Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2990
            [post_author] => 85
            [post_date] => 2014-11-20 13:54:25
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-20 20:54:25
            [post_content] => Students planning on transferring to one of the 10 University of California campuses will face a rise in tuition costs as UC President Janet Napolitano’s plan was approved by the UC governing board on Nov. 20.

According to the Daily Californian, the plan to raise tuition costs over the next five years received a seven to two approval amid UC student protesters shouting “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Napolitano’s got to go” and the opposition of Governor Jerry Brown.

Under Napolitano’s plan revealed on Nov. 13, tuition rates that have been frozen for the past three years will soon begin to increase as much as five percent each year unless the UC system receives more funding.

For example, UC students that pay a current tuition of $12,192 will have to pay a tuition cost of $12,804 next fall.

If this rate continues, by 2019 students might have to pay as much as $15,564 per semester.

“We are being honest, being honest with Californians in terms of cost and also ensuring that we are continuing to maintain the University of California in terms of academic excellence,” Napolitano said to the Associated Press.

According to the LA Times, Senate leader Kevin de León, unsatisfied with the proposal, offered an alternative to Napolitano through a letter and phone call, asking her to consider raising out-of-state tuition instead.

“California’s university system is one of the premier higher education systems in the world, and we should require that non-resident students pay a premium to attend it,” de León wrote in a message to Napolitano. “The revenue generated from these fees can be used to increase affordability and access for more Californians.”

Napolitano had a noncommittal response to de León during a meeting with The Sacramento Bee editorial board.

“Obviously that’s something to be looked at,” Napolitano said. “It would not in and of itself solve this problem.”

De León argued to the LA Times for an out-of-state tuition increase by evaluating the benefits of nonresidents.

“They are not paying for all the building that taxpayers of California paid for during the last 40 years,” de León said.

Not only does de León consider decades of taxpayer investment in the UC system, but he also argues that California’s economy suffers as well.

“Many foreign students take their California degrees back to their home countries,” de León said. “They become entrepreneurs that develop products that they sell back to us.”

Governor Jerry Brown acknowledged the UC financial dilemma in his budget statement released in January.

“The University has undertaken some meaningful initiative to reduce administrative costs; however, it needs to also implement models of delivering quality education at a lower cost and that improve student outcomes,” Brown said in the fiscal report.

According to the LA Times, UC students and faculty members feel misled by Brown because general revenue funds remain $460 million lower than they were seven years ago, though UC state funding has recently risen.

Problems with UC funding have been ongoing for decades, and the issue continues to require attention.

 
            [post_title] => UC tuition increase approved Thursday
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => uc-tuition-increase-approved-thursday
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2014-11-20 18:57:21
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-21 01:57:21
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2990
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [1] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2957
            [post_author] => 89
            [post_date] => 2014-11-14 16:00:00
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-14 23:00:00
            [post_content] => 

Faculty, staff and students discussed newly revised changes to the Executive Order at the Student Fee Advisory Committee’s (SFAC) open forum on Nov. 7.

The revised executive order provides guidance in implementing the board of trustees policy regarding students fees.

“So I had to start with [Executive Order] 1042 and review what policy already existed,” said Suzanne Espinoza, Vice President of Enrollment Services and Student Affairs.

“And the one thing that I noticed is that the original policy did not include a full definition of different category fees, and I thought that that would be useful.”

A committee of 12 voting members, both student and faculty representatives, will serve as advisors that will work with the president regarding student fee issues. Questions and concerns were raised during the open forum regarding the language and meaning of certain regulations and fees listed in the revised executive order that affect CSU Stanislaus.

Since the revision, such as the cost for miscellaneous items, fees are now viewed and addressed within individual courses. Each student is charged the same amount for tuition while extra course fees are then assigned accordingly.

As the policy is different at each university, CSU Stanislaus is working on addressing new changes to the policy derived from the Executive Order 540.

“I am not changing the executive order,” Espinoza said. “I am only adding a section from the frequently asked questions document.”

At the open forum, the idea of working more closely with Associated Students Inc. and having more student representatives was addressed. This would allow for student suggestions and concerns to be more present in discussions.

The next open forum is scheduled to take place on Nov. 18 where the discussion will continue. The newly revised policy form is posted on the school’s website for students to view.

[post_title] => Student fees addressed at open forum [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => student-fees-addressed-open-forum [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-11-14 13:11:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-14 20:11:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2957 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2955 [post_author] => 87 [post_date] => 2014-11-14 15:00:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-14 22:00:07 [post_content] =>

Between Jan. 1 and Nov. 1, there have been 5,400 fires in California, burning 91,912 acres over the course of 2014, according to Cal Fire’s Incident Information.

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) Conservation Camp Program (CCP) has provided inmate firefighters to aid in fighting the flames.

Since 1915, this program has aimed to provide an able and trained workforce for Cal Fire as well as help with community conservation projects.

In 2008, this program worked with the Turlock Fire Department.

Through the CDCR and Cal Fire, the Central California Women’s Facility was given the task of restoring a 1927 American LaFrance Quadruple Combination City Service Ladder Truck for the Turlock Fire Department and the City of Turlock.

For almost an entire year, six female inmates worked on and completed the restoration of the truck.

“It’s important to the city of Turlock and to the Turlock Fire as it will be used for parades, school programs, and other community functions,” said Deborah Patrick, California Corrections Women’s Facility Warden, in a press release.

“It also provided several of our inmates the opportunity to put their vocational skills into practice, increasing their odds of success for eventual re-entry into their community and future job prospects.”

These inmate fire crews are trained to respond to many different types of emergencies, which include fires, floods, search and rescue missions and earthquakes.

Cal Fire states that the CCP inmates provide about three million person-hours fighting fires and responding to emergencies along with seven million person-hours for community service projects.

During the off-season, inmates working with fire departments earn anywhere from $1.45 to $3.90 per day for community service projects.

According to Cal Fire, the CCP has 39 camps located all across California that house roughly 4,300 inmates.

Through these camps, the inmate firefighters allow Cal Fire to work 196 fire crews all year long.

[post_title] => Inmate firefighters help fight California flames [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => inmate-firefighters-help-fight-california-flames [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-11-14 13:10:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-14 20:10:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2955 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2952 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2014-11-14 13:08:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-14 20:08:47 [post_content] =>

The California State University, Stanislaus fiscal year operating fund budget was presented on Oct. 24 for the 2014-2015 fiscal year.

Russ Giambelluca, Vice President of Business and Finance, introduced the key points of university budget changes in a memo and summary to CSU Stanislaus President Joseph F. Sheley and Members of the University Community.

The budget allocation included plans exclusive to CSU Stanislaus, as well as the future of the CSU System-Wide Budget.

In a memo from President Sheley prefacing the budget summary, he identified that planning had begun this past summer, and budget requests were presented to UBAC (University Budget Advisory Committee) during Spring 2014. During this time, vice presidents from each department presented their monetary requests, at which point it was apparent the campus would face challenges in meeting sufficient financial needs.

The immediacy of these challenges to students becomes apparent when touching upon the issue of college affordability.

Though financial aid is a mandatory budget allocation, there is a projected decrease of over one percent in money allotted to this area when compared to the previous fiscal year.  This amounts over to $530,000 less devoted to financial aid for 2014-2015.   

“As a recipient of financial aid, I find a decrease in its funding saddening,” Garrett Smart (junior, Communication Studies) said. “The added stress of financial struggles can be detrimental to a student’s college career and even hinder them from finishing. More money should go to people pursuing education, not less.”

Russ Giambelluca highlighted the necessity for careful allocation of funds to the most immediate needs in the budget introduction.

Based on recommended priorities and the perceived need to approach budgeting conservatively over the next few years in the face of little new revenue likely coming our way, we have adopted a multiyear, diversified source approach this year in an effort to extend our expenditure capacity,” Giambelluca said.

With the 2016 phasing out of Proposition 30, the state measure which implemented a temporary tax increase to fund education, there are expected shifts in where money will be distributed as well as methods to bring money in.

This year, CSU Stanislaus will meet its obligation to the faculty and staff of the campus by adding dollars to the compensation pool, another mandatory allocation for CSU Stanislaus where dollars go to faculty, staff and management salaries and benefits.

Last year no money was taken from the budget for this purpose however, this year allotment to this area is expected to raise from zero, to nearly two percent, or close to two million dollars.

Portions of the budget have also been allocated in the form of one-time commitments that are expected to generate revenue.

These investments include more attention dedicated to the International Education Program.  With new enrollment growth funding restricted, and the sunset of Proposition 30, revenue from one-time investments is aimed at offsetting possible reductions in these limited times.

President Sheley is in agreement with the new and unchanged plans presented, and in a memo has acknowledged that the future requires additional precaution when facing the University’s financial decisions.

The CSU System-Wide Budget highlights decreases in funding mirroring the expectations for CSU Stanislaus, a limited availability of resources which all campuses are faced with recognizing and protecting.

The campus budget for the 2014-2015 fiscal year can be found at www.csustan.edu/UBAC.

[post_title] => Changes in budget allocations to affect financial aid [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => changes-budget-allocations-affect-financial-aid [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-11-20 12:50:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-20 19:50:28 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2952 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )
Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2974
            [post_author] => 81
            [post_date] => 2014-11-20 12:30:34
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-20 19:30:34
            [post_content] => In a world of online social interaction and limitless ways to stay connected with friends and peers, there will always be people who take advantage of the situation.

Since social media’s inception, people have been logging on to chat with friends and post pictures from vacations or other memorable occasions. Unfortunately also since its inception, social media has introduced experienced online users who will post cruel and insensitive comments or material directed at others.

These rogue users feed on the anger, frustration and pain of those they are terrorizing. Similar to the way a child plays the mimicking game or that game where they continuously ask, “Why?” to whatever you tell them.

While it’s easy to shrug off a small child’s annoying ways, it is much more difficult for young adults to deal with the same kind of cruelty from their peers. According to dosomething.org, nearly 43 percent of kids have been bullied online. One in four users has had it happen more than once. Additionally, bullied victims are two to nine times more likely to consider committing suicide.

We are all familiar with the potential outcome cyberbullying can yield: Columbine High School, Sparks, NV and most recently Marysville, WA. These flashbulb memories are some of the most iconic occurrences that have brought national attention to the issue of cyberbullying. Instances where adolescents or young adults have been pushed over the edge by the bullying of their peers.

Victims of cyberbullying are subjected to pain in many different forms. According to dosomething.org, the most common medium for cyberbullying is the cell phone. With the capabilities of modern smartphones to stay connected to all forms of social media, like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, the potential for online bullying to occur has skyrocketed.

There is a relatively new social media app that has been growing in popularity among young adults. The application Yik Yak has been storming across the country for the past year, growing in popularity on college campuses in particular at a very high rate.

The app allows users to post anonymously to a general page and anyone within a mile and a half radius of your smartphone or mobile device can see what you have posted.

According to nobullying.com, 81 percent of young people think bullying online is easier to get away with than bullying in person. This statistic was taken in 2012 — a whole year before Yik Yak first launched.

A similar article published in 2012 in Psychology Today cited a study released by the University of British Columbia, confirming the higher incidence of cyberbullying versus traditional bullying. The study reported that approximately 25 to 30 percent of the young people surveyed admitted experiencing or taking part in cyberbullying. In comparison, only 12 percent said the same about traditional bullying.

The 2012 study also answers, in part, the question of why people cyberbully. Of the youth surveyed for the study, 95 percent indicated what was posted online was intended to be a joke, with only 5 percent meant to cause harm. Anonymity and lack of tone in what is meant by a post – similar to how emails are worded – can clearly lead to a feeling of being bullied thereby becoming one’s reality.
            [post_title] => Yik Yak: New app brings up old problems
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => yik-yak-new-app-brings-old-problems
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2014-11-20 13:00:35
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-20 20:00:35
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2974
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [1] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2972
            [post_author] => 88
            [post_date] => 2014-11-20 12:23:15
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-20 19:23:15
            [post_content] => There are so many ways to keep up with sports in this day in age—from watching them on every high-definition channel to streaming them on computers or keeping up with them on cell phone apps. With so many imitations of the same sports stream, fans need something other than a list of scores to keep them entertained in the sports world. Stanislaus alumnus, Ken Mashinchi has done just that.

A year after graduating as the valedictorian, Mashinchi is attending the University of Southern California and studying at the Annenberg Graduate School of Journalism. As part of his Sports and Society class at USC, Ken is required to produce a sports blog posting once a week. His blog is called “Kickin’ it with Ken.” 

“I try and find topics that aren't completely killed in the media but are still well-known and time-relevant," said Ken Mashinchi.

The blog features articles revolving around Ken's perspective or opinion on current issues. This includes football-related injuries, problems with the NFL, retiring legends or my favorite, The Sad Life of a Sports Fan.

For an interesting sports read, a developing alumni voice or to simply support an upcoming journalist, go to kmashinchi.wordpress.com. 
            [post_title] => Kickin' it With Ken provides fresh take on sports journalism
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => kickin-ken-provides-fresh-take-sports-journalism
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2014-11-20 12:23:15
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-20 19:23:15
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2972
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [2] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2969
            [post_author] => 89
            [post_date] => 2014-11-20 12:21:04
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-20 19:21:04
            [post_content] => “Without struggle, there is no progress.”
 
This motto has been a part of the Omega Nu Omega (ONO) family and has enforced the desire to achieve scholastic excellence, unity and loyalty amongst members for 11 years.
 
Seven women and three men, all seeking to instill the values of education and cultural awareness, created the organization that bonded the group for life. 
 
ONO was the first Greek organization to step and stroll at Stanislaus. The organization also performed the first probate on campus in spring of 2013.  They’ve focused on  encouraging members to become successful attributes to society and achieve higher education. ONO has allowed students to gain experience by providing members the opportunity to hold executive positions that structure the fraternity.
 
“As I held presidency and other  positions for my organization last academic school year, I was able to develop character and improve my leadership skills for my organization,” Davonte Wilson (senior, Sociology) said.
 
The organization is based off the divine nine—the first nine black fraternity and sororities founded in the United States. The black panther mascot is used to symbolize self defense and the blue rose represents the love and loyalty amongst all ONO members.
 
“We are African-American-based, however, we have become a multicultural family, and together we have re-established the organization to be what it is today,” Wilson said.
 
ONO members work together to raise awareness in the campus community by allying with their HIV/AIDS philanthropy.
 
ONO is anticipating their second annual World Aids Day planned for Dec. 3. Informational signs will be posted around campus and red ribbons will be sold for a dollar, allowing the campus community to unite with ONO and raise awareness.
 
All donations will benefit the local non-profit Community Impact Central Valley organization that serves as a support system for families affected by domestic abuse.
 
ONO is planning on extending their family soon by establishing new chapters. If you have any questions regarding the organization or getting involved, get in contact with any ONO member.
 
“I want to be remembered as an individual who helped pave the way for future members,” Wilson said. “And demonstrate that through hard work, dedication, discipline, courage and a supportive Greek family, anything is possible.”

            [post_title] => Organization Feature: Omega Nu Omega steps and strolls on campus
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => organization-feature-omega-nu-omega-steps-strolls-campus
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2014-11-20 12:21:37
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-20 19:21:37
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2969
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [3] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2949
            [post_author] => 83
            [post_date] => 2014-11-13 11:40:01
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-13 18:40:01
            [post_content] => [gallery ids="2948,2947,2946,2945,2944,2943,2942"]
            [post_title] => Photos: NAK Homeless Awareness Week
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => photos-nak-homeless-awareness-week
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2014-11-13 14:37:41
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-13 21:37:41
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2949
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

)
Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2965
            [post_author] => 81
            [post_date] => 2014-11-18 16:47:43
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-18 23:47:43
            [post_content] => Imagine you’re walking down the street and you see someone wearing tattered old clothing and sleeping on a bus stop bench. Perhaps you’ve seen the same person standing near a busy intersection holding a piece of cardboard with the words, “Homeless— Please Help,” written on it. We all have seen it, but are we really aware of what’s being done to help the homeless in the Central Valley?

Homelessness has become a growing problem in many cities across the Central Valley. In an article on the public’s perception of the homeless crisis by Anya Reeser, Reeser said, “At this time, there are an estimated 571 chronically homeless individuals in Turlock alone.”

Why is nothing being done to help the homeless? Citizens, politicians and lawmakers alike seem to have turned a blind eye to this growing problem— not only in Turlock, but also in other Central Valley cities, such as the city of Manteca. In fact, Manteca just recently passed a series of laws addressing homelessness— and those actions have not been without controversy.

Manteca leaders recently passed laws making homeless encampments illegal, as well as banning urinating and defecating in public.

On the surface, it sounds as if the city of Manteca is prosecuting these individuals for being homeless. Manteca has drawn national attention for passing these laws. But more importantly, it has brought to light that many people feel the homeless are being treated very poorly here in the Central Valley.

However, when we take a deeper look into these actions taken by civic leaders, we find out that things aren’t always as they seem.

City Manager Karen McLaughlin said the city’s actions mirror existing state law. So why pass legislation locally that currently exists?

“By prohibiting these actions at the local level, our own city attorney can enforce the violations,” McLaughlin said. “Otherwise, Manteca would have to rely on the San Joaquin County District Attorney’s Office, which has its hands full with having to enforce other violations throughout San Joaquin County, including the city of Stockton,” she said.

“When compared with crimes being committed in other areas of the county, these homeless violations wouldn’t take priority at the county level,” McLaughlin said. “Passing local legislation helps us to take control locally.”

The controversy over Manteca’s actions has received international attention. Facebook postings on a site called, “Brave New Justice: Films,” have prompted telephone calls and emails from across the country and beyond. McLaughlin said she has received complaints from Canada and the United Kingdom.

McLaughlin said the difficulty is in balancing concerns of the local community— the residents and business owners— along with the rights of those who are faced with homelessness. Another challenge is trying to identify resources available for the homeless who want assistance versus those who are homeless by choice, she stated.

The city of Turlock faced a similar issue and ended up partnering with the Turlock Gospel Mission to convert a former warehouse into Turlock’s first year-round homeless shelter, according to an article by John Holland of The Modesto Bee. According to Holland’s article, the $1.8 million project will feature 34 beds for men and 22 for women and children. They hope to open the shelter in December of 2014.

Clearly, there is more to the growing homeless problem afflicting the Central Valley. As complex as the issues are that cause homelessness, the solutions are equally complicated. What is evident is that any long-term solutions will take time and partnership resources from not only local government, but also from churches, local citizens and other members of the community.
            [post_title] => Homelessness in Central Valley not hopeless
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => homelessness-central-valley-not-hopeless
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2014-11-18 16:47:43
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-18 23:47:43
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2965
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [1] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2962
            [post_author] => 82
            [post_date] => 2014-11-17 15:36:30
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-17 22:36:30
            [post_content] => Black Friday has been a long tradition where department stores open early the day after Thanksgiving and have the biggest sales of the year.

But last year, a number of stores opened as early as 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day. This coming Black Friday some stores, such as Best Buy, will open as early as 5 p.m.

I understand wanting to get a good deal, but at this point it’s almost humorous. Black Friday has become an embarrassment, and the biggest culprits are the consumers.

We always want to blame the businesses for taking people away from the Thanksgiving table, but businesses wouldn’t do this if it weren’t for people camping out days before.

It’s the goal of the business world to find the most efficient way to sell their products, and if we keep going to stores earlier every year, it will not stop.

We live in a very busy world; people don’t spend enough time with their loved ones anymore. Thanksgiving is supposed to be one of the few times when families get together.

Everyone likes to say that family is the most important thing, but these days, we are too materialistic. According to the Huffington Post, Americans spent $12.3 billion on Black Friday last year. Black Friday gives these people the opportunity to obtain a variety of material goods at the lowest possible prices.

The initial intention of Black Friday was a good idea. We wake up at five in the morning, get some Starbucks and try to beat people to various items.

But we have given Black Friday precedent over Thanksgiving itself, and we can’t let this continue.

Spend time with your parents, siblings, kids and whoever else is important in your life. Don’t let this holiday virtually make Thanksgiving an afterthought (and we’re not far off).

Going to Black Friday in the middle of the afternoon on Thanksgiving says a lot about what our society finds important; we need to change that perspective.

I understand times are still tough, and great deals on Black Friday are hard to resist. But some things are more important.

Money does buy some happiness, but it won’t buy you the greatest happiness. Spend time with your families. It will be worth a lot more than anything you can buy.
            [post_title] => Black Thursday
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => blackthursday
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2014-11-17 15:36:30
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-17 22:36:30
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2962
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [2] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2909
            [post_author] => 81
            [post_date] => 2014-11-05 16:11:59
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-05 23:11:59
            [post_content] => We’re all familiar with popular social media sites such as Twitter, Instagram and of course, Facebook. Now there’s a new live-feed app called Yik Yak that is taking the world by storm.

Yik Yak launched in 2013 with the intention of giving a live-streaming conversation page based on location. The way the app works has been relatively unseen from social media apps or websites, locking on to your smart phone’s location or GPS services and showing you what other app users within a 1.5-mile radius are posting.

This geo-social networking site allows users to share their thoughts while still keeping their privacy. Every user logs on anonymously and can write up to 200 characters in a single post.

Another interesting aspect to this app is the voting system that maintains what is trending in your area. Users can give postings "up" votes in approval or "down" votes in disapproval. If a posting receives a negative five rating, the posting is deleted from the site automatically.

This app is still in the very early stages of popularity amongst smartphone users, and being in those stages, there are a fair share of hurdles to overcome. One of the biggest concerns with the app at this point is the amount of negative or offensive things posted on the app. Since everything is posted anonymously, it didn’t take long for people to see an opportunity to exploit this loophole.

When complete strangers are given the opportunity to say anything they want while remaining anonymous, you’re asking for drama to start. Also when the target audience is college campuses and communities, that only adds fuel to the fire. College students are driven and opinionated when it comes to their beliefs or ideas. Unfortunately not everyone shares the same opinions (shocking, I know), thus causing conflicts amongst users.

There are also people who just want to say as many offensive and intentionally rude things about whatever and whomever they want online, sad but unfortunately true. Perhaps the most recent example of this would be the hacking of several celebrity photographs and leaking them out to the world, a shallow act from an obviously classless individual.

All negativity aside, the entertainment this app provides outweighs the offensiveness. It allows people within a close proximity to point out things that either come to mind or pique their interests. It allows people to voice their true selves in a relatively judgment-free zone.

There will always be those users whose only intent is to criticize and antagonize other Yakkers online. These few immature children shouldn’t ruin the fun for the rest of us Yik Yak users. At the end of the day, Yik Yak is a fun new way for people to stay connected with those around them and should be used as such.
            [post_title] => Yik Yak, the newest app: It's worth the wasted time
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => yik-yak-newest-app-worth-wasted-time
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2014-11-05 16:11:59
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-05 23:11:59
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2909
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [3] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2855
            [post_author] => 89
            [post_date] => 2014-10-30 16:41:37
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-10-30 23:41:37
            [post_content] => "I can't add my class!" This is a common complaint that spreads throughout campus by paranoid Warriors each semester. As students seeking to receive our bachelor's degrees sooner rather than later, we tend to follow our designed plan established to lead us to graduation promptly. Although we as students tend to feel frustrated with the strict rules set for class enrollment and the room capacity in certain courses, we should all recognize that these regulations are set to place order and fairness during registration time. Informing  ourselves and making sure we understand campus regulations allows for student registration to be completed timely and in order. Eliminating rumors and misunderstandings about registration priorities and regulations will allow for the campus community to set a cleared atmosphere and eliminate concerns established by assumptions and keeping ourselves uninformed.

As a community, we make the constant mistake of assuming that registration enforces priorities to specific groups of students. Priority is distributed by grade level and groups enforced by the federal law such as veterans, disabled students and foster youth.

“Some groups do have priority groups in the beginning because federal law mandates it; veterans, disabled students and foster youth,” Lisa Bernardo, Director-Enrollment Services Department said.

Freshmen and Athletes are also viewed to  receive registration priority. This assumption is wrong.

“Athletes do not have priority,” Bernardo said. ”On all campuses I know they have priority, but on our campus they do not . And I know because we give it.”

We should not be concerned about  these three specific groups of individuals filling up much classroom spaces as it has not been an issue in the past.

"Registration order, which was approved by Academic Senate and the President, is: seniors, classified graduates and credential students, juniors, sophomores, freshmen  and unclassified credential students.”  Bernardo said. “Seniors have earned the priority to go first”

Before registration is complete, advising is required and advised in order assist us in enrolling into the correct courses. Without advising, we may become confused and add classes we  think are either easy or mandatory.

“Absolutely meet with your advisor, map out a plan,” Bernardo said. “You don’t want to take  classes you do not  need. You do not want to waste your time because time is money.”

Time slots are provided in which we are able to add 12 units on the first round and up to 18 units during the second round. It is also important to remember that we are able to add classes until the end of the first pass.

“Registration appointments are given to every eligible student who has been here this semester,” said Bernardo. “We gave out about 9,400 appointments.”

Making sure to have classes mapped out and planned out is the best idea to make sure we enroll during  priority registration time. Having multiple plans will come in handy when classes become closed or are no longer available for enrollment. Do not allow maintenance shut down during the late evening prevent you from enrolling in classes; remain in contact with your plans to ensure your schedule is promptly set and organized.

“I find my advisor to be very helpful in guiding me to take specific classes I need  for my major,”  Ashley Medina (junior, Criminal Justice) said. “I already have my classes set up and have multiple other classes listed just in case.”

Stanislaus has had this registration system set up for at least 20 years. Therefore assuming that it has changed is a mistake that we as students make, and it could be prevented by asking questions and becoming aware by reading and keeping ourselves informed. The enrollment catalog is out for a reason; look at it and inform yourself. If we have concerns, the Enrollment Services Department is open daily to answer questions.
            [post_title] => Stop assuming and start asking
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => registration-myths-and-facts
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2014-10-29 16:48:19
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-10-29 23:48:19
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2855
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

)
Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2959
            [post_author] => 88
            [post_date] => 2014-11-16 13:17:27
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-16 20:17:27
            [post_content] => Without a football team, Warrior fans look for a team that can help them show their spirit, with body paint or morph suits, and it seems that they have chosen the basketball programs to do just that. While the women’s team was one game shy of the playoffs last year, the men’s team made a historic run into the Division II Sweet Sixteen. But, this season shows even more promise and excitement for both the teams and the fans.

“I feel that this year will be exciting for us,” Coach Wayman Strickland said. “It’s another step in the process of us developing a very, very good women’s basketball program here.” The women’s team will be returning senior Briana Cotton (69 REB, 310 pts), but also returning strong underclassmen Riley Holladay (143 REB, 208 pts), Ana Burch (113 REB, 243 Pts) and Jasmine Washington (89 REB, 284 pts). However, Coach Strickland also expressed his excitement over another recruiting class, including two 6-foot-2 freshmen (one redshirt), Emilee VanDyke and Erika Larsen.

“I believe we’ll be the youngest team in conference, so hopefully we’ll be able to play with a little more maturity this year, and we can take that next jump from 13 wins to maybe 16 or 17 wins,” Coach Strickland said.

The women’s basketball season starts on Nov. 14 in Stockton at an exhibition match against the University of the Pacific; their first conference match will not be until Dec. 5 against Cal State LA.

“We’re in a tough, tough conference for women’s basketball, and there are no freebies in our league,” Coach Strickland said to sum up the hard work the women’s basketball team will have ahead of them if they hope to make the conference tournament.

The men’s team, however, became the first basketball team in school history to advance to the NCAA Division II tournament before a heartbreaking end in the Sweet Sixteen. The loss to Chico State also marked the end of several promising collegiate careers for the team’s seniors, leaving some pretty big shoes to fill.

“I think the key for us is that we have 8 or 9 returning players that have all had a pretty good playing time and experience,” Coach Reynolds said. “So we’ll have to rely on that a lot because we’re losing three very good players that were an essential part into our deep run into the playoffs last year.”

Some of those returning players include a large senior class of Shey Mataele (6’2, 224 pts), Brian Lopez (6’0, 13 pts), Clinton Tremelling (6’1, 169 pts), Chris Read (6’4, 422 pts), Tyler Barber (6’6, 124 pts), Rob Walters (6’7, 262 pts) and Wes Bartole (6’5, injured).

“We’ll have some making up to do, but I think with our veterans coming back we’ll be okay,” Coach Reynolds said. Reynolds has also added a four-team freshman recruiting class that ranges from 6-foot-2 Christian Bayne to 6-foot-8 Kyle Gouveia.

The men’s basketball season started with a win on Nov. 7 against Bristol University of Anaheim, where Chris Read lead the team with 21 points and Wes Bartole made his season debut after a year-long injury and recovery process, which kept him out of last year’s historic season. The men’s team will kick off their conference play on Dec. 5 against Cal State LA.
            [post_title] => Warriors basketball anticipated run
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => warriors-basketball-anticipated-run
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2014-11-20 12:50:04
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-20 19:50:04
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2959
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [1] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2923
            [post_author] => 86
            [post_date] => 2014-11-05 17:06:01
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-06 00:06:01
            [post_content] => A school once known for its prestigious athletic program, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (UNC) found itself in the middle of a scandal on Oct. 22. The advisors at UNC have been admitting student athletes into fake classes, also known as “paper classes,” to raise their GPA so they are eligible to play. After 18 years of faking classes, they were finally caught.

According to CNN, during an eight-month investigation by former U.S. Justice Department official, Kenneth Wainstein, a reported 3,100 student athletes were involved in the scandal so far.

“The scandal started out actually as an agent scandal,” CNN correspondent Sara Ganim said. “Some players who had improper contact with agents that was revealed in late 2010.”

President Gerald Gurney of the Drake Group, an incorporation dedicated to academic integrity in collegiate sports, said to CNN reporters, "I can safely say that the scope of the 20-year UNC fraud scandal easily takes the prize for the largest and most nefarious scandal in the history of NCAA enforcement. The depth and breadth of the scheme -- involving counselors, coaches, academic administrators, faculty, athletic administrators, etc. -- eclipses any previous case.”

Finding the faculty who are guilty of cheating athletes out of their education has become a school-wide witch hunt.

“One former head football coach, John Bunting, admitted to knowing of the paper classes, and his successor, Butch Davis, also admitted some knowledge,” Wainstein said. “Current men's basketball coach Roy Williams is steadfast that he did not know.”

Mary Willingham, a former academic advisor at UNC, spoke out about the fraudulent grade boosting five years ago. When the university failed to listen, she spoke to various media sources to get the word out.

According to the Huffington Post, in July Willingham retaliated against UNC for demoting her.

“Willingham's civil suit claims the university spent $500,000 over 24 months to wage a public relations campaign against her, changed her job assignment and responsibilities and condoned a hostile work environment.”

Although Willingham was publicly denounced by the university, individuals at UNC think otherwise. “UNC should formally apologize to Mary Willingham, the researcher, who told the university for free, what the Wainstein report documents in excruciating detail," UNC history professor, Harry Watson, said.

Are these people student athletes or athletic students? When will we stop giving so much power to athletic officials?

 
            [post_title] => Student-athletes? or athlete-students?
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => student-athletes-athlete-students
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2014-11-05 17:06:01
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-06 00:06:01
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2923
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [2] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2920
            [post_author] => 82
            [post_date] => 2014-11-05 16:57:49
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-05 23:57:49
            [post_content] => There are certain days that occur that make us realize sports are not the most important thing in the world. The death of St. Louis Cardinal OF, Oscar Taveras, on Oct. 26 was one of these days.

In the midst of a thrilling World Series, Ken Rosenthal, a commentator, delivered the news during the fourth-inning of Game 4.

Oscar Taveras, 22, died in a car crash along with his girlfriend, Edilia Arvelo, 18. Taveras was visiting his hometown, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic.

The Cardinals Chairman, Bill DeWitt Jr., and General Manager, John Mozeliak released statements following Taveras’ death.

“We are all stunned and deeply saddened by the tragic loss of one of the youngest members of the Cardinals family. Oscar was an amazing talent with a bright future who was taken from us well before his time. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends tonight,” DeWitt said.

“I simply can’t believe it. I first met Oscar when he was 16 years old and will forever remember him as a wonderful young man who was a gifted athlete with an infectious love for life who lived every day to the fullest,” Mozeliak said.

Taveras was born on June 19, 1992 in the Dominican Republic. He lived in Montreal, Canada from the ages of 12 to 16.

Taveras had baseball in his blood. His father was an outfielder in the Milwaukee Brewers’ minor league system.

The St. Louis Cardinals signed Taveras as an undrafted free agent on Nov. 25, 2008. Prior to the Cardinals’ 2012 season, Taveras was their third-best prospect. The following season, Taveras was named the third-best prospect entering 2013. The Cardinals added Taveras to the 40-man roster on Nov. 20, 2014. He was promoted to the MLB roster May 30, 2014.

The highlight of Taveras’ career came during the 7th inning of Game 2 during 2014 National League Divisional series where he hit a game-tying home run against the San Francisco Giants.

This was not just a top MLB prospect, but we lost both a 22 and 18 year-old’s life. During a time of celebration, tragedy struck baseball.

 
            [post_title] => MLB player in fatal car crash
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => mlb-player-fatal-car-crash
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2014-11-05 16:59:15
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-05 23:59:15
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2920
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [3] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 2917
            [post_author] => 88
            [post_date] => 2014-11-05 16:49:44
            [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-05 23:49:44
            [post_content] => In his first and final year as a Warrior, Marcus Bell was a member of the CCAA Championship team and selected as a member of the All-Region team. The upset in the Sweet Sixteen against Chico State was thought to be the end of Bell’s career as a Warrior, but maybe not.

Bell was drafted in the fifth-round to the NBA Development League on Oct. 31, where he joined the Santa Cruz Warriors. The Santa Cruz Warriors are the official NBA minor league affiliate of the Golden State Warriors.

Standing at 6-foot-9, the center quickly made his mark on the Stanislaus program. The season included a 23-9 overall record, with a trip to the Division II Sweet Sixteen. Bell was a significant part of the senior class, earning 18 double-double games with a season average of 17.4 points per game and 10.5 rebounds.

Marcus Bell will kick off his season on Nov. 14 in a new Warriors jersey.

 
            [post_title] => Marcus Bell gets drafted
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => open
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => marcus-bell-gets-drafted
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2014-11-05 16:49:44
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-11-05 23:49:44
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.csusignal.com/?p=2917
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

)