “they wanted writers, and I told them I was interested because if I could write poems I could probably write news. The next day, I was working as a reporter.” 

Murrieta’s experience with print grew, contributing to local newspapers while his educational career was still in it’s infancy.  His choice to be an active writer while studying was what ultimately shaped his major choice in college.

“I got my BA in Spanish American Literature, at my university in Mexico in the state of Sonora, Universidad de Sonora,” Murrieta said, “I studied literature because I was already practicing journalism working with the paper.  So studying literature I thought, and I think I was right, was going to be an opportunity to manage the language-to be more familiar with narrative techniques.”

After completing his undergraduate degree in Mexico, Murrieta participated in an exchanged master’s program with Arizona State.

“I finished my master’s degree and then they offered me another position to continue my Ph.D. and I said, ‘yes!’” 

While working on his dissertations on the analysis of chronicles, Manuel simultaneously instructed courses and reached out to people with which his journeys would resonate.

“I wasn’t this organized student just going to class and teaching, but I started to be in contact with the Latino community,” he said,  “by the end of the Ph.D. I had a proposal to create a cultural section in this local newspaper in Phoenix. It was the first cultural literature section in Spanish in that city.”

Declared Dr. Manuel, Murrieta wasn’t ready to begin his life as a professor, but rather enriched his perspective and generated a library of personal chronicles that characterize his imaginative style. Murrieta’s next few years were centered around traveling around Europe and the United States, building stories for his personal accounts. 

“What happened to me was, I really liked journalism but didn’t want to work directly at the university when I finished. I was waiting for a position where I could teach Mexican literature, or Spanish for native speakers  and with the possibility to teach Spanish journalism or creative language classes.”

Murrieta had written emotive pieces, publishing in Guatemala, Puerto Rico and selecting his favorites to eventually create books. When he decided to begin teaching, he found the opportunity at Stanislaus was particularly perfect. 

“The description of the job was so attractive to me I thought “they are looking for Manuel!,” he said.

Now in his second semester teaching the Spanish journalism course (SPAN 3400) Dr. Murrieta said, “I think we are making history,” and plans to continue documenting his life adventures.

Having published his chronicles on Europe and North America as books titled “La Grandeza del Azar”  and “La Gravedad de la Distancia,”  Murrieta will be jet setting to new territory for his current development on a book about Latin America and in the future hopes to translate his work to English.  Meanwhile, he intends on committing to his role as professor, game-changer and creative enthusiast.   

“I encourage students to be creative, to be emotional, to create their own perspective of life or whatever event they assist,” Murrieta said, “sometimes you need to place your opinion, and if your opinion includes emotion then you are human.”

How to find Dr. Murrieta or his writing:

Phone: 209-664-6825

Email: mmurrieta@csustan.edu

Orbispress: http://www.orbispress.com/colecciones/manuel_murrieta.htmhttp://www.orbispress.com/colecciones/manuel_murrieta.htm

[post_title] => Dr. Manuel Murrieta: Getting to Know the Professor of Modern Languages [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dr-manuel-murrieta-getting-know-professor-modern-languages [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-04-30 09:37:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-30 16:37:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5056 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )
Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5553
            [post_author] => 89
            [post_date] => 2015-05-06 17:56:35
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-07 00:56:35
            [post_content] => California State University, Stanislaus is hosting the annual Warrior Day Friday May 8 at the amphitheater from 1-6 p.m. The event is free of charge for Stanislaus warriors. If students are interested in attending with a guest,  individual must present a valid identification card and be at least 18 years of age. Guest tickets must be purchased at the University Student Union Service Desk by May 7 before 6 p.m. 

"We invite students to come out and enjoy the day safely and cautiously," Interim Programs Advisor Lyzz Zaragoza said. 

Entertainment for the event includes Izze & Juicy as DJ, Libertad Norteña featuring Spanish music and Pacific Lung showcasing alternative music. The main act will be performed by E-40. 

"The diversity within the music selection makes it welcoming for anyone to attend and spend time together," Ines Melchor (senior, Sociology) said. 

Other activities for attendees to enjoy include the  Inflatable Beast, the Inflatable Big Baller, a rock wall, an air brush trucker hats station and an oxygen bar. 

Attendees are expected to attend the event entirely sober, and security will be present during the event who will not hesitate to remove or arrest individuals breaking regulations. All campus policies and state laws will be enforced, so "Don't be that idiot." 

Pick up your ticket if you have not yet done so and drop the books for the day as classes are cancelled in honor of Warrior Day. Be ready to get hyphy this Friday. 

"E-40 is coming, so it's going to be live," Elijah Carter (senior, Business) said. 

 
            [post_title] => Warrior Day 2015 to feature E-40
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => warrior-day-2015
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2015-05-06 17:59:15
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-07 00:59:15
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5553
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [1] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5551
            [post_author] => 92
            [post_date] => 2015-05-05 08:19:09
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-05 15:19:09
            [post_content] => Hundreds of emails, hours of meetings and 103 days later the first KCSS Compilation album will be available for purchase on May 9, 2015.

Featuring 35 songs from 35 different local musicians, buying the compilation album is the best seven dollars you will spend this year.

A great amount of time, planning and hard work went into this project and bringing it to life was a great experience for the whole KCSS student team.

In review, KCSS accepted song submissions from local musicians for the first two months of the spring semester accompanied with a compilation album art contest. The cover art featured on the album and disc was created by California State University, Stanislaus Art student Roberto Gudino and the inside panel features artwork from all art contest participants.

This idea to create a compilation album at KCSS was easy to think of but a process to implement. Budgets, approvals and negotiations were necessary to make this project happen. Working with an online CD pressing company, Oasis, KCSS was able to push this project to the level that they wanted.

Production Director, Garrett Smart, spent countless hours organizing the track list, laying out the format of the artwork and text on the album, as well as mastering the album. But his dedication was following a goal.

"I really want to create a thriving network of musicians that can hold together the central valley's music scene," Smart said.

The KCSS Compilation Album will be available for purchase for the first time at the annual KCSS Bandstand concert at The Grizzly Rock Cafe, May 9 at 5 p.m.

For more information contact kcsspromos@gmail.com.
            [post_title] => The KCSS Compilation Album Is Here
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => kcss-compilation-album
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2015-05-05 08:19:09
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-05 15:19:09
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5551
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [2] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5447
            [post_author] => 97
            [post_date] => 2015-04-30 14:30:49
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-30 21:30:49
            [post_content] => On Saturday May 2, 2015 the California State University Stanislaus Student Nurses’ Association will hold their second annual 5K walk and a health fair from 8:30 am-12 pm. “It is important for us to improve the health of the community,” said Cassandra Landrum Vice President of CSUS Student Nurses’ Association, (senior, Nursing). The walk will take around campus and it is a free event. “The 5K is to raise money for the American Heart Association,” said Landrum. The walk starts at 10 am, pre-registration is $25 and $30 on the day of the event. They will provide free water bottles to the first 100 participants.

This event is more than just for students, as they will also have the Kinesiology Club and local farmers selling produce. They will have fun activities set up for children to participate in this free event. “We will have local farmers out to attract families to come out,” said Landrum. “The Kinesiology Club will provide free BMI and blood pressures,” said Landrum. “Kinesiology Club will promote healthy lifestyle choices as well.”

“As a student organization, we want the connection made between community, students and the campus,” said Landrum. This is their second year hosting this event whose main goal is to educate the community and students about healthier life style choices. Free parking will be provided on the campus parking lots three and four, off of Crowell Rd.
            [post_title] => Health Fair takes place at CSU Stanislaus quad
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => health-fair-takes-place-at-csu-stanislaus-quad
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2015-04-30 09:38:38
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-30 16:38:38
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5447
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [3] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5360
            [post_author] => 88
            [post_date] => 2015-04-30 14:30:27
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-30 21:30:27
            [post_content] => The Honors department and the Weekend Warrior Program held similar trips to San Francisco this weekend so students could enjoy an educational trip to Alcatraz Island and the Ai Weiwei Art Exhibit installed in the prison.

Alcatraz, once home to notorious prisoners and infamous escape attempts, is now known for its educational audio tour that accompanies the prison-turned-museum. But contemporary Chinese artist Ai Weiwei altered some of the prisons exhibits and opened a few new ones for tourists to see. The exhibit encompassed seven total installations of art.

The tour kicks off with Stay Tuned, which diverts from the regular audio tour along a row of A Block cells. Stay Tuned featured open cells with audio clips of poetry or music created by people like Ai Weiwei, people imprisoned for their art forms. Poems came from the devastation of massacres like the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, speeches came from the injustice of Martin Luther King Jr’s time and songs came from the opposition of Vladimir Putin. The cells in which the audio could be listened to were a symbol of the same cells in which the artists were held or are currently being held in.

[gallery type="rectangular" size="medium" ids="5380,5379,5378"]

Followed by Stay Tuned, Yours Truly was a personal installation that allowed those visiting the art exhibit to choose a postcard, match it to a prisoner of conscience and write them a note. The postcards were collected in two large bins and would be sent to the prisoners for encouragement or support. Several generations of visitors could be seen across the tables writing notes to complete strangers with words of encouragement, some even taking the time to translate their notes into the prisoner’s native language.

[gallery type="rectangular" size="medium" ids="5381,5382,5383,5384,5385,5386"]

The following two installations were a part of the Medical Ward: Blossoms and Illumination. Unfortunately, Illumination was facing technical difficulties playing the audio files of Native American chants, so Blossom was the focus of this portion of the tour.

The Medical Ward, which is not normally open to the public, included more cells and rooms that had sinks, tubs and toilets-- but these porcelain fixtures were filled with white porcelain flowers. The meaning behind this installation was much more subtle and can be interpreted in two different ways: as flowers sent to comfort those in the Medical Ward or as a symbol of China’s Hundred Flowers Campaign. In 1956, the Chinese government supposedly entered a time of tolerance for freedom of expression. A crackdown on those who practiced said tolerance followed, leading to the murder of Ai Weiwei’s father.

[gallery type="rectangular" size="medium" ids="5387,5388"]

"The installation has so many meanings that everyone can take away a unique meaning that speaks to them," Josey Hazelton (senior, Political Science) said. "I liked how the exhibit incorporated standard, human, everyday tools such as sinks, toilets and bathtubs which causes the viewers to think about what they are seeing as well as bring a universalistic meaning to the entire collection."

The final leg of the tour took visitors down the steep hills of Alcatraz to the workhouses that once housed inmates doing monotonous and repetitive labor. The first room featured the installation With Wind which included a large Chinese dragon kite and a few smaller kites in the shape of birds and flowers. While colorful and large, the dragon kite symbolizes personal freedom and includes quotes from other prisoners like Ai Weiwei, including Edward Snowden and Nelson Mandela.

[caption id="attachment_5390" align="alignnone" width="4608"]With Wind utilizes the large Chinese dragon kite to insert political quotes.  With Wind utilizes the large Chinese dragon kite to insert political quotes.[/caption]

Beyond the room full of kites, a workroom was laid out with several panels of LEGOs. The six panels featured the portraits of 176 people who were incarcerated at the time of assembly, some of which have since been released. The portraits were created by thousands of tiny LEGOs and consisted of numerous colors. While faces like Nelson Mandela and Edward Snowden were easy to pick out, other portraits were a sign of the hundreds of people being held captive by their government across the world.

[gallery type="rectangular" size="medium" ids="5391,5393,5392"]

Last, but certainly not least, the neighboring workhouse held Refraction. This installation is only viewable from a tiny hallway that guards used to walk through with guns to keep an eye on the prisoners at work below. In this room, there was a wing made entirely of solar panels that are used in Tibet for energy to cook meals. The large wing was assembled in this room with the intentions of never being used for its purpose: flying. It is symbolic of prison itself.

[caption id="attachment_5395" align="alignnone" width="4608"]The final installation, Refraction, could only be seen from the gun gallery where guards patrolled the area.  The final installation, Refraction, could only be seen from the gun gallery where guards patrolled the area.[/caption]

For those who do not know, Ai Weiwei is a Chinese artist who was arrested in 2011 and held for 81 days without his family’s knowledge. His work openly protests the Chinese government and upon his release his visa was taken and he was barred from leaving China. All of his work was designed in his studio in Beijing and shipped to Alcatraz before being assembled by volunteers with page-by-page instructions.

"This trip provided students with the opportunity to confront the reality that there are prisoners of conscience all around the world," Boden Holland (senior, Communication Studies) said. "While these exhibits are powerful in their own right, I would have to say that Alcatraz serves as a stark reminder of our own nation's relationship with imprisonment."

Ai Weiwei’s work is a moving reminder of the injustices of the world we live in. He not only highlights the corrupt government he lives in but the corrupt attributes of all governments including the United States (as seen in the Snowden reference). While the last chance to see Ai Weiwei’s rendition of Alcatraz was on April 26, I can only hope that his work will come to light again soon for people to honor and remember for years. Until then, those interested in his work can find more of it at aiweiwei.com or connect with Ai Weiwei on Twitter @aiww.
            [post_title] => Honors Department honored to visit Ai Weiwei exhibit at Alcatraz
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => honors-department-honored-to-visit-ai-weiwei-exhibit-at-alcatraz
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2015-05-05 20:53:09
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-06 03:53:09
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5360
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

)
Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5412
            [post_author] => 92
            [post_date] => 2015-04-30 14:00:03
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-30 21:00:03
            [post_content] => It is not our job to put people down.

Not one human being is entitled enough to press their opinions on others when it is not asked or wanted. So who is anyone to call a woman a “slut”?

Sex is a natural thing. It is in place for procreation, to populate the Earth with diverse and unique individuals and better yet it feels wonderful! Yet, women are shamed for enjoying the act of orgasming. An act that releases endorphins consumed by the brain and body, leading to a better, more positive mood, regulation of natural antibodies and better sleep. Multiple articles written on the woman's orgasm have shown countless studies that prove sex and orgasms keep women healthy and help balance those good chemicals like oxytocin.

The social monitoring of each others bodies and sexual activity is out of control in the world today and through the popular use of social media this negativity is spreading faster than ever before. You cannot control what is being said about you, but you can control what you are saying about others.

These harsh judgements are poisoning the population and creating an environment where we are guilty by association.  Having sex does not make you a slut. Having sex with multiple partners does not make you slut.  According to Webster’s dictionary, a slut is a woman that is immoral. Since morals are unique to each person and no one can control others morals, there is no sense in calling a woman a slut.

In an article written by Leora Tanenbaum for The Huffington Post, Tanenbaum states, “In other words, if you are a heterosexual girl or young woman, you are damned if you don't and damned if you do. If you refrain from any expression of sexiness, you may be written off as irrelevant and unfeminine. But if you follow the guidelines, you run the risk of being judged, shamed and policed.”

No matter what shape, size, sexual orientation or nationality, slut shaming is holding women back from expressing themselves. You are free to have sex whenever, wherever with whomever and however you want. Let's switch our focus from shaming to educating. Let's help women have safe and fun sex rather than be ashamed.

We are not entitled to police others. Empower eachother ladies and gentlemen, this isn’t a battle, it’s a journey and we are all in it together.
            [post_title] => Not Your Girls: Be ashamed of slut shaming
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => not-girls-going-bang
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2015-04-30 09:37:53
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-30 16:37:53
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5412
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 3
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [1] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5338
            [post_author] => 85
            [post_date] => 2015-04-30 12:15:51
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-30 19:15:51
            [post_content] => 

As I approach my final weeks in college, I cannot help but look back and appreciate the many opportunities I have been given that will help my transition into whatever life holds next.

I transferred to California State University, Stanislaus in Fall 2013 and will be graduating this semester as a member of the Communication Studies Honors Society.

There were only about eight other Warriors involved with The Signal when I first joined in Fall 2014. Since then the news team has grown to have 19 reporters and 13 staff members.

When I initially registered for the class last semester I was unaware that I was signing up for the university newspaper (at the time I was only concerned with the course's number of units). However, this stroke of serendipity has proven to be one of the most rewarding aspects of my college experience.

The first article of mine that was ever published ended up breaking The Signal’s servers! It even went on to briefly becoming the most-viewed article within The Signal archive... which is awesome.

I went on to publish many more articles throughout the semester (Green Day might have been written about once or twice) and by end, I was promoted.

For Spring 2015 I became the Neighborhood section editor as well as the newspaper’s Distribution Manager.

Online viewership has increased by over 150 percent thanks to Kate Brown's leadership as Editor-in-chief.

This digital transition is huge for The Signal and I am happy that one of my last contributions at CSU Stanislaus is being a part of the implementation process.

I unfortunately did not have the chance to work with Professor Joseph Carranza when he advised the student-run paper; however, I am lucky enough to have been working under the guidance of The Signal’s new advisor, Dr. Shannon Stevens.

The success of The Signal over the last year would not have happened if it was not for her expertise in the field of newspaper reporting.

The staff members are a great group of people that I have enjoyed working next to the past three or four months.

I am sad to leave, but I am also excited to see what is in store for the future.

I am confident The Signal will continue to reflect the voice of the student population on campus and the local residents in the Turlock community better than ever.

Good luck to everyone returning next semester, as well as the incoming writers. I wish you all the best.

[post_title] => 'Good Riddance' to Scott Sikma [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => good-riddance-to-scott-sikma [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-01 00:59:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-01 07:59:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5338 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5417 [post_author] => 88 [post_date] => 2015-04-30 11:45:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-30 18:45:12 [post_content] => Four years ago, I chose Stanislaus. I stepped onto this campus as a wide-eyed, 18-year-old with no clue what the next four years would hold for me. I had no idea that I would give up my lifelong dream of being a math teacher.

I had no idea that I would join the Communication Studies department and absolutely fall in love. If you told 18-year-old me that I would have turned my love for sports into a promising career, I would not have believed you.

My short time at The Signal has been a blessing. A blessing in the sense that it has allowed me to grow in so many ways.

I joined The Signal as a staff writer with little experience in writing, yet it has helped me to develop into a budding sports reporter. I started with sports, but I wrote whatever I could, whenever I could. Also, I assisted with The Signal Live whenever I could, and I have helped the broadcast transition over to media packages as the digital editor.

Over the last two semesters, I have coupled my writing experience with my experience with Warrior Rewind and it has only allowed me to develop my skills as a writer, an editor and a producer.

Four years later, I’m still wide-eyed, only slightly less clueless. The journey I set out on four years ago is quickly coming to an end, but not all endings are sad (unless this is a Nicholas Sparks novel). My experience with The Signal has encouraged me to continue my journey of learning and seek another degree; this time a Master’s.

Recently, Dr. Shannon Stevens mentioned that I wouldn’t even remember The Signal once I started graduate school, but she was wrong. The Signal has been an integral part of my time in as Communication Studies major and I am thankful for that.

My time with The Signal has helped me become the student journalist that I am today, with a soft spot for sports of course. I can only hope that students out there are reading this and realize that there is a place for their passion. I found that place at The Signal.

[post_title] => Sporting farewell for Trisha Garcia [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sporting-farewell-for-trisha-garcia [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-04-30 09:42:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-30 16:42:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5417 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4867 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2015-04-30 11:30:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-30 18:30:01 [post_content] => “I just need to lose like two pounds before I go out and have fun.” “According to this thing I saw on the Facebook, I should only eat like 50 calories and I’ll lose 15 pounds by next month.” Why do we limit ourselves to having fun and living our lives only after we have lost weight? As soon as the first warm day approaches, tabloid magazines, commercials and social media are plagued with articles about the newest and latest way to shed pounds before summer. This teaches young men and women that there is a definite need to lose weight before they should feel comfortable about wearing those new cut-off shorts or those short sleeves, clingy t-shirts. Instead of shedding weight, we must shed the hatred we have for our bodies. Each body is unique, which makes it beautiful. Our so-called “imperfections” are what make us perfect. If we find love and admiration for our bodies like we do for our loved ones, an extra pound there and an extra pound here will not make or break us. Women: You do NOT have to tone your body or lose weight to wear a short summer dress. You do NOT have to starve yourself in order to fit into the standards society has placed. You do NOT have to hide under sweaters and jeans. Your body is perfect the way it is. Men: You do NOT have to cover up your arms because society says they have to be muscular. You do NOT have to drink protein shake after protein shake to look like the digitally-enhanced photos you see in GQ. You do NOT have to sweat and burn up under layers of clothing because you are worried that you don’t fit the “ideal.” There is no ideal, you are perfect just the way you are. Show off the amazing legs that have carried you through this world. Show off the arms that have allowed you to hold loved ones. Show off whatever part of your body you want without the fear that someone is judging the dimple of cellulite, the extra fluff or the scar you got in second grade. Those superficial things do not matter. The love for yourself is what matters. So as it gets hotter outside, we hope to see all of you women and men showing off your spring and summer clothes will no fears and no hate. If you have any questions or topics that you would like to see discussed, please email notyourgirlss@gmail.com.   [post_title] => Not Your Girls: Do not shed pounds, shed hate [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => not-girls-not-shed-pounds-shed-hate [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-04-30 09:35:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-30 16:35:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=4867 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )
Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5497
            [post_author] => 91
            [post_date] => 2015-05-03 22:15:33
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-04 05:15:33
            [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_5498" align="alignnone" width="300"]The A's celebrate after the final out of Dallas Braden's perfect game   Andrew Kirk/ Signal The A's celebrate after the final out of Dallas Braden's perfect game. (Andrew Kirk/ Signal)[/caption]

On May 9, 2010 at the O.Co Coliseum, Stockton's own Dallas Braden threw the 19th perfect game in MLB history against the Tampa Bay Rays with a final score of 4-0.

Braden was on a roll early as he was able to get a lot of help from his defense with great plays by Daric Barton and Kevin Kouzmanoff . He managed to strike out six and threw 109 pitches in the game.

In the ninth inning, everyone in the Coliseum was on their feet. The fans knew that Braden was going to make history and were standing behind him the whole time.

He managed to get the Ray's leadoff hitter to line out to first base.

The second hitter hit a line drive to left field.

Finally, it was all up to Ray's hitter Gabe Kapler. He drew Braden to a 3-1 count on the and then drove the ball to A's shortstop Cliff Pennington. Pennington threw it to first and Barton caught the ball to give Braden the 19th perfect game in Major League Baseball history.

To get a perfect game, a starting pitcher must record every out of every inning without giving up a hit, walk or error. It is something that has only happened 23 times in MLB history and has not happened since 2012 when Felix Hernandez of the Seattle Mariners did it against the Rays.

 
            [post_title] => Throwback: Dallas Braden perfect game
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => throwback-dallas-braden-perfect-game
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2015-05-03 22:15:33
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-04 05:15:33
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5497
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [1] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5514
            [post_author] => 88
            [post_date] => 2015-05-03 17:27:39
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-04 00:27:39
            [post_content] => Saturday's doubleheader kicked off with a senior ceremony that highlighted Dante Broome, Donnie Fairchilds, Skippy Ferreria, Aaron Godinez, Martin Gomez, James Heller, Marcus Mastrobuoni and Stevie Robinson.

In alphabetical order, Warrior Athletics and the baseball team honored Broome first. In his short one year career at Stanislaus, the transfer from Northeastern State batted 9-for-46 over 27 games played (14 started). His batting highlights include one double and 2 RBI.

 

[caption id="attachment_5522" align="alignnone" width="300"]#5 Dante Broome accompanied by his parents and sister on senior day.  #5 Dante Broome accompanied by his parents and sister on senior day. Photo courtesy of Warrior Athletics.[/caption]

Pitcher Donnie Fairchilds followed next, accompanied by his parents and his younger brother. With 27.2 innings pitched, Fairchilds holds the team's second lowest ERA at 3.25 in his senior year. Fairchilds has pitched for the last two seasons for the team, including starting six games, but pitching in 25 total games.

[caption id="attachment_5523" align="alignnone" width="300"]#33 Donnie Fairchilds accompanied by his parents, grandfather and little brother.  #33 Donnie Fairchilds accompanied by his parents, grandfather and little brother. Photo courtesy of Warrior Athletics.[/caption]

Five-year senior Skippy Ferreria was also honored on Saturday. Ferreria has been an outfielder for the Warriors his entire collegiate career. He played in 154 games (134 of which he started) and he holds a .307 batting average over his career. Ferreria has batted 158-for-515 including 27 doubles, two triples, two homeruns and 45 RBI. He came in second last year for the conference batting title behind teammate Marcus Mastrobuoni and he is often competing for the record for stolen bases, having 36 in his career. Ferreria is now sixth all time for stolen bases for the Warriors (second place with 17 in conference this season) and fourth all time for number of at-bats in a career.

[caption id="attachment_5524" align="alignnone" width="300"]#13 Skippy Ferreria accompanied by his parents and his brother.  #13 Skippy Ferreria accompanied by his parents and his brother. Photo courtesy of Warrior Athletics.[/caption]

Pitcher Aaron Godinez followed Ferreria, accompanied by his parents, his brother and his girlfriend. Godinez has been part of the Warrior bullpen for two years. He has pitched 68 total innings, earning five wins and four saves. For his senior year, he currently has the lowest ERA on the team.

[caption id="attachment_5525" align="alignnone" width="300"]#24 Aaron Godinez accompanied by his parents, brother and girlfriend. #24 Aaron Godinez accompanied by his parents, brother and girlfriend. Photo courtesy of Warrior Athletics.[/caption]

Godinez was followed by another bullpen pitcher, Martin Gomez. Gomez, accompanied by his mother, has pitched for Stanislaus for two years moving from the starting rotation to the bullpen and pitching 33.1 innings in his career. With an ERA over seven, Gomez has earned two wins and one save in his career at Stanislaus.

[caption id="attachment_5526" align="alignnone" width="300"]#14 Martin Gomez accompanied by his mother.  #14 Martin Gomez accompanied by his mother. (Patricia Garcia/Signal)[/caption]

James Heller, an infielder from Turlock, was honored after Gomez. Heller has been part of the Stanislaus team for three years as the first baseman. He has played in 84 games, 64 of which he started. Heller has hit 17 doubles, one triple, two homeruns and 20 RBI this season alone, with an added double and eight RBI coming from previous seasons.

[caption id="attachment_5527" align="alignnone" width="300"]#25 James Heller accompanied by his mother and father.  #25 James Heller accompanied by his mother and father. (Patricia Garcia/The Signal)[/caption]

Marcus Mastrobuoni, accompanied by his parents and his girlfriend, followed Heller. Mastrobuoni, a transfer from Delta College, has been a Warrior for two years. His short career as the Warrior catcher has included winning the CCAA batting title as a Junior, starting 82 of the 84 games he has played and a .369 batting average. Mastrobuoni has been a surge in the Warrior's offense over the last two years as he added 20 doubles, two triples, four homeruns and 58 RBI. With his added at-bats on Saturday, Mastrobuoni has now come up to the plate 301 times in just two years qualifying his .369 batting average for fourth all-time for Stanislaus. Mastrobuoni has also been contacted by several Major League Baseball scouts this season.

[caption id="attachment_5528" align="alignnone" width="300"]#32 Marcus Mastrobuoni accompanied by his mother, father and girlfriend.  #32 Marcus Mastrobuoni accompanied by his mother, father and girlfriend. (Patricia Garcia/The Signal)[/caption]

Last, but not least, senior Stevie Robinson was honored on Saturday. Robinson joined the Warriors from Delta College the same year as Mastrobuoni. As a Warrior infielder, Robinson has started 50 of 63 games he has played in, which has helped him earn a .191 batting average. Robinson's highlight includes having no errors defensively for the Warriors, although the team has 57 errors total. Also, Stevie has a knack for getting free bases, as he's been walked 11 times and hit by pitches 11 times, totaling 22 free bases.

[caption id="attachment_5529" align="alignnone" width="300"]#2 Stevie Robinson accompanied by his mother.  #2 Stevie Robinson accompanied by his mother. (Patricia Garcia/The Signal)[/caption]

Overall, the Warriors said goodbye to eight seniors, leaving Coach Kenny Leonesio a lot of recruiting to do in the off-season. Despite the impressive class of seniors, the Warriors dropped both games on senior day to CSU East Bay and will have one final game in Hayward on Sunday.

 
            [post_title] => Warrior baseball says goodbye to eight seniors
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => warrior-baseball-says-goodbye-to-eight-seniors
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2015-05-03 17:27:39
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-04 00:27:39
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5514
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [2] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5439
            [post_author] => 81
            [post_date] => 2015-04-29 16:08:01
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-29 23:08:01
            [post_content] => 

With less than a month left in the 2015 spring track and field season, one CSU Stanislaus Warrior has already secured a place in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II Championship meet, taking place at the end of May. Abraham Alvarado (sophomore, Kinesiology) posted a blistering time of 1:48.09 in the 800-meters at the Beach Invitational April 18.

That pace was good enough to set not only the school record but also set the bar for the entire meet.“After the 800m I had this bittersweet feeling because I had just missed the 1:47 mark,” said Alvarado. “I was happy with the fact that I had taken the win... it feels good because all the work I put in the off season is paying off.”

Alvarado first began running back in the eighth grade during everyone’s favorite physical education class. Being the fastest kid in his class, his P.E. teacher at the time recognized his talents and recommended he run for the track team and the rest is history.

Alvarado out ran a number of tough opponents in last Saturday’s meet, with many of the athletes representing top Division I universities such as Pepperdine, UC Davis and Marquette.“Within the last 150 meters I saw everyone hit a wall and that’s when I knew I had to go,” said Alvarado.

Alvarado was also awarded California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) Male Track Athlete of the Week honors, his second time this season. His first time winning this award was back in March after posting an impressive time of 1:51.14 in the 800m.

This season’s success perhaps only eclipsed by Alvarado’s previous year running for the red and gold when he was the CCAA 800m Champion. 

Poised to repeat as champion, Alvarado has created a name for himself and has quickly emerged as one of the leaders of the team. “The key to success down the road for me and my teammates is to stay mentally strong and just trust all the training we’ve put in...we are more than ready,” said Alvarado.

[post_title] => Athlete Spotlight [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => athlete-spotlight [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-04-29 16:13:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-29 23:13:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5439 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5287 [post_author] => 91 [post_date] => 2015-04-27 13:42:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-27 20:42:56 [post_content] =>

Being part of a team is more than just what happens on the field.

The team is around each other every day to the point where they spend more time with one another than they do with their own families.

They spend weekends traveling together and basically become a second family.

Here is what each of the four seniors on the CSU Stanislaus softball team had to say during a short question and answer session. 

The interview includes the following participants: Angela Mendoza, outfielder; Jessica Varady, pitcher; Natalie Rendon, pitcher and Holly Mooring, infielder.

Q: What is your most memorable moment while playing softball here at CSU Stanislaus?

Mendoza: Just the experience overall,  just meeting people, learning about not just the game but about [my teammates] also. Having fun while doing something that we love.

Q: What advice do you have for your teammates?

Varady: Don't give up on your dreams. Always work 100 percent. Have no regrets.

Q: What is your favorite memory off the diamond?

Rendon: The river rafting team bonding trip- especially because I've never done it before.  I was actually on a raft with five freshman that year, so being on a raft and kinda getting to know them. Falling in the river was a shock, but that was a memory I'll never forget.

Q:  What was your motivation to play softball until your senior year of college?

Mooring: My motivation to play all the way to my senior year in college is my love for softball. I really do love the sport, and it has probably given me more than I could explain to anybody.

Q: What is something you'd like to say to everyone who has supported you while attending CSU Stanislaus?

Mooring: Thank you for all the great memories. I've only been here for one year, I feel like I've finally found a home as a team I really enjoy being around, and friends who are genuinely my friends.

Varady: Thanks for all the support, and the love. Coming to all the games and   being my number one fans.

Mendoza: This group of girls... we have a bond and a friendship, pick any subject and we can talk about something then laugh about things.

Rendon: Thank you for all the love, support and encouragement. I wouldn't be who I am today without you guys.

Each of these seniors have made an impact on one another and countless hours with each other on and off the field.

Rendon will graduate in December. with a Bachelor of Arts in Child Development, Mooring will graduate next spring with a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology, Varady will graduate in December with a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies and Mendoza will graduate in December with a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology.

[post_title] => Softball seniors: The senior softball players share their favorite memories with CSU Stanislaus softball [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => senior-softball-memories [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-04-29 16:11:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-29 23:11:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5287 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )
Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 4927
            [post_author] => 98
            [post_date] => 2015-04-30 13:00:56
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-30 20:00:56
            [post_content] => Craigslist is an easy, affordable and convenient way to find products, but safety should always be the number one concern while browsing the website.
 
For Turlock residents trying to find jobs, housing, products or services in their area, Craigslist can be a useful tool. However, predators and scammers thrive in the online community, and it is important to keep this in mind when looking to make a purchase or trade.

On March 26 an attempt to sell a pair of tennis shoes ended with a shooting after the would-be buyers tried to pay the sellers with counterfeit cash, according to the Turlock Police Department. 

After realizing they had been paid with fake money, the sellers attempted to recover the shoes and were met with gunfire. Although no one was hit in the shooting, it resulted in a high-speed chase on Highway 99 that ended with the two suspects being taken into custody. What was supposed to be a simple transaction took a turn for the worst, almost costing the sellers their lives.

Here are some safety tips to help ensure a safe and profitable experience when using Craigslist:


  •  Never give out personal contact information. Craigslist gives its users the option to either use their real email address or a Craigslist-provided proxy email address. Using the Craigslist-provided proxy email address is a good idea for those who wish to preserve their anonymity throughout the entire transaction, which can help keep spammers and scammers from getting access to their real email address. Try not to reveal a personal phone number or home address.
  • Always arrange a public rendezvous. Meeting the prospective buyer/seller in a public place is the safest way to avoid an attack of any kind. Sergeant Matt Dillon of the California State University, Stanislaus Police Department suggested the parking lot in front of the Public Safety Building as a safe spot to do business on campus. This area is monitored by surveillance cameras and often nearby is a University Police Officer. “Parking lots, shopping centers; the more people, the better,” Dillon said. “Anywhere busy will be the safest place.”
  • Take a buddy along. It is always a good idea to bring a friend when traveling to a seller’s home to pick up a purchase. Having another person can reduce the risk of being placed into an uncomfortable or dangerous situation. Being alone in a stranger’s home is never a good idea, and having another person provides having a witness to any transaction, which can come in handy if something were to go wrong.
  • Accept or pay only with cash. When accepting a cashier’s check or money order, many fall victim to a common Craigslist scam that involves depositing a fake money order into an account and leaving nothing for the transaction. Also, when paying, make sure to be careful using a personal check. There is a possibility of the seller harvesting the checking account information, which could then be used for fraudulent purposes. Also remember to carefully examine any received cash to make sure that it is not counterfeit.
  • Tell a friend or family member the transaction location. If anything happens, it is important that they know the meeting spot so if need be, they can help more quickly and efficiently. Also remember to always bring a cell phone in order to call for help if the situation becomes dangerous or uncomfortable.
Most Craigslist transactions take place without a hitch, but occasionally they can go terribly wrong. Spoiled Craigslist deals are a common occurrence. Dangerous incidents related to Craigslist not only happen locally, but all over the country every day. According to a 2011 study by the consulting firm AIM Group, Craigslist was linked to 330 U.S. crimes over the course of a year. With the proper safety precautions, Craigslist can be a secure, profitable and even fun way to shop. However, knowing what to do if things become unsafe is important. Keeps these tips in mind when using Craigslist to ensure an enjoyable experience.   [post_title] => Shopping safely: Precautions to use with Craigslist [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => safety-first-protect-craigslist [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-04-30 09:36:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-30 16:36:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=4927 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5309 [post_author] => 99 [post_date] => 2015-04-30 10:30:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-30 17:30:03 [post_content] => Greg Raynes, owner of the newly opened ice cream parlor Oak Barrel Ice and Creamery located at 197 S Golden State Boulevard, ponders the success he has already been experiencing since opening about two weeks away. “I’ve been very surprised...the number of people who have been walking through the door has challenged me to keep the ice cream on the shelves,” Raynes said. Currently a teacher at Dutcher Middle School, Raynes explains that an ice cream parlor has been a long time coming. “Ah, well, throughout my life as a child we spent summers in Carmel Valley with no TV so we had to read and fish. We lived down by the river and my mom would come about once a week with a big ten pound block of ice and an ice pick. My brother and I would break the ice up into chunks and she would make the mix and then we would put it into an old fashioned, hand cranked ice cream freezer, and that was our treat for the summertimes.” As Raynes recounts this quaint tale, there is a fondness in his voice that settles in the air of his beloved shop. Today, his childhood pastime has become a blossoming business that in many ways, allows children and adults alike to revel in the nostalgic disposition of their youth. “People will come in and say as a child, we used to go to this ice cream place and get this ice cream, I never found it anywhere. And I go, ok, let me see if I can make it," Raynes said. "I had a lady come in this last week and was after a pink grapefruit sorbet. She’s going to bring in the pink grapefruits, and I’m going to make the sorbet, and see how it goes.” That is something you would not be able to do at your local chain ice cream shop; Raynes’ authentic investment in his customers is a business trait uncommon these days that will surely set him apart. Perhaps the most important key to his shop’s success can be attributed to the time and care that goes into Raynes’ homemade ice cream which includes flavors such as mint chip, root beer, caramel crunch and strawberry-berry (which includes fresh strawberries). Sorbet is also available for those who prefer dairy-free treats, in flavors such as mango, pineapple cream ice and coffee-caramel cream ice, to name a few. Aside from a regular scoop or two of icea cream ($2 per), milkshakes ($5), sundaes ($5) and quarts ($8) are also available to take home. [caption id="attachment_5622" align="alignnone" width="683"]Chalkboard menu (Andrea Paz/Signal) Chalkboard menu (Andrea Paz/Signal)[/caption] Due to his teaching position, Raynes’ time is currently split between his classroom and his business. “I’ve come to the conclusion that right now at the level I’m at, I need to make ice cream at least 5 hours a day to keep up. If it’s not too busy, I get my counter help here and I will be in the kitchen the whole time making the ice cream,” Raynes said. “I work until noon teaching and then I get over here by 3 and we close up at 9, but these guys (his employees) leave at 7, so my making time right now is 3-7 which is a little bit cramped for me.” Raynes contemplates retiring from teaching in order to focus on his parlor. “The business has picked up a lot and I think it’s probably going to be full time which was the idea anyway, so this may be my last year teaching, we’ll see.” A quick glance around the shop’s small interior shows a tremendous room for progress in the months to come, and Raynes noted that the two back walls belong to his daughter, currently a Zoology major at UC Santa Barbara. When she comes home, she’ll be filling those walls with her art. “That’ll mean a lot to me,” Raynes explained. “What she’s said to me is that she wants me to be happy and follow my dreams...It means a lot to me that she’s proud of me for having the guts to take the jump into it.” Raynes is excited for the future of his business. “I think now I just have to make sure I have a good variety of ice cream and keep the doors open, and I think we’re on our way.” [caption id="attachment_5621" align="alignnone" width="683"]Mango sorbet looks delicious (Andrea Paz/Signal) Mango sorbet looks delicious (Andrea Paz/Signal)[/caption] [post_title] => We all scream for Oak Barrel Ice and Creamery [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oak-barrel-ice-creamery [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-11 14:32:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-11 21:32:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5309 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5276 [post_author] => 98 [post_date] => 2015-04-30 10:00:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-30 17:00:37 [post_content] => Choosing a major, finding a job and picking classes are not the only concerns for a college student. One of the most critical decisions one must make is whether to live on campus in the dorms, or off campus in a house or apartment. While dorm living does allow students to be closer to the campus community, living off campus provides independence and fewer restrictions. In Turlock, there are many off-campus options for those who want to spread their wings and truly experience living on their own. Living in apartments close to the school allows students to stay connected to what is happening on campus, but still keep their freedom. Several apartment complexes surround California State University, Stanislaus. Santos Ayala (senior, Kinesiology) chose to live off campus in Briarwood Apartments, which are located right down the road from CSU Stanislaus at 351 E. Monte Vista Ave. “It’s not as expensive as the dorms and there’s more liberty of what you can do,” Ayala said. “I’m still close to the school and it’s easy to stay connected because events are still advertised around campus.” Briarwood Apartments are popular with CSU Stanislaus students due to their proximity to campus. Amenities include two pools, laundry facilities and patios/balconies. They are pet-friendly and rent ranges from $685 for a studio apartment, $785 for a one bedroom apartment and between $860 and $1010 for various two bedroom floorplans. Another off-campus option for students are the Boardwalk Apartments. Located directly behind CSU Stanislaus at 1000 W. Zeering Road, this complex offers one, two and three bedroom apartments ranging in price from $650 to $1,399. Boardwalk has two swimming pools, laundry facilities and controlled gate access. Pets are allowed with a deposit and furnished apartments are also available. Park Place Apartments are directly across the street from CSU Stanislaus at 3701 Crowell Road, making them a perfect home for Stan State students. Studio, one and two bedroom apartments are offered, starting at $650 and ending at $900. All apartments come equipped with energy efficient appliances, and the complex offers community amenities including a picnic area, swimming pool and high speed internet. While there are countless apartment complexes around campus that are great places to live, some students opt for renting a house. A great way to find houses for rent is to check Craigslist, as it has filters where you can choose the square footage of the house you would like, number of bedrooms, price range and more. Another way to find homes for rent is to check property management sites. These sites often have numerous homes for rent to choose from, and a quick Google search can bring up hundreds of results. A few reliable property management sites in Turlock are Central Valley Property Management (cvpm.com), Sequoia Property Management (sequoiapropertyrentals.com) and New Bridge Management (newbridgemanagement.com). College is an adventure in itself, but living off campus adds a new kind of excitement to the college experience. Whether you choose to live in an apartment or a house, it is the place where a majority of your college memories will be made, so choose wisely. Happy hunting! [post_title] => Affordable independence: Off-campus living [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => affordable-independence-off-campus-living [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-04-30 09:31:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-30 16:31:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5276 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5093 [post_author] => 98 [post_date] => 2015-04-20 19:11:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-21 02:11:58 [post_content] => Turlock City Council announced further water restrictions for the City of Turlock. California's first ever water restriction came on April 1 when Governor Jerry Brown directed the State Water Resource Control Board (SWRCB) to cut water usage by 25 percent across the state, and on April 14, Mayor Gary Soiseth announced that the City of Turlock needs to reduce water usage by 10 percent more as Turlock is one of several communities mandated by the SWRCB to cut their usage by 35 percent. Modesto, Merced and Riverbank are just a few of the 100 towns that share the same reduction rate. The new water conservation laws went into effect on April 14, including significant cuts in water use for landscapes: Residents that live in odd-numbered houses are allowed to water on Wednesdays and Sundays; even numbered houses can water on Tuesdays and Saturdays. Previously, Turlock residents were allowed to water three times per week. Now, watering is also prohibited between the hours of 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. on weekdays. On the weekends, watering is only allowed from 12 a.m. to 12 p.m. Other restrictions include washing down or hosing of sidewalks, gutters and outside structures without permission of the Municipal Services Department. Slip-n-slides are also prohibited, and car washing is restricted to once per week. Water conservation is vital to our community, and many are doing everything they can to help. Turlock resident Carrie Dugovic is using her water as efficiently as possible by saving her cold shower water in a bucket until it gets hot, then using it to water her garden. “It takes four gallons - that’s 1,460 gallons per year, and if everyone in Turlock did this we would save over 100 million gallons per year,” Dugovic said. She has also reduced her watering to 30 minutes once a week. For the City Water Schedule, visit cityofturlock.org. If you have any questions regarding the city’s Water Conservation program or if you observe water wasting, call 668-5590.   [post_title] => New water restrictions for Turlock [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => city-turlock-announces-new-water-restrictions [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-04-20 19:11:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-21 02:11:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5093 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )
Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 5556
            [post_author] => 83
            [post_date] => 2015-05-06 13:06:24
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-06 20:06:24
            [post_content] => As many are aware, farmers in the central valley have been left high and dry thanks to the drought that California is currently experiencing.

The 20 percent increase of allocated water (from zero percent) granted by the California State Water Project has helped some, but farmers still feel a bit parched.  Several local farmers voiced their concerns about what diminishing availability of water could do to not only their crops, but to their business and farms as well.

"I feel [the drought] is potentially one of the greatest threats to California agriculture and that farmers in the drought are highly misrepresented," Darren Jones, a Linden walnut farmer, said. "Last year, farmers fallowed 400,000 acres and are expected to fallow another 400,000 this year."

Fallowing is when farmers leave sections of their farmland intentionally empty to conserve water. The 800,000 acres of fallowed farmland is a cumulative amount spanning across all farms in the central valley.

When asked how farmers are misrepresented, Jones said that it was in the math involved with water being allocated to farmers in need.

"The popular number is 80 percent of water that goes to agriculture and the rest goes to cities and everything. That number is true, 80 percent of the water California captures does go to agriculture," Jones said. "The Federal Water Project is delivering zero percent of promised water for the second year in a row and the State Water Project is only delivering 20 percent of promised water. So, if you do the math on that, that's 90 percent of surface water that's already been cut to farmers."

However, it's not just farmers who deal with exporting crops that are affected. Those who handle livestock are facing their own troubles with the drought.

"Our irrigation district is Modesto Irrigation District and they're cutting back our water to 16 inches. That has really taken effect on how much corn we're able to plant on our land because we're not going to have enough water to require the full seven irrigations for corn to actually make a full crop and go to refining for silage to feed our dairy cattle," Helen Ott, a Modesto Dairy Farmer, said. "Because of our planning last year, we were able to have enough feed to tie us over this year, but if we don't get a crop this year, next year is going to be a really big issue."

Ott also said that the typical amount of water they receive from the Modesto Irrigation District is 36 inches of water.
            [post_title] => Local farmers take on the drought
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => local-farmers-take-drought
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2015-05-06 13:07:24
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-06 20:07:24
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5556
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [1] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 4933
            [post_author] => 95
            [post_date] => 2015-04-30 12:00:48
            [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-30 19:00:48
            [post_content] => Although there has been drought issues throughout the United States of America nothing has been worse than the state of California. The central valley california has a bad drought with little to no water. This c

[caption id="attachment_4934" align="alignright" width="200"]photo credit http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jeff_Denham_Official_Portrait.jpg photo credit
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jeff_Denham_Official_Portrait.jpg[/caption] ould affect California’s agriculture, farmers, and crops. According to denham.house.gov, U.S. Representative Jeff Denham (R-Turlock) issued the following statement regarding Governor Brown’s declaration of a drought in California: “Today's declaration is long overdue. Environmental restrictions and dry weather have exacerbated drought conditions for months now. Thousands of jobs throughout the Valley rely entirely on agriculture and have been negatively impacted by years of unnecessarily scarce water supplies. I continue to urge President Obama and Governor Brown to improve California’s water storage and conveyance by providing additional storage and adding flexibility to burdensome regulations that shut off water to Valley communities.  I have introduced legislation this Congress to do just that. When the situation improves and the watershed increases in the spring, we must put the water to productive use for farmers and families rather than allowing this scarce resource to wash away into the Pacific Ocean.” According to noodls.com, U.S. Representative Jeff Denham (R-Turlock) issued the following statement in reaction to Gov. Jerry Brown's Executive Order imposing water restrictions on the state of California: "In 2009, water agencies throughout California predicted that the new requirements placed on our state's water system would leave us with no water during a prolonged drought. Fishery agencies and environmental groups balked, claiming this day would never come. With the fourth year of drought upon us, these kinds of policies are hurting California farmers, families and the environment, as Governor Brown's announcement today shows. Decades of inaction have finally caught up with California's refusal to build new storage. Conservation alone isn't the answer." Following the release of a study from the University of California, Davis which found that the total statewide economic cost of the 2014 drought is $2.2 billion with a total loss of 17,100 seasonal and part time jobs, U.S. Representative Jeff Denham (R-Turlock) released the following statement: “This study just confirms what I see every day in my district,” said Rep. Denham. “The Central Valley is bearing the brunt of the drought. We must change the regulations coming from Sacramento and Washington bureaucrats that worsen the effects of this devastating drought on our agricultural community. “It’s crucial that we come together with immediate, lasting solutions for increased storage and increased water supplies to see a permanent solution for our Valley farmers signed into law this year.” According to denham.house.gov, “The Economic Analysis of the 2014 Drought for California Agriculture was conducted by the University of California, Davis and funded by the California Department of Food and Agriculture with assistance from California Department of Water Resources. In addition to finding that the drought will cost California more than 17,000 seasonal and part time jobs, the study found that 60 percent of the followed cropland, 70 percent of the statewide crop revenue losses and most of the dairy losses are likely to take place in the San Joaquin Valley.” [post_title] => U.S Congressman makes statement on CA water restrictions [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => u-s-congressman-makes-statement-on-ca-water-restrictions [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-04-30 09:35:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-30 16:35:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=4933 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5374 [post_author] => 95 [post_date] => 2015-04-30 11:30:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-30 18:30:16 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_5375" align="alignnone" width="324"]Flyer Courtesy of Dr. Elvin Aleman Flyer
Courtesy of Dr. Elvin Aleman[/caption] The college of Science is to host their fourth annual poster celebration on Mon. May 11 in the lobby of Naraghi Hall of Science  between 3p.m to 5p.m. This is a great opportunity for students to showcase their work and get the public interested in such work students have been engaging in during the academic year. “We cordially invite the Stanislaus County community, of all ages, to come see the College of Science Student Poster Celebration 2015. This event is our students’ opportunity to show the community their own research and classroom projects”, Dr. Elvin A. Aleman, Chemistry professor said. “Students make posters to summarize their research work and stand by their posters to answer questions. Community members can wander around, asking questions and learning about what different student are doing”. Refreshments will be provided during the event. [post_title] => Fourth Annual Poster Celebration by College of Sciences [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => fourth-annual-poster-celebration-by-college-of-sciences [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-04-30 09:34:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-30 16:34:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5374 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5280 [post_author] => 95 [post_date] => 2015-04-27 15:12:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-27 22:12:51 [post_content] =>

On April 24, Delicato Family Vineyards presented at California State University, Stanislaus in the Chemistry Research Session.

Delicato Family Vineyards is a third generation family wine business that first planted their grapes in 1924.

They are the ninth largest winery in the United States and produce many different types of wines.

Sandra Mercado, who works in their Human Resources department, gave students information about internships available with their company.

Delicato Family Vineyards has worked with previous CSU Stanislaus students and many others throughout California.

Usually, students begin as interns with their company and earn their way to become full-time employees. All interns are paid $14 to $17 an hour, full time.

"There are open positions in Manteca in the lab, in Napa at the Black Stallion Winery and in Monterey for harvest interns,” Mercado said.

Dense Worden is the winemaker for Delicato Family Vineyards and is responsible for guiding the process of the wine. Her job includes going to the vineyards to taste the grapes for flavor and analyzing the grapes for pH (the measure of acidity or basicity) and other testing.

Samples of different wines were passed around for the audience to smell. Students and faculty were not permitted to taste the wines.

CSU Stanislaus alumna Ashley Raker, class of 2012, presented what the role of an enologist is.

She applied for an internship in August and was offered a position in May to became a full-time employee.

She ensures that all of the analysis is correct and helps support winemaking, receives analysis, adjusts the wines, contributes to shipping and monitors the fermentation of the wines.

Kenny Jones, alumnus of California State University, Sacramento, presented information about the lab technicians and intern's responsibilities at Delicato Family Vineyards.

"They support all of the lab functions, test the incoming grapes and assist in the fermentation analysis as well as the solid measurement analysis," Jones said.

Some of the responsibilities also include testing levels of alcohol, sugar, pH and total acids.

Fortunately, Delicato Family Vineyards has not seen an extreme difference in production of grapes during the drought.

However, from 2011 to 2012 there was a plethora of grapes and slightly less has been produced in the following years.

They expect this pattern to continue, however, Delicato Family Vineyards is still overstocked from the blooming of those two years- so they will continue to thrive.

[post_title] => Internship opportunities at Delicato Family Vineyards [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => internship-opportunities-delicato-family-vineyards [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-04-30 08:35:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-30 15:35:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=5280 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )