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            [post_date] => 2014-11-20 13:54:25
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            [post_content] => Students planning on transferring to one of the 10 University of California campuses will face a rise in tuition costs as UC President Janet Napolitano’s plan was approved by the UC governing board on Nov. 20.

According to the Daily Californian, the plan to raise tuition costs over the next five years received a seven to two approval amid UC student protesters shouting “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Napolitano’s got to go” and the opposition of Governor Jerry Brown.

Under Napolitano’s plan revealed on Nov. 13, tuition rates that have been frozen for the past three years will soon begin to increase as much as five percent each year unless the UC system receives more funding.

For example, UC students that pay a current tuition of $12,192 will have to pay a tuition cost of $12,804 next fall.

If this rate continues, by 2019 students might have to pay as much as $15,564 per semester.

“We are being honest, being honest with Californians in terms of cost and also ensuring that we are continuing to maintain the University of California in terms of academic excellence,” Napolitano said to the Associated Press.

According to the LA Times, Senate leader Kevin de León, unsatisfied with the proposal, offered an alternative to Napolitano through a letter and phone call, asking her to consider raising out-of-state tuition instead.

“California’s university system is one of the premier higher education systems in the world, and we should require that non-resident students pay a premium to attend it,” de León wrote in a message to Napolitano. “The revenue generated from these fees can be used to increase affordability and access for more Californians.”

Napolitano had a noncommittal response to de León during a meeting with The Sacramento Bee editorial board.

“Obviously that’s something to be looked at,” Napolitano said. “It would not in and of itself solve this problem.”

De León argued to the LA Times for an out-of-state tuition increase by evaluating the benefits of nonresidents.

“They are not paying for all the building that taxpayers of California paid for during the last 40 years,” de León said.

Not only does de León consider decades of taxpayer investment in the UC system, but he also argues that California’s economy suffers as well.

“Many foreign students take their California degrees back to their home countries,” de León said. “They become entrepreneurs that develop products that they sell back to us.”

Governor Jerry Brown acknowledged the UC financial dilemma in his budget statement released in January.

“The University has undertaken some meaningful initiative to reduce administrative costs; however, it needs to also implement models of delivering quality education at a lower cost and that improve student outcomes,” Brown said in the fiscal report.

According to the LA Times, UC students and faculty members feel misled by Brown because general revenue funds remain $460 million lower than they were seven years ago, though UC state funding has recently risen.

Problems with UC funding have been ongoing for decades, and the issue continues to require attention.

 
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            [post_date] => 2014-11-14 16:00:00
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            [post_content] => 

Faculty, staff and students discussed newly revised changes to the Executive Order at the Student Fee Advisory Committee’s (SFAC) open forum on Nov. 7.

The revised executive order provides guidance in implementing the board of trustees policy regarding students fees.

“So I had to start with [Executive Order] 1042 and review what policy already existed,” said Suzanne Espinoza, Vice President of Enrollment Services and Student Affairs.

“And the one thing that I noticed is that the original policy did not include a full definition of different category fees, and I thought that that would be useful.”

A committee of 12 voting members, both student and faculty representatives, will serve as advisors that will work with the president regarding student fee issues. Questions and concerns were raised during the open forum regarding the language and meaning of certain regulations and fees listed in the revised executive order that affect CSU Stanislaus.

Since the revision, such as the cost for miscellaneous items, fees are now viewed and addressed within individual courses. Each student is charged the same amount for tuition while extra course fees are then assigned accordingly.

As the policy is different at each university, CSU Stanislaus is working on addressing new changes to the policy derived from the Executive Order 540.

“I am not changing the executive order,” Espinoza said. “I am only adding a section from the frequently asked questions document.”

At the open forum, the idea of working more closely with Associated Students Inc. and having more student representatives was addressed. This would allow for student suggestions and concerns to be more present in discussions.

The next open forum is scheduled to take place on Nov. 18 where the discussion will continue. The newly revised policy form is posted on the school’s website for students to view.

[post_title] => Student fees addressed at open forum [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => student-fees-addressed-open-forum [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-11-14 13:11:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-14 20:11:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2957 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2955 [post_author] => 87 [post_date] => 2014-11-14 15:00:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-14 22:00:07 [post_content] =>

Between Jan. 1 and Nov. 1, there have been 5,400 fires in California, burning 91,912 acres over the course of 2014, according to Cal Fire’s Incident Information.

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) Conservation Camp Program (CCP) has provided inmate firefighters to aid in fighting the flames.

Since 1915, this program has aimed to provide an able and trained workforce for Cal Fire as well as help with community conservation projects.

In 2008, this program worked with the Turlock Fire Department.

Through the CDCR and Cal Fire, the Central California Women’s Facility was given the task of restoring a 1927 American LaFrance Quadruple Combination City Service Ladder Truck for the Turlock Fire Department and the City of Turlock.

For almost an entire year, six female inmates worked on and completed the restoration of the truck.

“It’s important to the city of Turlock and to the Turlock Fire as it will be used for parades, school programs, and other community functions,” said Deborah Patrick, California Corrections Women’s Facility Warden, in a press release.

“It also provided several of our inmates the opportunity to put their vocational skills into practice, increasing their odds of success for eventual re-entry into their community and future job prospects.”

These inmate fire crews are trained to respond to many different types of emergencies, which include fires, floods, search and rescue missions and earthquakes.

Cal Fire states that the CCP inmates provide about three million person-hours fighting fires and responding to emergencies along with seven million person-hours for community service projects.

During the off-season, inmates working with fire departments earn anywhere from $1.45 to $3.90 per day for community service projects.

According to Cal Fire, the CCP has 39 camps located all across California that house roughly 4,300 inmates.

Through these camps, the inmate firefighters allow Cal Fire to work 196 fire crews all year long.

[post_title] => Inmate firefighters help fight California flames [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => inmate-firefighters-help-fight-california-flames [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-11-14 13:10:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-14 20:10:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2955 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2952 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2014-11-14 13:08:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-14 20:08:47 [post_content] =>

The California State University, Stanislaus fiscal year operating fund budget was presented on Oct. 24 for the 2014-2015 fiscal year.

Russ Giambelluca, Vice President of Business and Finance, introduced the key points of university budget changes in a memo and summary to CSU Stanislaus President Joseph F. Sheley and Members of the University Community.

The budget allocation included plans exclusive to CSU Stanislaus, as well as the future of the CSU System-Wide Budget.

In a memo from President Sheley prefacing the budget summary, he identified that planning had begun this past summer, and budget requests were presented to UBAC (University Budget Advisory Committee) during Spring 2014. During this time, vice presidents from each department presented their monetary requests, at which point it was apparent the campus would face challenges in meeting sufficient financial needs.

The immediacy of these challenges to students becomes apparent when touching upon the issue of college affordability.

Though financial aid is a mandatory budget allocation, there is a projected decrease of over one percent in money allotted to this area when compared to the previous fiscal year.  This amounts over to $530,000 less devoted to financial aid for 2014-2015.   

“As a recipient of financial aid, I find a decrease in its funding saddening,” Garrett Smart (junior, Communication Studies) said. “The added stress of financial struggles can be detrimental to a student’s college career and even hinder them from finishing. More money should go to people pursuing education, not less.”

Russ Giambelluca highlighted the necessity for careful allocation of funds to the most immediate needs in the budget introduction.

Based on recommended priorities and the perceived need to approach budgeting conservatively over the next few years in the face of little new revenue likely coming our way, we have adopted a multiyear, diversified source approach this year in an effort to extend our expenditure capacity,” Giambelluca said.

With the 2016 phasing out of Proposition 30, the state measure which implemented a temporary tax increase to fund education, there are expected shifts in where money will be distributed as well as methods to bring money in.

This year, CSU Stanislaus will meet its obligation to the faculty and staff of the campus by adding dollars to the compensation pool, another mandatory allocation for CSU Stanislaus where dollars go to faculty, staff and management salaries and benefits.

Last year no money was taken from the budget for this purpose however, this year allotment to this area is expected to raise from zero, to nearly two percent, or close to two million dollars.

Portions of the budget have also been allocated in the form of one-time commitments that are expected to generate revenue.

These investments include more attention dedicated to the International Education Program.  With new enrollment growth funding restricted, and the sunset of Proposition 30, revenue from one-time investments is aimed at offsetting possible reductions in these limited times.

President Sheley is in agreement with the new and unchanged plans presented, and in a memo has acknowledged that the future requires additional precaution when facing the University’s financial decisions.

The CSU System-Wide Budget highlights decreases in funding mirroring the expectations for CSU Stanislaus, a limited availability of resources which all campuses are faced with recognizing and protecting.

The campus budget for the 2014-2015 fiscal year can be found at www.csustan.edu/UBAC.

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            [post_date] => 2014-11-20 12:30:34
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            [post_content] => In a world of online social interaction and limitless ways to stay connected with friends and peers, there will always be people who take advantage of the situation.

Since social media’s inception, people have been logging on to chat with friends and post pictures from vacations or other memorable occasions. Unfortunately also since its inception, social media has introduced experienced online users who will post cruel and insensitive comments or material directed at others.

These rogue users feed on the anger, frustration and pain of those they are terrorizing. Similar to the way a child plays the mimicking game or that game where they continuously ask, “Why?” to whatever you tell them.

While it’s easy to shrug off a small child’s annoying ways, it is much more difficult for young adults to deal with the same kind of cruelty from their peers. According to dosomething.org, nearly 43 percent of kids have been bullied online. One in four users has had it happen more than once. Additionally, bullied victims are two to nine times more likely to consider committing suicide.

We are all familiar with the potential outcome cyberbullying can yield: Columbine High School, Sparks, NV and most recently Marysville, WA. These flashbulb memories are some of the most iconic occurrences that have brought national attention to the issue of cyberbullying. Instances where adolescents or young adults have been pushed over the edge by the bullying of their peers.

Victims of cyberbullying are subjected to pain in many different forms. According to dosomething.org, the most common medium for cyberbullying is the cell phone. With the capabilities of modern smartphones to stay connected to all forms of social media, like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, the potential for online bullying to occur has skyrocketed.

There is a relatively new social media app that has been growing in popularity among young adults. The application Yik Yak has been storming across the country for the past year, growing in popularity on college campuses in particular at a very high rate.

The app allows users to post anonymously to a general page and anyone within a mile and a half radius of your smartphone or mobile device can see what you have posted.

According to nobullying.com, 81 percent of young people think bullying online is easier to get away with than bullying in person. This statistic was taken in 2012 — a whole year before Yik Yak first launched.

A similar article published in 2012 in Psychology Today cited a study released by the University of British Columbia, confirming the higher incidence of cyberbullying versus traditional bullying. The study reported that approximately 25 to 30 percent of the young people surveyed admitted experiencing or taking part in cyberbullying. In comparison, only 12 percent said the same about traditional bullying.

The 2012 study also answers, in part, the question of why people cyberbully. Of the youth surveyed for the study, 95 percent indicated what was posted online was intended to be a joke, with only 5 percent meant to cause harm. Anonymity and lack of tone in what is meant by a post – similar to how emails are worded – can clearly lead to a feeling of being bullied thereby becoming one’s reality.
            [post_title] => Yik Yak: New app brings up old problems
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            [post_date] => 2014-11-20 12:23:15
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            [post_content] => There are so many ways to keep up with sports in this day in age—from watching them on every high-definition channel to streaming them on computers or keeping up with them on cell phone apps. With so many imitations of the same sports stream, fans need something other than a list of scores to keep them entertained in the sports world. Stanislaus alumnus, Ken Mashinchi has done just that.

A year after graduating as the valedictorian, Mashinchi is attending the University of Southern California and studying at the Annenberg Graduate School of Journalism. As part of his Sports and Society class at USC, Ken is required to produce a sports blog posting once a week. His blog is called “Kickin’ it with Ken.” 

“I try and find topics that aren't completely killed in the media but are still well-known and time-relevant," said Ken Mashinchi.

The blog features articles revolving around Ken's perspective or opinion on current issues. This includes football-related injuries, problems with the NFL, retiring legends or my favorite, The Sad Life of a Sports Fan.

For an interesting sports read, a developing alumni voice or to simply support an upcoming journalist, go to kmashinchi.wordpress.com. 
            [post_title] => Kickin' it With Ken provides fresh take on sports journalism
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            [post_date] => 2014-11-20 12:21:04
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            [post_content] => “Without struggle, there is no progress.”
 
This motto has been a part of the Omega Nu Omega (ONO) family and has enforced the desire to achieve scholastic excellence, unity and loyalty amongst members for 11 years.
 
Seven women and three men, all seeking to instill the values of education and cultural awareness, created the organization that bonded the group for life. 
 
ONO was the first Greek organization to step and stroll at Stanislaus. The organization also performed the first probate on campus in spring of 2013.  They’ve focused on  encouraging members to become successful attributes to society and achieve higher education. ONO has allowed students to gain experience by providing members the opportunity to hold executive positions that structure the fraternity.
 
“As I held presidency and other  positions for my organization last academic school year, I was able to develop character and improve my leadership skills for my organization,” Davonte Wilson (senior, Sociology) said.
 
The organization is based off the divine nine—the first nine black fraternity and sororities founded in the United States. The black panther mascot is used to symbolize self defense and the blue rose represents the love and loyalty amongst all ONO members.
 
“We are African-American-based, however, we have become a multicultural family, and together we have re-established the organization to be what it is today,” Wilson said.
 
ONO members work together to raise awareness in the campus community by allying with their HIV/AIDS philanthropy.
 
ONO is anticipating their second annual World Aids Day planned for Dec. 3. Informational signs will be posted around campus and red ribbons will be sold for a dollar, allowing the campus community to unite with ONO and raise awareness.
 
All donations will benefit the local non-profit Community Impact Central Valley organization that serves as a support system for families affected by domestic abuse.
 
ONO is planning on extending their family soon by establishing new chapters. If you have any questions regarding the organization or getting involved, get in contact with any ONO member.
 
“I want to be remembered as an individual who helped pave the way for future members,” Wilson said. “And demonstrate that through hard work, dedication, discipline, courage and a supportive Greek family, anything is possible.”

            [post_title] => Organization Feature: Omega Nu Omega steps and strolls on campus
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            [post_date] => 2014-11-13 11:40:01
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            [post_title] => Photos: NAK Homeless Awareness Week
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            [post_date] => 2014-11-24 17:10:13
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            [post_content] => Despite student-led protests during its proposal, 12 out of the 23 CSU campuses now require what administrators call the Student Success Fee.

It’s more like, “Student Suppress Fee.”

This mandatory payment is a type of category II campus-based cost that students must pay in order to enroll or attend certain CSU campuses.

The annual fees are determined by each campus and range anywhere from $35 to $780.

Tuition has been frozen at $5,472 for the past three years. Is this fee not just another way to integrate a hidden tuition increase?

Campus-based fees have risen 283 percent since 2002, increasing nearly every year, according to the Sonoma State Star.

CSU Chancellor Timothy White, along with the Board of Trustees, approved the Student Success Fee for several campuses across the state.

A survey regarding the fee was given to CSU students in 2012, according to the Sonoma State Star. Results showed 68 percent of surveyors claimed the cost would force them to take on more loans while 59 percent said they would need more job hours in order to make payments.

“We pay more than enough for books, tuition and parking as it is.  Where is all this money going?” Igdalia Covarrubias (senior, English) said with concern.  “I think it’s going to keep increasing.  Protesting didn’t even matter since they just passed the fee. Our voices aren’t being heard.”

To reiterate Covarrubias, where exactly is our money going?

In the same year (coincidentally) as this suspicious fee was implemented, the California State University Board of Trustees also approved a 3 percent salary increase for CSU executives.

According to The Daily Aztec, San Diego State President Elliot Hirshman will have his compensation increased to $412,000 with a $50,000 supplement, a $1,000 car allowance and housing expenses provided for him.

This makes Hirshman the highest compensated CSU executive, currently second only to Chancellor White, who makes $410,000 with a $30,000 supplement and provided housing expenses.


Let me get this straight: Students are forced to pay a disguised tuition fee while executives get a substantial raise?  Red flag!  Something needs to be done about this.
            [post_title] => Are students paying for executive raises?
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            [post_content] => According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average doctor’s income ranges from $239,000 to $258,000. The average salary of full-professors at public institutions is approximately $127,000. Miami Marlins outfielder Giancarlo Stanton recently agreed to a 13-year contract worth up to $325 million.

Professional athletes are grossly overpaid in today’s sporting world. Yes, they put their bodies through hell and back to do what they do, and yes, they sacrifice countless hours with their friends and family to play for their respective teams, but are they really worth every penny?

No, they are not.

Who’s to say that the mental and physical stress that a doctor or teacher faces is worth tens of millions of dollars less than that of professional athletes? These athletes are making significantly more than even the President of the United States.

According to Brian Warner of celebritynetworth.com, Barack Obama’s total income was $481,098 in 2013. Comparing his salary to that of another mega star’s contract, you can see how certain people judge the worth of someone’s profession.

LeBron James recently signed a new, two-year contract in July of 2014 with the Cleveland Cavaliers worth $42.1 million, a contract many considered to be a risk due to the fact that he could have signed a four-year deal worth $94.5 million.

To say that James took a risk in agreeing to make over $20 million for the next few years is absurd. To add insult to injury, LeBron James makes over 41 times what President Obama makes.

The message this sends to the average person is that the “work” LeBron does is 41 times more difficult than the work President Obama does. Apparently playing basketball is more challenging than running an entire country— a ridiculous and insulting comparison. This goes to show just how much we misplace the worth of someone’s actions in today’s society.

Maybe these athletes are paid so insanely much because of their influence on the advertising market in their respective cities. But they also get paid obscene amounts of money for that; star forward from the Oklahoma City Thunder Kevin Durant signed a 10-year contract worth $300 million with the iconic sports brand, Nike.

The rich just keep getting richer, and for who knows what? It is outrageous to think that the amount of cash being raked in by professional athletes is anything other than unjust.
            [post_title] => Professional athletes paid too much
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            [post_date] => 2014-11-18 16:47:43
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            [post_content] => Imagine you’re walking down the street and you see someone wearing tattered old clothing and sleeping on a bus stop bench. Perhaps you’ve seen the same person standing near a busy intersection holding a piece of cardboard with the words, “Homeless— Please Help,” written on it. We all have seen it, but are we really aware of what’s being done to help the homeless in the Central Valley?

Homelessness has become a growing problem in many cities across the Central Valley. In an article on the public’s perception of the homeless crisis by Anya Reeser, Reeser said, “At this time, there are an estimated 571 chronically homeless individuals in Turlock alone.”

Why is nothing being done to help the homeless? Citizens, politicians and lawmakers alike seem to have turned a blind eye to this growing problem— not only in Turlock, but also in other Central Valley cities, such as the city of Manteca. In fact, Manteca just recently passed a series of laws addressing homelessness— and those actions have not been without controversy.

Manteca leaders recently passed laws making homeless encampments illegal, as well as banning urinating and defecating in public.

On the surface, it sounds as if the city of Manteca is prosecuting these individuals for being homeless. Manteca has drawn national attention for passing these laws. But more importantly, it has brought to light that many people feel the homeless are being treated very poorly here in the Central Valley.

However, when we take a deeper look into these actions taken by civic leaders, we find out that things aren’t always as they seem.

City Manager Karen McLaughlin said the city’s actions mirror existing state law. So why pass legislation locally that currently exists?

“By prohibiting these actions at the local level, our own city attorney can enforce the violations,” McLaughlin said. “Otherwise, Manteca would have to rely on the San Joaquin County District Attorney’s Office, which has its hands full with having to enforce other violations throughout San Joaquin County, including the city of Stockton,” she said.

“When compared with crimes being committed in other areas of the county, these homeless violations wouldn’t take priority at the county level,” McLaughlin said. “Passing local legislation helps us to take control locally.”

The controversy over Manteca’s actions has received international attention. Facebook postings on a site called, “Brave New Justice: Films,” have prompted telephone calls and emails from across the country and beyond. McLaughlin said she has received complaints from Canada and the United Kingdom.

McLaughlin said the difficulty is in balancing concerns of the local community— the residents and business owners— along with the rights of those who are faced with homelessness. Another challenge is trying to identify resources available for the homeless who want assistance versus those who are homeless by choice, she stated.

The city of Turlock faced a similar issue and ended up partnering with the Turlock Gospel Mission to convert a former warehouse into Turlock’s first year-round homeless shelter, according to an article by John Holland of The Modesto Bee. According to Holland’s article, the $1.8 million project will feature 34 beds for men and 22 for women and children. They hope to open the shelter in December of 2014.

Clearly, there is more to the growing homeless problem afflicting the Central Valley. As complex as the issues are that cause homelessness, the solutions are equally complicated. What is evident is that any long-term solutions will take time and partnership resources from not only local government, but also from churches, local citizens and other members of the community.
            [post_title] => Homelessness in Central Valley not hopeless
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            [post_date] => 2014-11-17 15:36:30
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-17 22:36:30
            [post_content] => Black Friday has been a long tradition where department stores open early the day after Thanksgiving and have the biggest sales of the year.

But last year, a number of stores opened as early as 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day. This coming Black Friday some stores, such as Best Buy, will open as early as 5 p.m.

I understand wanting to get a good deal, but at this point it’s almost humorous. Black Friday has become an embarrassment, and the biggest culprits are the consumers.

We always want to blame the businesses for taking people away from the Thanksgiving table, but businesses wouldn’t do this if it weren’t for people camping out days before.

It’s the goal of the business world to find the most efficient way to sell their products, and if we keep going to stores earlier every year, it will not stop.

We live in a very busy world; people don’t spend enough time with their loved ones anymore. Thanksgiving is supposed to be one of the few times when families get together.

Everyone likes to say that family is the most important thing, but these days, we are too materialistic. According to the Huffington Post, Americans spent $12.3 billion on Black Friday last year. Black Friday gives these people the opportunity to obtain a variety of material goods at the lowest possible prices.

The initial intention of Black Friday was a good idea. We wake up at five in the morning, get some Starbucks and try to beat people to various items.

But we have given Black Friday precedent over Thanksgiving itself, and we can’t let this continue.

Spend time with your parents, siblings, kids and whoever else is important in your life. Don’t let this holiday virtually make Thanksgiving an afterthought (and we’re not far off).

Going to Black Friday in the middle of the afternoon on Thanksgiving says a lot about what our society finds important; we need to change that perspective.

I understand times are still tough, and great deals on Black Friday are hard to resist. But some things are more important.

Money does buy some happiness, but it won’t buy you the greatest happiness. Spend time with your families. It will be worth a lot more than anything you can buy.
            [post_title] => Black Thursday
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            [post_content] => The Stanislaus Warriors suited up in their shin guards and cleats and went into battle for the CCAA Men’s Soccer Tournament Championship title. The Warriors faced off against the Cal State L.A. Eagles in the semi-finals.

The first half ended in 0-0 stalemate with the Warriors goalie Clint Long keeping the scoreboard clean while tallying four saves. By halftime the Warriors had taken six shots, and the Eagles had taken seven.

The second half ended as scoreless as the first half, 0-0 sending them into double overtime where once again Long kept the scoreboard clean despite 13 shot-attempts by the Eagles. The Warriors’ 11 shots also were in vain, which sent both teams into a shoot out of penalty kicks.

The Warriors came out on top, winning the penalty shootout 4-2. Carlos Gavino, Gerardo Cazares, Brady Taylor and Matthew Waldron, all making their penalty shots, while Long held the Eagles to just two makes in five attempts.

“It’s so much better to win at home,” Long said. “Having everyone scream your name is amazing.”

After the game Coach Taylor praised the determination of the goalie and midfielders. “The unsung heroes are the midfielders who worked so hard tonight,” Coach Dana Taylor said.

Two days later, the Warriors suited up again to take on the Cal Poly Pomona Broncos for the CCAA Men’s Soccer Tournament Championship. By the end of regulation play, the game was tied 1-1. Ramiro Ceja scored on a header assisted by Gavino.

Meanwhile, Long allowed one goal despite three impressive saves.  This game, like the first, went into double overtime where both teams remained scoreless. Long had another save in the extra periods, which sent the game into a penalty shootout.

Sadly, the Warriors could not pull out the win and fell short 0-3 in the penalty shootout.

“They saw us doing penalty kicks the night before,” Coach Taylor said. “We already had the pressure of penalty kicks, and their team already knew where we were going to go.”

The men’s soccer team had a great season, and we look forward to their return next year.
            [post_title] => Men's soccer final game
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            [post_content] => Three straight wins have sent the Warriors to the Elite Eight competition of the NCAA tournament following victories over Seattle Pacific, Western Washington University and Cal Poly Pomona.

Success is not unknown to the women’s soccer team, as they won CCAA championship titles in 2011 and 2013. After missing the CCAA tournament altogether this season, no one could have predicted a better outcome for the Warriors in the national tournament.

Goals from Jade Poon, Jordan Moineau, Tina Benson and Kirsten Coleman have led the Warriors to outscoring their national opponents 5-1 and keeping their opponents scoreless in the last two matches. The Warriors advanced to face No. 7 ranked Colorado School of Mines.

The Orediggers were outplayed as the Warriors maintained possession of the ball for most of the game and outshot their opponents 7-2. However, none of those shots touched the back of the net and the teams faced off in a penalty kick shootout. It was a shootout the Warriors would not win as their season ended in the Elite Eight of the NCAA Division II Soccer tournament.

 
            [post_title] => Women's soccer at it again
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            [post_date] => 2014-11-25 14:31:41
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            [post_content] => Picking up where they left off after last season’s historic playoff appearance, the men’s basketball team is currently undefeated through three matches.

Kicking the season off at Ed & Bertha Fitzpatrick Arena, the Warriors played in an exhibition game against Bristol University. The Bristol Bears of Anaheim rallied for a total of 70 points, but it wasn’t enough as the Warriors slid by with 78 total points. The exhibition game gave way for the Warriors to make a statement early in the season.

Following the exhibition game, the Warriors headed to San Rafael to compete in a preseason challenge hosted by the Dominican University Penguins. After taking a 10-point lead to finish the first half of the game, the Warriors scraped by with a two-point victory.

To round out the short preseason tournament, the Warriors faced the Montana State Billings. For the third straight win, the Warriors defeated the Billings by a margin of less than 10 points. The Warriors owed their victory to their success at the free-throw line in the second half of the game, scoring a total of 22 free-throws.

Senior guard, Chris Read, led the Warriors offense with 52 points and teamed up with fellow seniors Wes Bartole, who added 34 points and 28 rebounds, and Clinton Tremelling, who added 27 points that included six three-pointers, while freshman guard Christian Bayne added 26 points. Bartole was named to the All-Tournament team, and Read was named the tournament MVP.

Despite the Warriors’ success in the win category, they are shooting less than 40 percent for attempted field goals and attempted three-pointers– categories they will need to improve if they hope to have another chance at the NCAA tournament. Warrior fans hope to see continued success overall and offensive improvement in the Cal Baptist Classic, which the team will participate in next week in Riverside.
            [post_title] => Warriors start strong
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            [post_content] => The word “tough” just does not accurately describe the struggles of the Warriors Volleyball team this season. Following the worst season of her coaching career at CSU Stanislaus, Coach Lore has resigned from head coach of the volleyball team giving “personal family matters” as the determining factor for her decision.

A 2-24 record can be hard on any team, but for 10-year head coach Christina Lore, success on the court hasn’t been in the books.

In her 10 years at Stanislaus, Lore coached the volleyball team to four, 10-win seasons. The highest ranking the Warriors earned under her leadership peaked at eighth place in 2010 after a 13-win season. During the 2010 season, the Warriors were one win away from their first winning season in at least five years, but they fell just one win short.

The Warriors winning percentage is less than 40 percent over the last eight years. Coach Lore has faced 63 total wins and 166 total losses in her career at Stanislaus. However, Warrior Athletics still praised Lore and thanked her for the time she served as the head coach. But nevertheless, the still young volleyball program will be in search for a new head coach during this offseason.

 
            [post_title] => Lore Resigns
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