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            [post_date] => 2015-03-03 21:10:29
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            [post_content] => 

Associated Student Incorporated (ASI) invited Turlock Mayor, Gary Soiseth, to California State University, Stanislaus  on March 3 at 4 p.m.

Soiseth addressed the audience on the progress of the city and answered students’ questions.

The Mayor plans to make an effort to frequently visit the university.

“We’re going to try to make it as often as possible,” Soiseth said. “We have a pretty big schedule, but seeing events like this are great and we’re going to try and get on campus as often as possible.”

Soiseth addressed the state of the scholarship he promised during his campaign.

“We’re going to hopefully launch that in the fall this year,” Soiseth said.

“What we’re going to do is list it under policy proposal for students and once they push that forward we’ll talk about actual solutions.”

He continued to detail the specific ways in which students could be awarded money through funding from the city.

“I have control of my own salary at city hall, so why don’t I take those funds and put them in a bank account here at Stanislaus and once a year here in the fall, I have a competition,” Soiseth said.

“A public policy competition where I have students compete for $1,000, $2,000 and have them address and solve some of our problems.”

Soiseth also spoke on his plans to improve the campus.

“I think it’s not very neat to talk about or cool to talk about – but zoning,” Soiseth said. “[Zoning is] what we’re going to do around the campus edges so it doesn’t become an island here at Stanislaus.

“Also we’re going to try and bring events to Stanislaus, one of the things is the Fourth of July Fireworks,” Soiseth said.

The fireworks are set to be viewed from the grassy area near the intramural sport fields.

The mayor continued to discuss the ongoing effort to strengthen the relationship between the university and the city.

“One of the things we’re trying to do is not only lure you out from the campus, but also what can we do around the campus that makes it more attractive to come work, play and enjoy Turlock?” Soiseth said.

“One of the best ways to market Turlock is to showcase CSU Stanislaus and to show what a great campus it is.”

[post_title] => Mayor Soiseth visits CSU Stanislaus [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => mayor-soiseth-visits-csu-stanislaus [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-04 17:00:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-05 00:00:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3955 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3950 [post_author] => 85 [post_date] => 2015-03-03 17:46:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-04 00:46:44 [post_content] => Update: Check out our coverage of the event to find out more details about what Mayor Soiseth discussed at the event. Turlock Mayor Gary Soiseth misses teaching at California State University, Stanislaus and wants students to know that he may return one day in the near future. Make sure to follow The Signal on TwitterInstagram and like us on Facebook for the live message from Soiseth and other breaking news daily.   [post_title] => A message for CSU Stanislaus from Mayor Soiseth [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => message-csu-stanislaus-mayor-soiseth [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-04 13:49:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-04 20:49:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3950 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3945 [post_author] => 85 [post_date] => 2015-03-03 17:21:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-04 00:21:30 [post_content] => Beginning today at 4 p.m. at the California State University, Stanislaus Event Center, Mayor Gary Soiseth will be answering questions to students on campus. Be sure to join him for free food and giveaways from the Associated Students Inc. [post_title] => Mayor Soiseth on campus [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => mayor-soiseth-campus [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-03 17:27:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-04 00:27:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3945 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3940 [post_author] => 82 [post_date] => 2015-03-03 14:38:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-03 21:38:16 [post_content] => CSU Student Organizations for Free Association (CSU SOFA) announced their endorsement for a bill proposed by California State Assemblywoman Shannon Grove (R-Bakersfield) called the Student Freedom of Association Act. CSU SOFA was founded in September 2014 in order to band together concerned individuals and student organizations concerned with protecting their First Amendment right to freedom of association. The bill was proposed to fight the "Open Membership Policy" requirement of all California State University, University of California and California Community College organizations. The policy requires that membership and leadership positions within recognized student organizations be open for all students, even if those students disagree with the purpose or beliefs of the club. Under Executive Order 1068, "no campus shall recognize any fraternity, sorority, living group, honor society or other student organization that discriminates on the basis of race, religion, national origin, ethnicity, color, age, gender, marital status, citizenship, sexual orientation or disability. For example, under the "Open Membership Policy," Christian organizations cannot require their leaders to be Christian and a Republican club must accept registered democrats. Nate Honeycutt, CSU SOFA Co-Founder, feels the "Open Membership Policy" is counter productive. "CSU Administrators are forcing diversity with student organizations at the expense of diversity among student organizations," Honeycutt said in a press release issued Feb. 27. "This ultimately impairs the intellectual and cultural diversity on campus instead of protecting it."   [post_title] => Assemblywoman proposes bill to protect First Amendment rights of student organizations [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => assemblywoman-proposes-bill-protect-first-amendment-rights-student-organizations [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-03 21:17:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-04 04:17:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3940 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )
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            [post_content] => According to San Francisco Bay Area-based art critic Mark Van Proyen, art criticism and art have been deteriorating and will continue on that way. During his lecture and discussion titled, “What Happened to Art Criticism,” presented on Feb. 20, at California State University, Stanislaus, Van Proyen analyzed and addressed the downward spiral of the art world.

“The short answer to my self-addressed question is this (…) overhead shot of an art fair,” Van Proyen said as he described the image of a building full of white walls with art hung up as far as the eye can see.

“And what an art fair is is basically a lot of commercial galleries get together and they rent out little cubicle spaces in these giant exhibition halls. The exhibition halls themselves might be three- or four-hundred thousand square feet, so they might pack two- or three-hundred galleries into these things.”

These conditions provide art shoppers with the opportunity to look at thousands of works in one fair and then thousands more in another fair during the same weekend. It allows art collectors or shoppers the chance to find pieces, to buy them and flip the piece for a profit or donate them to a museum for a hefty tax deduction. Instead of art being cultural commentary, it's being used for monetary gain.

“To see something as art requires something the eye cannot descry-- an atmosphere of artistic theory, a knowledge of the history of art: an artworld,” Arthur Danto wrote in his 1964 essay. Hand in hand with this quote shared by Van Proyen is the institutional theory of art; if a piece has been designated as a work of art by a representative of the “artworld”, it is a work of art. In Danto's eyes a representative of the “artworld” was an art critic, an art curator, or sometimes an artist.

From that moment on, the empowerment to designate a work of art shifted from art critics into the hands of institutions causing art criticism to decline. Following this, a new theory of art was introduced, and the shift in quality and quantity can be observed as having flip-flopped.  More and more is considered art and less and less is given to constructively guide these artists. Van Proyen made it clear when asked if any contemporary art was fascinating to him that he was not impressed by anything from the past decade.

“You can't tell what art is anymore unless you have a lot of intellectual baggage backing it up,” Van Proyen said. “There's now a world of regulated experience that happens through art fairs, through big museums, small museums and also through entities that are called international biennials.”
            [post_title] => Death of Criticism: monetization of art threatens art quality
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            [post_content] => “I just wrote it as a, its sort of my mid-life crisis, sort of all my fantasies in one.”

What author E.L. James said to ABC news is key in trying to understand the film adaptation of her controversial work, 50 Shades of Grey. Despite slander, praise and even confusion in regards to her sexy novel hitting the big screen, James said, “you cannot own someone’s response, and they are perfectly entitled to their opinion.” Great, here’s some perspective from someone who didn’t read the books, but watched the movie.

We have virginal English Major Anastacia Steele who finds herself smitten with young billionaire Christian Grey after an interview that turns from somewhat professional to intensely personal.  The brief time frame in which their flame develops is somewhat unrealistic, hinging onto a single encounter that escalated into soul-robbing eye contact and lustful tension.  Of course the man can’t be perfect, and he’s not--unless you’re into BDSM.  Nothing wrong with that, but Ana demonstrates she falls on the opposite end of the spectrum; reluctant to sign Christian’s written contract detailing consent to anything from anal fisting and suspension--and does she ever sign?  No, she’s too busy trying it.

Show us some ice cubes sliding over Ana’s body, ankles bound by rope in the “Red Room of Pain”, a peep of Christian’s junk and we get an idea of what she’s agreed to. What’s more, that about sets the pornographic standard of the movie--nothing you wouldn’t see on HBO. However, the perhaps the most peculiar thing as a viewer is that we are watching this in the company of strangers; unsure if the middle-aged couple next to you is giggling out of shock, or because they realized they have the same collection of leather floggers.

There’s something unbelievable about a girl casually losing her virginity over the course of a handful of conversations, then proceeding to get it on immediately after as the film shows.  Or getting it on at all after being told “If you were mine, you wouldn’t be able to walk for a week.” A tad corny but one could argue this is part of developing Christian’s character. Ana, like anyone, is entitled to her taste.

Jokes aside, we see Ana slip into to the life of handcuffs, whips and masking tape.  Maybe being surprised with an Audi and helicopter rides has something to do with surrendering her wrists to a silk tie, but whether we identify this as bribery or a mutual exchange, E.L. James has elaborated.

“I’d read a couple of things about BDSM and I was thinking what if you met someone and you didn’t want to do this, what would happen then?” She told ABC News, “I’d go and say, 'could we try this,' and my husband would look and me and roll his eyes and say 'mmmm ok'.” James admits she is an unashamed slave to the desire of a man on top, and what about Ana?

If Ms. Steele didn’t desire to be tied down by the relationship, perhaps she could have ran for the hills when Christian told her, “you should steer clear of me, I’m not the man for you,” or should not have insisted he “just open the door” to his “playroom” after he hesitates and welcomes her to leave any time. Considering that Ana isn’t put off by his claim, “I don’t make love, I fuck, hard,” nor does she use the safe word “red” or “yellow” to terminate the rough lashing in the final scene, we can say the girl has agreed to it. So what makes the film different than a regular S and M porno?

If blindfolds and whipping don’t dominate your interest, somewhere in between the scene of the couple flying through the clouds to Ellie Goulding’s “Love Me Like You Do,” and witnessing an intimate dance to Frank Sinatra in Christian’s piano room, you’ll fall in love. There is a touch of suspense and a glimmer of passion when he shows up unexpectedly. These slips into chivalry, accidental or not, leave us hopeful that just as Ana yields to Christian’s sexual desires, he will submit to her want for romance.

Perhaps only those that enjoy BDSM will understand how the relationship between Christian and Ana, like any other, searches for equilibrium in a constant seesaw between romance and sexuality.

"Well it’s a love story,” James told ABC, “and people who fall in love have a lot of sex.”
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            [post_content] => "All the power to the people."

This is the slogan of the Black Panther Party (BPP). Co-founder of the BPP, Bobby Seale, explained on Feb. 19 at California State University, Stanislaus, that no matter what color your complexion is, you deserve to know you are a first class citizen of the United States and more importantly, a first class human being.

Seale went on to say in his discussion on Thursday afternoon, before his evening event at the Mainstage Theatre, that no matter your hair color, eye color, complexion, height or weight we are less than .5% different. It was his objective for the BPP to organize the people and fulfill the BPP's ten point platform in order to achieve equality and to bring power to the people. One way the BPP did this was by arming members to observe police officers in order to challenge the brutality that was occurring in black neighborhoods.

“I led an armed delegation into the California state legislature May 2, 1967," Seale said. "My little organization was only six months old. We were ragtag (…) but it was not an organization of thugs as Ronald Regan, the governor of California at the time, tried to say we were. I resented it, being called a thug. You know, you didn't call the Klu Klux Klan thugs. You didn't call all the other guys in the National Rifle Association thugs. They had guns and rifles. I was raised up with guns.”

The BPP faced even more discrimination when they launched their Free Breakfast for Children Program. According to Seale, Federal Bureau of Investigation Director J. Edgar Hoover stated that the Free Breakfast for Children Program was "a threat to the internal security of America” and that the only reason why the BPP had guns was to go into white neighborhoods shooting.

When in the Great Chicago '7' Conspiracy Trial as the Eighth Defendant, Seale was bound and gagged to a metal folding chair so that he would not "disrupt [the] court." When he was struggling against his bonds, he remembered that in that struggle he was acting like a free man.

“The psychology of wanting to be free or demanding to be free, that's very, very, very important,” Seale said. “Learn to hitch your wagon to the continuing people's human liberation struggle. That's what this is about, and that's what I was about in the 1960s.”
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            [post_content] => KCSS kicked off the first official open mic night at Cafe La Mo on Main St. in Turlock on Feb. 18.

After a rough start for Cafe La Mo in creating an open mic night, the business was happy to have KCSS reach out to them to rebuild the event. The first attempt to have this open mic night was quickly shut down due to licensing issues. Luckily, KCSS joined forces with Cafe La Mo to solve these problems.

Open mic night attendees were pleasantly surprised with the turnout and happy to come out and support local musicians and a local business.

Audience member Austin High expressed his appreciation and excitement towards KCSS activism in the music scene.

"I feel like the music scene was really dying out around here, there aren't many venues and now that KCSS is working on this open mic night and putting out the compilation album it's really nice," High said. "Especially for me since I'm getting back into music now it's more motivating for me knowing that there is somewhere to go and share my music and hear other people's music."

Of the many, "thank yous" and other positive words from audience members, Brityn Butrick, one of the owners of Cafe La Mo, shared her appreciation and encouragement for what KCSS is doing.

“We are so excited because it got stopped so quickly when we tried to do it ourselves," Butrick said. "It was really neat when KCSS emailed us and that dream came back alive. And the turnout tonight completely blew our last one out of the water. So we're really excited for the next one."

Cafe La Mo and KCSS have high hopes for this event and hope to bring life to the music scene and, again, support local musicians to make their dreams a reality.

Open mic night will be the third Wednesday of every month with sign ups starting at 6 p.m. with a show time of 6:30 p.m.

Contact kcsspromos@gmail.com with any questions.
            [post_title] => Open mic night at Cafe La Mo sees great turnout
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            [post_content] => In our world today we are taught many things. From how to think, feel and act we are caught up in the pressures of living up to societal standards. Unfortunately, we are not told enough that we are all beautiful and perfect just the way we are and that we don’t need to change to fit a prescribed mold.

Straight size is a term that defines everyone between the sizes 00-6 and sometimes smaller. Plus Size is a term that defines women bigger than the normal straight size, 6 and above. Although, most times plus size models are normally not bigger than a size 14.

So what's the big deal with size? Why are we obsessed with the number on our tags? We are more than just a digit, just a number. It would be impossible to get every different body shape and size in one photo. It would take every single human being on the face of this planet to show how diverse we all are. This is why everybody is beautiful. Every inch of you is beautiful. Your so called "flaws" are your perfections. Imagine how boring we would all be if we all looked the same.

Instead of trying to live up to some bullshit standard or guidelines created by an oppressive force, we should look to ourselves for strength and believe and trust ourselves to create a better future.

This isn't just about female empowerment, feminism or loving yourself and your body. We are shining light on these issues because we want to live in a world where we do not have to hide from what is ours.

We refuse to hide from our own skin and feel ashamed to look in the mirror and this requires the efforts of all people --  men and women.

What we are talking about in this column is for everyone. Every body. Young, old, skinny, fat, underweight, overweight, all nationalities and all people who are willing to listen to what we have to say. We fully accept that what we say will not always be what you want to hear and sometimes the pictures we post won't be what you want to see, but honestly, we don’t give a fuck.

We need to stop making excuses and use each other as a diving board to really explore the unknown about loving ourselves and what that means about loving each other as well. We are more than a term that tries to define us by the size of our pants. We are worthy. We are desirable. We are unbreakable. We are human. We are perfectly imperfect.

Body positivity is about loving each and every body. There is no shaming that comes with this term. Tall, short, curvy, thing, and every shape in between. EveryBODY is beautiful.
            [post_title] => Not Your Girls
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            [post_date] => 2015-02-19 16:30:43
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            [post_content] => 

The implementation of new standards of security in the dorms in response to the sexual assault that occurred on Jan. 29 is a sign of a promising culture shift at California State University, Stanislaus.

The University Police Department and the administrative staff handled the situation smoothly and with great care. The crime was reported on Feb. 4 and the crime alert went out to students two days later, on Feb. 6.

Although in some life-threatening circumstances, 48 hours would be considered a slow time frame to inform students if they were in danger; in this case it spoke to the amount of detail and attention the officers and staff were paying to the crime and how to inform the public about it.

Unfortunately, statistics show us this is not and will not be an isolated incident. It will happen again.

What this incident does show is the importance of the discussions that are regularly being implemented at our university and in the surrounding community about Title IX, rape culture and campus safety. Whenever a crime like this occurs, the only positivity we can find as a group is the way people come together to offer support and solutions.

We need to continue to push toward the direction of a safer campus in which all members are aware and involved.

As this is a prominent national issue, CSU Stanislaus should serve as an example of solidarity and strength that all institutions of higher education should strive to embody.

This week, look to our articles on page two and eight that provide in greater detail information about this specific incident and the resources and events available to students in regards to campus safety and sexual violence prevention as a whole.

What The Signal wants now is to hear from you. How do you feel about this situation? Do you think the university is handling it appropriately or can they do more?

Please send us letters to the editor at editor@csusignal.com.

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Angelina Moles, left, is the Station Manager of KCSS, CSU Stanislaus’ radio station. Erika Anderson, right, is the Promotions Director of KCSS as well as a first-semester staff writer for Humanities and Arts and Entertainment for The Signal.

It is not easy being simply "you" in today's society. With media constantly spreading images of what you should and should not look like and what you should and should not do, being unapologetically "you" is nearly impossible.

But that stops here.

My name is Angelina. I am 21 years old and I am a fat, fearless babe.

At a young age I noticed I was always larger than the other kids, not only in body weight but overall physique. At eight years old I was 5’3 and around 150 pounds. I feared getting weighed in gym class and hated changing with the rest of the girls in the locker room. Even though I have always lived an active lifestyle, playing softball year-round and other physical activities, I have always been “large.” I hated my body and found no self-worth because of my size. I never felt deserving of love, I never felt beautiful and I never felt like I mattered.

But now I see my worth, and now it's your turn.

My name is Erika. I am also 21 years old and I am a determined woman.

I am 5’1 and 110 pounds and people tell me I am very intimidating because of my strong personality. My whole life people have told me that I need to stop cussing, eat more, workout and that I’m too skinny. I have even been asked if I am anorexic. I know that it is easy to judge people and we are all guilty of this, but we need to realize that judgement hurts and we are all beautiful because we are ourselves.

Let us show each other that we are all beautiful and appreciate each other's bodies.

If you are easily offended or feel that there is something wrong with two women speaking their minds about body positivity turn back now.

If you are accepting, willing to listen and learn, you can look to us each week for new information about body positivity, feminism, sex and other hot topics.

If you have any questions or topics you would like Angelina and Erika to feature in their weekly column, you may email notyourgirlss@gmail.com.

    [post_title] => Introducing: Not your girls [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => not-girls [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-02-19 14:40:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-02-19 21:40:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3478 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 13 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3167 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2015-02-05 17:01:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-02-06 00:01:56 [post_content] => Campus culture is developed over time. It is something that changes constantly. The culture at California State University, Stanislaus is much different today than what it was in 1975, or 1985 or even 2005. Even within the past four years there have been important shifts including the growth of the community’s relationship with the university, the effort to stop sexual violence and the improvement of interdepartmental cooperation. All of these are accomplishments, and should not be understated, but there is a crucial cultural shift that needs to occur in direct relation to our hazing story this week and in the work we do at The Signal in general. The Signal is undeniably the biggest fan of our administration as a whole – especially President Sheley and especially the latest team working in the Public Affairs department. With that being said,The Signal wants to see more transparency happen this year in all offices across campus. Transparency is not something that should fall solely on the shoulders of Tim Lynch, Associate Vice President of Communications and Public Affairs. It starts with the student organizations, elected ASI officials, club advisors, our Dean of Students, faculty, staff and every single per-son who works in MSR. Let us give you an example. In the case of the hazing by ODPhi (our cover story), we at The Signal were pleased to learn, after a few vague emails, that the university took the allegations seriously. While we would never expect school administration to reveal the names of perpetrators in an active investigation (un-less criminal charges were brought, which makes it a matter of public record), we do expect transparency when attempting to confirm basic facts. Basic facts like: How many Greek Life chapters have been sanctioned this year and in the past 4 years? Which organizations? Why was each organization sanctioned? Executive Director of the Student Press Law Center, Frank Lamonte, was referenced in an article by the GW Hatchet discussing the importance of the disclosure of information in forming a healthy campus culture. Yet, it was extremely difficult to get confirmation of the most basic facts and impossible to get others. Were it not for Lynch, it is doubtful we would have received what we did. As we strive to provide timely, informative news for our campus community, we want to be able to do so without displaced aggression when trying to work through a lack of transparency. There are two sides to a glass window, but it’s impossible to see through one clean side if the other is still foggy. [post_title] => Transparency: The next step in improving campus culture [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => transparency-next-step-improving-campus-culture [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-02-05 17:01:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-02-06 00:01:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3167 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )
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            [post_content] => The women's softball team took to the diamond once again for a four game series Feb. 27 and 28 against the Toros of CSU Dominguez Hills. Overall, the Warriors did not fair too well against the Toros who won the final three games of the series behind a combined team batting average of .340 and three consecutive complete games from pitchers Alyssa Valinches and Jaime Duran.

While Dominguez Hills took home more victories, the Warriors did not make it easy for them right out of the gate. During game one of the series the Warriors managed to score ten unanswered runs, nine of which came in the fourth inning which included two homeruns.

However; it was Warrior pitcher Jessica Varady (senior, Communication Studies) who stole the spotlight. Varady pitched well during game one of the four game series allowing only two runs through five innings of play. However, it was a home run to left field that put the final nail in the coffin effectively ending Friday's first matchup.

The Warriors will next face both Academy of Art, March 4 and Chico State March 6 and March 7.
            [post_title] => Softball struggles softened by powerhouse performance
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            [post_content] => The Warriors took the court Friday afternoon and walked away with their first victory of the season against Dominican on Feb. 27.
Analyssa Tallas won the winning singles match that gave the Warriors the close 5-4 winning edge with a 6-4, 6-4 score.
After doubles play, the Warriors took a 2-1 lead, then a 4-1 lead with single wins by J’Ana Diamond (at No. 2 singles) and Ebone Qualls (No. 6 singles). While Dominican took wins over No. 1, No. 4, and No.5 it looked like the match was up to Tallas to bring the Warriors in for the win.
Tallas won her first set 6-4, then managed to pull through a 6-4 win putting away her opponent, Vicari.
The Warriors then dueled out University of California, Riverside Saturday afternoon, with a hard loss of 5-1.
J’Ana Diamond battled it out against Pattugalan and gained a 2-6, 3-0 win with a forfeit from Pattugalan due to an injury to her arm giving the Warriors a win.

Jessica Laurie’s single was cut short due to rain, with a set score of 6-2, 2-3.

Next week the Warriors travel to San Diego and go head to head against Grossmont College.
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            [post_content] => CSU Stanislaus baseball faced off against rival Chico State Wildcats Friday night and were unable to walk away with the victory, as they fell short 5-1.

The Warriors (5-6) have not clinched a win at home against the Wildcats (2-2) since 2010.

Tyler Murphy started on the mound and lasted through 7 innings for CSU Stanislaus before being relieved by Martin Gomez.

A highlight for the Warriors came from Klayton Miller's huge catch in left field that robbed the Wildcats of a solo homerun.

Saturday's doubleheader against Chico State starts at noon for games two and three of the series.
            [post_title] => Warriors drop first game of series to Chico State
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            [post_content] => During every California State University, Stanislaus Warrior basketball game, one lucky student gets the opportunity to come onto the court and have the chance to win free Dean's Pizza for a year.

At the men's basketball homecoming game on Feb. 6, Alex Walker (freshman, Kinesiology) made the dream of cheesy goodness come true.

Warriors Assistant Athletics Director, Hung P. Tsai, has worked with Dean's Pizza owner and CSU Stanislaus alumni, Tom Clark, to put on this fun contest.

"We've been doing this for about six to seven years" Clark said. "Normally [we] get one winner a year."

Doing this contest at the Warrior games is something that Clark enjoys and feels is his way to give back to his alma mater.

"I enjoy doing it and being able to watch the 'ooh's and aah's' of people who come close to making it ,"  Clark said.

The rules of the contest state that you have to make a layup, free throw, three pointer and half court shot in about forty-five seconds.  Manage to get all four shots before the buzzer and the person who is competing wins free Dean's Pizza for a year.

Walker was able to get the layup without a problem but missed a few from the line and behind the arc.

"I ended up missing the first two free throws," Walker said.  "So after that I just took a deep breath and made the next one."

Alex rushed over to the half court line which is 47 feet to the basket and in his very first attempt made the basket nothing but net.

"After I released it I wasn't sure that I made it but I heard the crowd screaming,"  Walker said.  "It was crazy... it was a great feeling."

The next chance for someone to add his or her name to the list will be when the Warrior basketball teams return home Feb. 27 as both the men and women host California State University, East Bay.
            [post_title] => Half court shot hero
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            [post_content] => For most college students, juggling a social life, classes and work is a difficult task. But running their own business would be an even tougher feat. Mikayla McSweeney, however, isn’t your average college student. At age 21, McSweeney recently opened her own store in downtown Turlock, OneSixteen Bijou Boutique. Located at 116 West Main Street, OneSixteen Bijou offers stylish clothes and accessories for women of all ages.

McSweeney originally began as the jewelry vendor for Bella Forte Boutique, located just down the road from Onesixteen Bijou. As Bella Forte’s success grew, McSweeney began to help select their entire inventory and realized it was something she truly enjoyed doing, so she decided to open her own store.

“I’ve always liked fashion. I’m always trying to keep up with what’s hot, but have it at a better price,” McSweeney said. She travels to Los Angeles twice a month in order to keep the boutique stocked with the latest trends, and also orders from online vendors as far away as New York. She describes the boutique’s style as “modern bohemian,” but truly takes pride in how unique every piece in the store is. McSweeney explained how it is that distinctive quality which gives OneSixteen Bijou the edge over its competitors.

“The difference between what I offer versus, say, Target is that I have one or two of each item. Whereas when you walk into Target, you’re going to see 15 other people in the same thing.”

Since OneSixteen Bijou’s opening on Feb. 7, business has been booming. McSweeney attributes the boutique’s success to her large following on Instagram. The boutique’s account @onesixteen_bijou has over 3,500 followers, and the number grows daily. Pictures of clothing and other items available at the boutique are posted on the account daily. McSweeney also takes orders from followers.

“If someone comments on something that they want, I’ll ship it to them,” McSweeney said. She does not plan on starting a website though, since there are only a select number of most items at her boutique.

Any success story has its share of difficulties, and Mikayla McSweeney’s is no different. Her first major setback came right as her journey began: taking out a loan to get her business started.

“I did this all on my own,” she said. “It’s a lot of responsibility to take on, especially at an age where most kids are away at school.”

McSweeney is part of the Extended Education program at California State University, Stanislaus and must find enough time during the day to attend both her classes and her job. She works in the boutique during the day and goes to class at night as a Business Marketing major.

Despite the stresses of both school and managing her own business, McSweeney recognizes and appreciates just how rewarding her job can be.

“The best part is seeing people out wearing my inventory. It’s rewarding to see that people enjoy and are excited to purchase something from me.”

[caption id="attachment_3693" align="alignnone" width="960"]Courtesy of OneSixteen Bijou Courtesy of OneSixteen Bijou[/caption]
            [post_title] => Community Spotlight: CSU Stanislaus student opens downtown boutique
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            [post_content] => Crime never sleeps, or so the age old adage goes. The Turlock Police Department (TPD) has been busy ensuring the safety of our community for decades, and their service to the city of Turlock has been high in demand this February.

According to the TPD Activity Log, there have been six DUI-related arrests and about 28 warrant-related arrests ranging from traffic misdemeanors to narcotic felonies.

Additionally, there have been seven arrests due to petty theft, two related to auto thefts and two burglaries. One of the two burglary arrests took place on Feb. 4, involving a 50-year-old man shoplifting at the Kohl’s department store located on Countryside Drive.

On Feb. 5, a 26-year-old man was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon, which in this instance was a baseball bat. Twelve additional arrests were made for battery, including domestic violence.

Ten arrests were made this month for public intoxication. On Feb. 8, a 31-year-old woman who was under the influence was arrested for obstructing traffic on Lander Avenue.

A 33-year-old man was arrested on Feb. 17 for punching and breaking a window at Julien Elementary School on Canal Drive.

The TPD is located at 244 N Broadway Avenue in Turlock. In case of an emergency, please call 911. To report any non-emergencies, please call 209-668-1200.
            [post_title] => Community Crime Log: Turlock
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            [post_content] => A recent proposal to build a new student housing community across the street from California State University, Stanislaus has upset local neighbors, leading them to rally together and protest its construction.

Coleraine Capital Group and AMCAL Equities are the driving force behind the project. The apartment complex, which will consist of four, four-story buildings, 680 bedrooms and 560 parking spaces, will be built on the property directly next to the Prime Shine Car Wash and will extend behind Rite-Aid. Located on Monte Vista Avenue between Crowell Road and Dels Lane, the apartment complex will tower over the local neighborhood homes. If approved, the apartments will be the tallest buildings in Turlock.

Patrick Jensen, a Turlock resident, is protesting against the construction. He has posted a sign along the backside of the property that reads, “No 4 Story Apt Here! Call 209-620-4741.”

“I’m all for students and their student housing, and I’m not opposed to apartment complexes, but I think that even a two-story apartment complex would be okay. That way houses can still be given privacy,” Jensen said. “No matter what kind of curtains you put up, with those illuminated parking lots anyone is going to be able to see into your house. When college kids get together there’s parties, late night drinking, throwing up in parking lots. These people living here are all retirees, you know.”

Jensen stated he has no secret agenda and has support from other community members. So far, Jensen has collected over 60 signatures of those who oppose the construction of the new student housing and hopes that an agreement can be reached where everyone involved is happy.

While Jensen is worried about peace and privacy, he also worries about property value.

“My in-laws have lived there since day one," Jensen said. "That’s their retirement home. If you’ve got a four-story apartment building looking into your backyard, your property value will plummet.”

The president of Coleraine Capital Group, David Moon, is aware of the neighborhood unrest and in response held a neighborhood meeting on Jan. 27 to present and discuss their preliminary site plan. The neighbors asked questions and pointed out their areas of concern. According to Moon, the company has since modified their plans in order to address concerns expressed at the meeting.

“The Vista purpose-built student housing community will be designed and operated in order to create a positive, healthy, living-learning environment exclusively for CSUS students,” Moon said.

The new housing complex will have computer labs, study rooms, a swimming pool, fitness center and countless other amenities. Shuttles will also be available to take students to and from campus. Moon also pointed out the security features of the complex, which include a gated perimeter, card key access for every door and security cameras located throughout the property.

Despite protest from the neighbors, these features of the proposed new building sound enticing to current CSU Stanislaus students.

“I’m glad they’re building it," Eddy Luna (junior, Biology) said. "I know the neighbors are upset, but they have to realize that this is a college town, and the school is going to expand. I think it’s great for the school and a great opportunity for future students that may be able to live in it. I would live in it."

As for the university’s involvement in the prospective project, Director of Housing and Residential Life Jennifer Humphrey stated that the university is aware of the project and looking into possible implications for the school.

According to Moon, students may not have to wait too long for the project to begin construction.

“Subject to the required local and state entitlement and permitting process, we would plan to be under construction in the first quarter of 2016, with a projected occupancy of Fall 2017,” Moon said.

Moon plans to submit his updated plans to the city in the next three weeks in hopes that the neighbors will be pleased with the changes. Though, it may be hard to get Patrick Jensen to take down his protest sign.

“I don’t believe anything (Moon) is saying," Jensen said. "He’s a polished, slick salesman trying to talk about only the positive and not bring up any of the negative.”

 
            [post_title] => Student apartment proposal causes protest
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            [post_content] => It is a late Wednesday afternoon, and the glittering eyes of a woman who has been here since 8 AM peek up from behind a mass of dark curls. Her name is Valorie Brown, and she is a woman with hundreds of thousands of worlds at her fingertips. A cascade of golden light floods the room in which she stands, only adding to the delicate majesty that already permeates the bookstore.

Located at 141 North Center Street in downtown Turlock, Brown and her husband Tim opened Lightly Used Books in 2010, a decision that she explains was impulsive.

“My husband had too many books and I had too many books and we both like business so we thought we’d try it,” Brown says. Since first opening their doors, the Browns have expanded their floor space to accommodate their ever growing supply of books.

A walk through the bookstore finds customers transported everywhere from the halcyon days of their youth, where they are rubbing elbows with Alice and the Mad Hatter at tea time, to complicated love triangles in modern day New York. Brown and her husband have been able to curate their collection of books over the years with the help of people who bring in their own.

“Some days we don’t get many books, some days I might get twenty boxes of books, but on average, I would say we get about seven boxes of books a day,” Brown says.

[caption id="attachment_3513" align="alignnone" width="387"]Photo by Andrea Paz/Signal Photo by Andrea Paz/Signal[/caption]

Twenty years worth of decor, mostly acquired from swap meets and antique stores, line the walls and bookshelves of Lightly Used Books. The books are nestled in bookshelves that the Brown family built themselves while Valorie is also responsible for staining one of the bookcases by hand, an impressive feat that she admits with astounding humility.

“It took a lot of time, but not as long as you’d think,” Brown says. “We worked hard, and we had help.” The care and time that has been invested is immediately apparent.

Brown places her copy of The Black Company by Glen Cook down on the counter in front of her as she ponders the future of her bookstore.

“Oh, I’d love to have more business and have more people come in. The longer we’re in business, the more I’m aware of what books people need. When you’re going through the boxes, there’s certain books you know you need to have, because everybody needs A Child Called It. I can spot those books a lot faster now, and I always try to get those whenever I can in order to meet the needs of people,” she says.

There is a young girl running her fingers along the books that are laden with sleep as the store approaches closing time, and there is such a fierce determination in her walk which inevitably evokes in me a sense of intrigue. What is she so intent on finding? I do not ask her, but I recall Brown telling me that although there is no pigeonhole for her customers, most of them are gentle, sensitive people. I say my goodbyes to Brown, thank her for her time, and leave, certain that whatever the young girl was looking for, she will find within the recesses of trembling spines and words immortalized with the knowledge that one day, someone would look for them.

[caption id="attachment_3512" align="alignnone" width="1024"]Photo by Andrea Paz/Signal Photo by Andrea Paz/Signal[/caption]
            [post_title] => Community Spotlight: Lightly Used Books
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            [post_content] => A 2.8 million-year-old jawbone was discovered in Ethiopia and is possibly the oldest human fossil in existence, according to multiple papers published on March 5 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

This mandible fragment (temporarily known by scientists as fossil LD 350-1) is now considered to be the missing link between modern humans and Lucy, our earliest ancestor from 3.2 million years ago.

Calling the discovery "homo species intermediate," researchers now suspect that the Homo genus dates back almost half a million years earlier than previously thought.

With an international team led by Arizona State University researchers, Ethiopian student Chalachew Seyoum discovered the fossil at the Ledi-Geraru research area in the Afar Regional State.

"The moment I found it, I realised that it was important, as this is the time period represented by few (human) fossils in Eastern Africa," Seyoum said to BBC News. 

"[T]his new discovery pushes the human line back by 400,000 years or so, very close to its likely (pre-human) ancestor. Its mix of primitive and advanced features makes the Ledi jaw a good transitional form between (Lucy) and later humans."

According to NPR, the fossil was discovered two years ago on an archaeology site in close proximity to where Lucy was located.

While researchers are still deciding on what Homo species the fossil belongs to, this stunning discovery can further bridge the gaps in human evolution.

For photographs of LD 350-1, visit http://www.vocativ.com/culture/science/oldest-human-fossil/
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            [post_date] => 2015-03-02 13:45:26
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            [post_content] => The California State University, Stanislaus Green Team held a meeting Feb. 19 in the Kirk Lindsey Center.  It was led by Rikki Schmeeckle of the Green Team and speaker Anthony Preston.

The Stanislaus Green Team program is a free service offered via the Modesto Chamber of Commerce. They provide an array of services and resources to the business community that assist with being economically and environmentally smart.

Preston had an engaging activity related to air quality and why the Stanislaus county has the second worst quality of air in California.

Air quality is handled at two levels; Federal level EPA and state level California Air Resources Board.

Valley Air District is the biggest district, yet they have the worst air quality and 20 percent of Stanislaus county kids has asthma.  This proves that it is effecting our young generation.

So, what is the main cause of the Valley air pollution? Heavy Diesel trucks are the main source of air pollution at 42 percent.

There are impacts of wood burning like particulate matter (PM). The valley burns 17 tons of PM daily and PM harms our health.  It can lead to things like lung infections, acute bronchitis, asthma attacks and heart attacks. No burning of fireplaces or burning unless registered can help you protect yourself and others.

As a business environment of agriculture, one should let the public know that they care about public health and cleaner air.

There are a few ways you can get your message heard.  Bring your message to elementary schools, advisory networks and even check air quality day and night.

Many people do not realize what they do on a daily basis affects our air quality. It is not what you drive, but how you drive, when your filling up your car and the amount of hairspray you use because it has no voluntary compounds.

Starting a nationwide program, giving people money and providing transfer services are all things you can do to help reduce air pollution. Some businesses already provide free public transportation to reduce air pollution.

The valley experiences its worst air pollution when school starts due to all the motor vehicles dropping off children and picking them up in the afternoon.

To determine if a child should play or have physical activity, individuals should follow air quality index which states, “Level 1 good air quality, Level 2 moderate, Level 3 unhealthy depending on certain groups, Level 4 unhealthy, and Level 5 is very unhealthy/hazardous."

Contact Outreach and Communications 

public.education@valleyair.org

On Facebook and Twitter

valleyair.org

StanislausGreenTeam.comPhotoGrid_1424444292299
            [post_title] => Stanislaus Green Team
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            [post_date] => 2015-03-02 13:13:53
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            [post_content] => 

The Central Valley Math & Science Alliance (CVMSA) held a student and faculty engagement Feb. 24 in the South Dining Hall.

The CVMSA helps serve students at California State University, Stanislaus majoring in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geology, Math or Physics.

CVMSA offers free breakfast and lunches, “The Commons,” which offers tutoring to STEM students with nine students and four faculty, free printing to their students, grants, research and help for entrance into graduate school.

Not a math or science major but still seek help from “The Commons”? Do not worry.

“CVMSA Peer Mentors provide guidance and academic support to students visiting The Commons,” said Juanita Cruthird, Director of Central Valley Math & Science Alliance.

“Regardless of major, students needing help in math or science courses are welcome to take advantage of walk-in tutoring throughout the week.”

As students sat at tables with their tacos, nachos, salads and fajitas getting to know one another, at least one CVMSA faculty joined each table to help stimulate the conversation.

The activity performed was called “gold fish,” which included each person to pull a question from a bag, read it out loud and have everyone answer the question.

This was a way for students of CVMSA to get to know one another and also for faculty to join in as well.

There was another activity in which someone was to pick a number between one and 37.

Once the number was chosen, that person was to go up and spin the wheel. Whatever they landed on was the prize they received.

The first prize won was a CSU Stanislaus water bottle, the second prize was a travel bag and lastly a shirt that read “I love College.”

To become part of CVMSA, one must declare a major in Chemistry, Biology, Geology, Computer Science, Physics or Math and be a first-generation, low income student.

[post_title] => CVMSA Activities and Lunch [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => cvmsa-activities-lunch [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-04 17:17:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-05 00:17:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3776 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3225 [post_author] => 83 [post_date] => 2015-02-20 13:01:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-02-20 20:01:39 [post_content] => Approximately 25 student and faculty members of the Agricultural Department held a Meet and Greet at the Events Center of California State University, Stanislaus on Feb. 5. The Meet and Greet was held from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. to allow students and instructors to get to know each other on a more personal level and establish relationships early in the semester. Both the staff and students had time to get to know one another over various games including card games like Old Maid.  Heath Sousa, club president of the Agricultural Department, also took the opportunity to welcome students, especially those who were new to CSU Stanislaus. Sousa also took the opportunity, near the end of the gathering, to introduce the alumni who joined them for that evening. Because of the often busy life of those who work in agricultural or farm-related jobs, many students don't have much of an opportunity to get to know one another at CSU Stanislaus' Agriculture department. It is because of this that the Meet and Greet takes place, allowing those of such busy lifestyles a chance to pause and get to know those with whom they would be working. "On top of having to get to know our instructors, we also don't get to really know each other that well," Nina Ferretti of the Agriculture Department [Awaiting verification of this title] said. "The goal [of the Meet and Greet] is to build connections with each other because those are really important when you're going out into the work world. If you have that person who you have that networking connection with, then you can find a job a little bit more easily." The ultimate goal of the Meet and Greet was to establish networks that can help students further down the road. [post_title] => Agriculture Department meet and greet [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => agriculture-department-meet-greet [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-02-20 13:01:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-02-20 20:01:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=3225 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )